40

I understand the mechanics of static polymorphism using the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern. I just do not understand what is it good for.

The declared motivation is:

We sacrifice some flexibility of dynamic polymorphism for speed.

But why bother with something so complicated like:

template <class Derived>
class Base
{
public:
    void interface()
    {
         // ...
         static_cast<Derived*>(this)->implementation();
         // ...
    }
};

class Derived : Base<Derived>
{
private:
     void implementation();
};

When you can just do:

class Base
{
public: 
    void interface();
}

class Derived : public Base
{
public: 
    void interface();
}

My best guess is that there is no semantic difference in the code and that it is just a matter of good C++ style.

Herb Sutter wrote in Exceptional C++ style: Chapter 18 that:

Prefer to make virtual functions private.

Accompanied of course with a thorough explanation why this is good style.

In the context of this guideline the first example is good, because:

The void implementation() function in the example can pretend to be virtual, since it is here to perform customization of the class. It therefore should be private.

And the second example is bad, since:

We should not meddle with the public interface to perform customization.

My question is:

  1. What am I missing about static polymorphism? Is it all about good C++ style?
  2. When should it be used? What are some guidelines?
2
  • 11
    Note that that function is not virtual, and as a result calling through a base class pointer calls Base::interface not Derived::interface -- you're just hiding the inherited name. There is no polymorphism there. Sep 28 '13 at 3:16
  • I am actually curious of this also. My understanding was that it was purely performance related as the polymorphism would be resolved at compile time rather than runtime.
    – jab
    Sep 28 '13 at 3:21
51

What am I missing about static polymorphism? Is it all about good C++ style?

Static polymorphism and runtime polymorphism are different things and accomplish different goals. They are both technically polymorphism, in that they decide which piece of code to execute based on the type of something. Runtime polymorphism defers binding the type of something (and thus the code that runs) until runtime, while static polymorphism is completely resolved at compile time.

This results in pros and cons for each. For instance, static polymorphism can check assumptions at compile time, or select among options which would not compile otherwise. It also provides tons of information to the compiler and optimizer, which can inline knowing fully the target of calls and other information. But static polymorphism requires that implementations be available for the compiler to inspect in each translation unit, can result in binary code size bloat (templates are fancy pants copy paste), and don't allow these determinations to occur at runtime.

For instance, consider something like std::advance:

template<typename Iterator>
void advance(Iterator& it, ptrdiff_t offset)
{
    // If it is a random access iterator:
    // it += offset;
    // If it is a bidirectional iterator:
    // for (; offset < 0; ++offset) --it;
    // for (; offset > 0; --offset) ++it;
    // Otherwise:
    // for (; offset > 0; --offset) ++it;
}

There's no way to get this to compile using runtime polymorphism. You have to make the decision at compile time. (Typically you would do this with tag dispatch e.g.)

template<typename Iterator>
void advance_impl(Iterator& it, ptrdiff_t offset, random_access_iterator_tag)
{
    // Won't compile for bidirectional iterators!
    it += offset;
}

template<typename Iterator>
void advance_impl(Iterator& it, ptrdiff_t offset, bidirectional_iterator_tag)
{
    // Works for random access, but slow
    for (; offset < 0; ++offset) --it; // Won't compile for forward iterators
    for (; offset > 0; --offset) ++it;
}

template<typename Iterator>
void advance_impl(Iterator& it, ptrdiff_t offset, forward_iterator_tag)
{
     // Doesn't allow negative indices! But works for forward iterators...
     for (; offset > 0; --offset) ++it;
}

template<typename Iterator>
void advance(Iterator& it, ptrdiff_t offset)
{
    // Use overloading to select the right one!
    advance_impl(it, offset, typename iterator_traits<Iterator>::iterator_category());
}  

Similarly, there are cases where you really don't know the type at compile time. Consider:

void DoAndLog(std::ostream& out, int parameter)
{
    out << "Logging!";
}

Here, DoAndLog doesn't know anything about the actual ostream implementation it gets -- and it may be impossible to statically determine what type will be passed in. Sure, this can be turned into a template:

template<typename StreamT>
void DoAndLog(StreamT& out, int parameter)
{
    out << "Logging!";
}

But this forces DoAndLog to be implemented in a header file, which may be impractical. It also requires that all possible implementations of StreamT are visible at compile time, which may not be true -- runtime polymorphism can work (although this is not recommended) across DLL or SO boundaries.


When should it be used? What are some guidelines?

This is like someone coming to you and saying "when I'm writing a sentence, should I use compound sentences or simple sentences"? Or perhaps a painter saying "should I always use red paint or blue paint?" There is no right answer, and there is no set of rules that can be blindly followed here. You have to look at the pros and cons of each approach, and decide which best maps to your particular problem domain.


As for the CRTP, most use cases for that are to allow the base class to provide something in terms of the derived class; e.g. Boost's iterator_facade. The base class needs to have things like DerivedClass operator++() { /* Increment and return *this */ } inside -- specified in terms of derived in the member function signatures.

It can be used for polymorphic purposes, but I haven't seen too many of those.

