12

How to find the minimum positive number K such that for each item in the array, adding or subtracting a number from [-K, K] can lead to a strictly ascending array?

For example:

  • the array is [10, 2, 20]
  • the min K is 5, a possible result is [10-5, 2+4, 20]
  • k = 4 is not OK, because 10-4 == 2+4; the array can not be transformed to strictly ascending order

My guess is as follows

define f(i, j) = a[i] - a[j] + j-i-1 (require for i < j and a[i] > a[j] : all reverse order pairs)

The min K must satisfy the condition:

2*K > max f(i,j)

because if a pair (i, j) is not in ascending order, a[j] can only add K at most, a[i] can subtract K at most, and you need to leave space for items between a[i] and a[j] (because it's strictly ascending order), so (a[j] + K) - (a[i] - K) should be greater than (j-i-1) (the length between them).

So k >= max f(i, j)/2 + 1

The problem is I cannot prove whether k = max f(i, j)/2 + 1 is OK or not?


more clues:

i've thought about find an algorithm to determine a given K is enough or not, then we can use the algorithm to try each K from the possible minimum up to find a solution.

i'v come up with an algorithm like this:

for i in n->1  # n is array length
if i == n:
    add K to a[i]   # add the max to the last item won't affect order
else:
    # the method is try to make a[i] as big as possible and still < a[i+1]
    find a num k1 in [-K, K] to make a[i] to bottom closest to a[i+1]-1
    if found:
        add k1 to a[i]
    else no k1 in [-K, K] can make a[i] < a[i+1]
        return false
return true

i'm also such an algorithm is right or not

  • Perhaps this should go in cs.SE or cstheory.SE? – Ramchandra Apte Sep 29 '13 at 9:06
  • maybe, but i also though about if we can find a algorithm to determine a K is OK, or not, then we can try every possible K from the mininum until we find a solution – boydc2011 Sep 29 '13 at 9:11
  • for instance i = 4 and j = 5, the space between them is 0, which is j - i -1 – boydc2011 Sep 29 '13 at 9:21
11

I think your guess is correct, but I can't prove it as well :-) Instead, I would start by simplifying your question

How to find the minimum positive number K such that for each item in the array, adding or subtracting a number from [-K, K] can lead to a strictly ascending array?

to this equivalent one by "adding" K:

How to find the minimum positive number 2*K such that for each item in the array, adding a number from [0, 2*K] can lead to a strictly ascending array?

We can solve that quite easily by iterating the array and keeping track of the needed 2K value for fulfilling the condition. It's quite similar to @ruakh's one but without the subtractions:

k2 = 0
last = arr[0]
for each cur in arr from 1
    if cur + k2 <= last
        last ++
        k2 = last - cur
    else
        last = cur
k = ceil ( k2 / 2 )
  • 2
    The idea of using a translation to a purely positive offset does make reasoning easier, nice touch. – Matthieu M. Sep 29 '13 at 15:33
  • @Bergi can you explain why the corrections last++ and k2 = last - cur are necessary? From what I understand, you need to do those adjustments if it's still not strictly increasing. Is that correct? But I don't understand why then you those adjustments would help it become strictly increasing. – AlanH Oct 5 '16 at 19:56
  • @AlanH k2 = last - cur just puts k2 to the amount necessary so that there is a value x from [0, k2] for which cur + x >= last - i.e. that the current value can fulfill the requirement. Yes, the last++ is just to make sure that it's strictly increasing not just increasing. – Bergi Oct 5 '16 at 20:11
8

I think you're overthinking this a bit. You can just iterate over the elements of the array, keeping track of the current minimum-possible value of K, and of the current minimum-possible value of the last-seen element given that value of K. Whenever you find an element that proves your K to be too small, you can increase it accordingly.

For example, in Java:

int[] array = { 10, 2, 20 };
int K = 0, last = array[0];
for (int i = 1; i < array.length; ++i) {
    if (last >= array[i] + K) {
        // If we're here, then our value for K wasn't enough: the minimum
        // possible value of the previous element after transformation is still
        // not less than the maximum possible value of the current element after
        // transformation; so, we need to increase K, allowing us to decrease
        // the former and increase the latter.
        int correction = (last - (array[i] + K)) / 2 + 1;
        K += correction;
        last -= correction;
        ++last;
    } else {
        // If we're here, then our value for K was fine, and we just need to
        // record the minimum possible value of the current value after
        // transformation. (It has to be greater than the minimum possible value
        // of the previous element, and it has to be within the K-bound.)
        if (last < array[i] - K) {
            last = array[i] - K;
        } else {
            ++last;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    when you correct the "last", would it be smaller than the elements before "last"? – boydc2011 Sep 29 '13 at 9:39
  • oh, sorry, "last" is an value not index – boydc2011 Sep 29 '13 at 9:42
  • Hi, Can you please explain it further. I am solving the same problem. but not understanding your logic. – Aks Jun 1 '14 at 12:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.