164

In my GNUmakefile, I would like to have a rule that uses a temporary directory. For example:

out.tar: TMP := $(shell mktemp -d)
        echo hi $(TMP)/hi.txt
        tar -C $(TMP) cf $@ .
        rm -rf $(TMP)

As written, the above rule creates the temporary directory at the time that the rule is parsed. This means that, even I don't make out.tar all the time, many temporary directories get created. I would like to avoid my /tmp being littered with unused temporary directories.

Is there a way to cause the variable to only be defined when the rule is fired, as opposed to whenever it is defined?

My main thought is to dump the mktemp and tar into a shell script but that seems somewhat unsightly.

258

In your example, the TMP variable is set (and the temporary directory created) whenever the rules for out.tar are evaluated. In order to create the directory only when out.tar is actually fired, you need to move the directory creation down into the steps:

out.tar : 
    $(eval TMP := $(shell mktemp -d))
    @echo hi $(TMP)/hi.txt
    tar -C $(TMP) cf $@ .
    rm -rf $(TMP)

The eval function evaluates a string as if it had been typed into the makefile manually. In this case, it sets the TMP variable to the result of the shell function call.

edit (in response to comments):

To create a unique variable, you could do the following:

out.tar : 
    $(eval $@_TMP := $(shell mktemp -d))
    @echo hi $($@_TMP)/hi.txt
    tar -C $($@_TMP) cf $@ .
    rm -rf $($@_TMP)

This would prepend the name of the target (out.tar, in this case) to the variable, producing a variable with the name out.tar_TMP. