41

I've searched on internet for quite some time and I'm unable to figure out how to configure the maven-war plugin or something alike so that the system dependencies are included in the built-war (WEB-INF/lib folder)

I use the maven dependency plugin in case of a jar-build as :

<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>install</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>copy-dependencies</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <outputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/lib</outputDirectory>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

but I'm unable to understand what is to be done in case of a war build. I've tried using the maven-war plugin, but it's not including system-dependencies in the build.

[UPDATE]

I'm having depedencies of type :

<dependency>
    <groupId>LoginRadius</groupId>
    <artifactId>LoginRadius</artifactId>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <systemPath>${basedir}\lib\LoginRadius-1.0.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

in my POM and these dependencies are not included in WEB-INF/lib when the war is build.

4
22

Let me try to summarise the options I tried :

<packagingIncludes>${java.home}/lib/jfxrt.jar</packagingIncludes>

This doesn't work! Also, only having the jar name, excludes everything else, so if you are willing to try then try

<packagingIncludes>${java.home}/lib/jfxrt.jar,**/*</packagingIncludes>

Jatin's answer seemed a bit complex and I tried going through the POM again & again to figure out where exactly were the system jars mentioned to be included in WEB-INF POM.

Anyways, I ended up using this solution, which wasn't working at first but after some time and some corrections worked :

I installed the jar in my local repository using the below command :

mvn install:install-file -Dfile="C:\Users\hp\Documents\NetBeansProjects\TwitterAndLoginRadiusMaven\lib\LoginRadius-1.0.jar" -DgroupId=LoginRadius -DartifactId=LoginRadius -Dversion=1.0 -Dpackaging=jar`

After running the above command, I changed the dependency in POM to

<dependency>
   <groupId>LoginRadius</groupId>
   <artifactId>LoginRadius</artifactId>
   <!--<scope>system</scope>-->
   <version>1.0</version>
   <!--<systemPath>${basedir}\lib\LoginRadius-1.0.jar</systemPath>-->
</dependency>

NOTE - See I've commented the system scope & systemPath.

Building the war now, includes this LoginRadius-1.0.jar in WEB-INF/lib

4
  • 3
    So, the Maven "fundamentalists" don't care that you now cannot have a 2 step build consisting of (ONLY) the steps: (1) Fetch from source control; (2) type a single build command (whether it's mvn, ant, make or build.{sh|bat}). This "solution", which I'm not blaming you for, it just seems to be part of Maven, now has a dependency that you either run this magic "install" incantation to put stuff in ~/.m2/ cache directory, OR, possess a work-group "Nexus" type cache in front of Maven Central which you also have permission to "deploy" things into. – Roboprog Oct 9 '15 at 21:05
  • Maven's dependency management model works great when you are pulling in Apache and Spring libraries, but not so much when you have libraries (jars) from vendors who do not want their stuff in Maven Central :-( – Roboprog Oct 9 '15 at 21:07
  • I agree. The need to put everything into repositories is a real inadequacy in Maven, since there actually could be reasons why someone may not want to do so (like having a single small jar that isn't worth creating a whole repo for). This really needs to be corrected. Meanwhile, I am switching to gradle... – Factor Three Aug 13 '16 at 4:39
  • This would be fine so long as the third party library allows the jar to be renamed. Some libraries from SAP do not allow the renaming that maven uses. So I have to continue using a dependency with a system scope. – JRSofty Feb 13 '18 at 8:27
16

If by chance you can't install the third party library to your local repository, due to some silly naming/packaging checks by the third party, you can still add your system scoped dependencies to your final package at build time (at least if you are building a webapp) using the maven-war-plugin where you would need to create a configuration like this.

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>3.2.0</version>
    <configuration>
        <failOnMissingWebXml>true</failOnMissingWebXml>
        <webResources>
            <resource>
               <directory>path/to/lib/in/project</directory>
               <targetPath>WEB-INF/lib</targetPath>
            </resource>
        </webResources>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

Not sure but I believe that the library must be somewhere local to the project's base directory. I tend to create a directory under src/main/ called lib to hold these sorts of 3rd party libs. During build process they are placed in the correct directory and added to the war file.

2
  • if i do this. it is necessary to include the libraries as dependencies also? or do i have to remove the system dependencies? – elbraulio Apr 11 '19 at 20:42
  • @elbraulio I'm guessing you are asking if you need to specifically add includes for the normal dependencies. The standard dependencies (compile in scope) are handled normally, this should only target the ones that are system in scope. – JRSofty Apr 12 '19 at 9:29
7

You can configure the war plugin to have all or some jar included or excluded as per your need as mentioned below. Simple & works

           <plugin>
                <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.6</version>
                <configuration>
                    <webResources>
                        <resource>
                            <directory>${project.basedir}\lib</directory>
                            <targetPath>WEB-INF/lib</targetPath>
                            <filtering>false</filtering>
                            <includes>
                                <include>**/*.jar</include>
                            </includes>
                            <excludes>
                                <include>**/javax.servlet-api-3.1.0.jar</include>
                            </excludes>
                        </resource>
                    </webResources>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
4

If you meant as jar dependencies, then below is a sample pom.xml which takes are needed files and generates a war file:

