95

My integer input is suppose 12345, I want to split and put it into an array as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
How will I be able to do it?

10 Answers 10

153
>>> [int(i) for i in str(12345)]

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
100

return array as string

>>> list(str(12345))
['1', '2', '3', '4', '5']

return array as integer

>>> map(int,str(12345))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
2
  • 27
    In Python3, that would be list(map(int,str(12345))) – Serge Stroobandt Aug 26 '17 at 20:51
  • Or could also be [*map(int,str(12345))] – teepee Nov 26 '20 at 18:51
10
[int(i) for i in str(number)]

or, if do not want to use a list comprehension or you want to use a base different from 10

from __future__ import division # for compatibility of // between Python 2 and 3
def digits(number, base=10):
    assert number >= 0
    if number == 0:
        return [0]
    l = []
    while number > 0:
        l.append(number % base)
        number = number // base
    return l
3
  • Good call, this was what I was about to write :) – Russell Dec 15 '09 at 11:20
  • @nd you can put the base of the number inside int like int(i,2) for binary see my post – fabrizioM Dec 15 '09 at 11:29
  • This is a good answer, but would benefit from the use of divmod – shayaan Nov 12 '18 at 5:25
9

I'd rather not turn an integer into a string, so here's the function I use for this:

def digitize(n, base=10):
    if n == 0:
        yield 0
    while n:
        n, d = divmod(n, base)
        yield d

Examples:

tuple(digitize(123456789)) == (9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1)
tuple(digitize(0b1101110, 2)) == (0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1)
tuple(digitize(0x123456789ABCDEF, 16)) == (15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1)

As you can see, this will yield digits from right to left. If you'd like the digits from left to right, you'll need to create a sequence out of it, then reverse it:

reversed(tuple(digitize(x)))

You can also use this function for base conversion as you split the integer. The following example splits a hexadecimal number into binary nibbles as tuples:

import itertools as it
tuple(it.zip_longest(*[digitize(0x123456789ABCDEF, 2)]*4, fillvalue=0)) == ((1, 1, 1, 1), (0, 1, 1, 1), (1, 0, 1, 1), (0, 0, 1, 1), (1, 1, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0, 1), (0, 0, 0, 1), (1, 1, 1, 0), (0, 1, 1, 0), (1, 0, 1, 0), (0, 0, 1, 0), (1, 1, 0, 0), (0, 1, 0, 0), (1, 0, 0, 0))

Note that this method doesn't handle decimals, but could be adapted to.

3

like @nd says but using the built-in function of int to convert to a different base

>>> [ int(i,16) for i in '0123456789ABCDEF' ]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]

>>> [int(i,2) for i in "100 010 110 111".split()]
[4, 2, 6, 7]

I don't know what is the final objective but take a look also inside the decimal module of python for doing stuff like

>>> Decimal('3.1415926535') + Decimal('2.7182818285')
Decimal('5.85987')
1
  • Decimal is useless for this question – jamylak Feb 4 '18 at 4:20
2

While list(map(int, str(x))) is the Pythonic approach, you can formulate logic to derive digits without any type conversion:

from math import log10

def digitize(x):
    n = int(log10(x))
    for i in range(n, -1, -1):
        factor = 10**i
        k = x // factor
        yield k
        x -= k * factor

res = list(digitize(5243))

[5, 2, 4, 3]

One benefit of a generator is you can feed seamlessly to set, tuple, next, etc, without any additional logic.

0

Splitting a single number to it's digits (as answered by all):

>>> [int(i) for i in str(12345)]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

But, to get digits from a list of numbers:

>>> [int(d) for d in ''.join(str(x) for x in [12, 34, 5])]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

So like to know, if we can do the above, more efficiently.

0

Maybe join+split:

>>> a=12345
>>> list(map(int,' '.join(str(a)).split()))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> [int(i) for i in ' '.join(str(a)).split()]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> 

str.join + str.split is your friend, also we use map or list comprehension to get a list, (split what we join :-)).

0

Another solution that does not involve converting to/from strings:

from math import log10

def decompose(n):
    if n == 0:
        return [0]
    b = int(log10(n)) + 1
    return [(n // (10 ** i)) % 10 for i in reversed(range(b))]
-1

Strings are just as iterable as arrays, so just convert it to string:

str(12345)
1
  • OP wants ints not strings – jamylak Feb 4 '18 at 4:19

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.