5
  • 1
    Great answer! Thank you! Sep 28 '13 at 3:46
  • Except std::ostream does not have virtual methods and usually should not be subclassed. Code that wants polymorphic output behavior should derive from std::basic_streambuf<char>, then construct an ordinary std::ostream from that.
    – aschepler
    Sep 28 '13 at 3:59
  • @aschepler: If you want to define a new sink, yes. Yet, std::sstream vs std::fstream vs std::cout (even though its type is unspecified) are runtime polymorphic, and they derive from ostream. Sep 28 '13 at 4:01
  • @BillyONeal There is one sentence in your answer that I cannot understand: "There's no way to get this to compile using runtime polymorphism." Isn't it possible to have an abstract class for iterator and every iterator implements its advance functions? Why this should be done at compile time?
    – Gupta
    Oct 12 '18 at 11:01
  • @Gupta there's no way to implement advance with runtime polymorphism, given the definition of iterator we have. If you can change anything, then yes, you can require that all iterators derive from an iterator base class / interface. However that means that pointers are now a class type.
    – Caleth
    Jun 1 at 14:46
4

The link you provide mentions boost iterators as an example of static polymorphism. STL iterators also exhibit this pattern. Lets take a look at an example and consider why the authors of those types decided this pattern was appropriate:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void print_ints( vector<int> const& some_ints )
{
    for( vector<int>::const_iterator i = some_ints.begin(), end = some_ints.end(); i != end; ++i )
    {
        cout << *i;
    }
}

Now, how would we implement int vector<int>::const_iterator::operator*() const; Can we use polymprhism for this? Well, no. What would the signature of our virtual function be? void const* operator*() const? That's useless! The type has been erased (degraded from int to void*). Instead, the curiously recurring template pattern steps in to help us generate the iterator type. Here is a rough approximation of the iterator class we would need to implement the above:

template<typename T>
class const_iterator_base
{
public:
    const_iterator_base():{}

    T::contained_type const& operator*() const { return Ptr(); }
    T::contained_type const& operator->() const { return Ptr(); }
    // increment, decrement, etc, can be implemented and forwarded to T
    // ....
private:
    T::contained_type const* Ptr() const { return static_cast<T>(this)->Ptr(); }
};

Traditional dynamic polymorphism could not provide the above implementation!

A related and important term is parametric polymorphism. This allows you to implement similar APIs in, say, python that you can using the curiously recurring template pattern in C++. Hope this is helpful!

I think it's worth taking a stab at the source of all this complexity, and why languages like Java and C# mostly try to avoid it: type erasure! In c++ there is no useful all containing Object type with useful information. Instead we have void* and once you have void* you truely have nothing! If you have an interface that decays to void* the only way to recover is by making dangerous assumptions or keeping extra type information around.

4
  • 1
    I'm not sure your example is terribly convincing; your second case has an example use if the polymorphism, but the first does not. The class definitions are about the same length. It also isn't clear to a casual observer why the second example is slower than the first one... Sep 28 '13 at 3:51
  • Yeah, that example isn't really useful. I should probably just nuke it. The point about type erasure is really all I should talk about.
    – Dan O
    Sep 28 '13 at 3:56
  • Not sure why there has to be magic. std::vector<std::unique_ptr<IDrawable>> supplies all the necessary magic. Sep 28 '13 at 3:56
  • 1
    Haha, sorry. I nuked my comment right after I wrote it. I'm a monster!
    – Dan O
    Sep 28 '13 at 3:56
1

While there may be cases where static polymorphism is useful (the other answers have listed a few), I would generally see it as a bad thing. Why? Because you cannot actually use a pointer to the base class anymore, you always have to provide a template argument providing the exact derived type. And in that case, you could just as well use the derived type directly. And, to put it bluntly, static polymorphism is not what object orientation is about.

The runtime difference between static and dynamic polymorphism is exactly two pointer dereferenciations (iff the compiler really inlines the dispatch method in the base class, if it doesn't for some reason, static polymorphism is slower). That's not really expensive, especially since the second lookup should virtually always hit the cache. All in all, those lookups are usually cheaper than the function call itself, and are certainly worth it to get the real flexibility provided by dynamic polymorphism.

8
  • I'm not sure I buy the flexibility argument. Static polymorphism works regardless of the type involved -- even built in types like pointers (See my advance example in my answer). Runtime polymorphism requires that a type explicitly declare that it wants to participate in your genericity by deriving from some other type. As for "not what object orientation is about" -- yes, and many see that as a good thing. OOP is a great paradigm for some problem domains, but it isn't the panacea it is often made out to be. Sep 28 '13 at 18:08
  • @BillyONeal Static polymorphism works regardless of the type involved -- even built in types like pointers you definitely have a point there. I even agree with you that OOP is not the one true paradigm. However, I firmly believe that many people have the wrong impression of what OOP is actually about, because they have neven known the flexibility brought about by a well designed, purely object oriented programming language and library, as Objective-C and Cocoa are. Don't get me wrong, I'm not an advocate of Apple, but wrt. language, they really did the right thing. Sep 28 '13 at 18:36
  • How is that more flexible than what can be accomplished statically? Cocoa uses runtime polymorphism because Objective-C has no other kind, not a result of inherent superiority. Sep 28 '13 at 22:57
  • @BillyONeal Have you ever worked with it? I have, and the difference is huge. The point is, with static polymorphism, the compiler has to know the precise type of everything everywhere - something that sometimes even the programmer does not want to know. It basically defeats the flexibility brought about by inheritance. Sep 29 '13 at 6:06
  • 2
    @BillyONeal Sounds to me like we should just agree to disagree. To clarify, this was my answer to your question "Do you have a code example which explicitly shows something that is possible with runtime polymorphism that is not possible with static polymorphism?", and the loop being in the library is clearly something that can't be achieved with templates. I don't say it matters much. What matters is the amount of template arguments that pollute your code with static polymorphism. But I guess, you have to have been working seriously with dynamic polymorphism to really appreciate it. Sep 30 '13 at 19:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.