 <build>
        <defaultGoal>install</defaultGoal>
        <sourceDirectory>${project.basedir}/src/main/java</sourceDirectory>
        <testSourceDirectory>${project.basedir}/src/test/java</testSourceDirectory>
        <outputDirectory>${project.basedir}/target/classes</outputDirectory>
        <testOutputDirectory>${project.basedir}/target/test-classes</testOutputDirectory>
        <resources>
            <resource>
                <directory>${project.basedir}/src/main/resources</directory>
            </resource>
        </resources>
        <testResources>
            <testResource>
                <directory>${project.basedir}/src/test/resources</directory>
            </testResource>
        </testResources>
        <pluginManagement>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>2.0.2</version>
                    <configuration>
                        <source>1.5</source>
                        <target>1.5</target>
                        <debug>true</debug>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>
                <plugin>
                    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>2.4</version>
                    <configuration>
                        <includeEmptyDirs>true</includeEmptyDirs>
                        <webResources>
                            <resource>
                                <directory>ui</directory>
                                <targetPath></targetPath>
                                <includes>
                                    <include>**</include>
                                </includes>
                            </resource>
                            <resource>
                                <directory>lib</directory>
                                <targetPath>WEB-INF</targetPath>
                                <includes>
                                    <include>**/*.xml</include>
                                    <include>**/log4j.properties</include>
                                </includes>
                            </resource>
//edited below
                            <resource>
                               <directory>lib</directory>
                               <targetPath>WEB_INF/lib</targetPath>
                               <includes>
                                    <include>**/*.jar</include>
                               </includes>
                            </resource>
                        </webResources>
                        <webXml>${project.basedir}/WEB-INF/web.xml</webXml>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>

                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-source-plugin</artifactId>
                    <executions>
                        <execution>
                            <id>attach-sources</id>
                            <goals>
                                <goal>jar</goal>
                            </goals>
                        </execution>
                    </executions>
                </plugin>

            </plugins>
        </pluginManagement>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3.2</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.6</source>
                    <target>1.6</target>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
6
  • Where does it say that the system-dependencies (a few jars) will go into the WEB-INF/lib folder in the build. – coding_idiot Sep 28 '13 at 10:20
  • @coding_idiot the maven-war-plugin automatically does that by putting all your dependencies in the WEB-INF/lib folder – Jatin Sep 28 '13 at 11:29
  • where do you specify the system jars ? I was unable to see any jar or jar-location specified anywhere. – coding_idiot Sep 28 '13 at 11:38
  • 2
    <resource><directory>lib</directory> <targetPath>WEB_INF/lib</targetPath> <includes> <include>**/*.jar</include> </includes> </resource> This code doesn't include system dependencies that I added, in the resultant war. I've also modified my question to specify how I've included system dependencies in my POM. – coding_idiot Sep 28 '13 at 14:22
  • 3
    This worked for me. Beware : the example code includes a "maven-compiler-plugin" for Java version 1.5, I do not needed that. Also, it is not "WEB_INF" but "WEB-INF"!!! – electrotype Oct 30 '14 at 13:49
3

Based on your initial POM, I would suggest to send them directly to the WEB-INF/lib directory

                    <goals>
                        <goal>copy-dependencies</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <outputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/${project.artifactId}-${project.version}/WEB-INF/lib</outputDirectory>
                    </configuration>
1
  • 1
    jdevora's approach did not work for me. I got the .jar packaged into WEB-INF/lib as jdevora wrote, when building the WAR with mvn command line tool. But when running Wildfly server directly from eclipse, the eclipse deployment didn't use the pom copy task nor the .war compiled before. It deployed based on eclipse's maven dependencies, and so it skipped these JARs. – Christoph Bimminger Feb 27 '17 at 22:38
0
mvn org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-install-plugin:2.5.1:install-file \
  -Dfile=~/Desktop/medici-1.0.1.jar \
  -DgroupId=com.hp \
  -DartifactId=medici \
  -Dversion=1.0.1 \
  -Dpackaging=jar \
  -DlocalRepositoryPath=lib

If all went well, you can find your artifact published inside of lib.

project$ find lib
lib
lib/com
lib/com/hp
lib/com/hp/medici
lib/com/hp/medici/1.0.1
lib/com/hp/medici/1.0.1/medici-1.0.1.jar
lib/com/hp/medici/1.0.1/medici-1.0.1.pom
lib/com/hp/medici/maven-metadata-local.xml
Note the structure here mimics what you’d find in ~/.m2.

Now, in your pom.xml, declare it in your project a Maven repository.

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>local-repo</id>
        <url>file://${basedir}/lib</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

And lastly, in your pom.xml declare a dependency on the local .jar like you would for any dependency.

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.hp.medici</groupId>
        <artifactId>medici</artifactId>
        <version>1.0.1</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
0

It may be problem of the scope where the dependencies are defined:

  • compile: Dependencies in "compile" scope will automatically be copied to the target's WEB-INF/lib as part of the Maven build.
  • provided: Dependencies in "provided" scope will not be copied (you would use this for server-supplied jars such as the JSP-api.jar).

To generate a WAR in Maven, 2 goals have to be run: "compile" and "war:war". Running the war goal alone won't compile the Java source . If you prefer, run one of the master goals, such as "package".

If using eclipse:

select the POM in the project explorer and select the "Run" context menu option. This will build and execute Maven run profile (or use an existing one). Maven run profiles behave just like regular run/debug profiles except that their profile edit dialogs support Maven-specific features.

source: https://coderanch.com/t/594897/ide/include-maven-dependencies-war-file

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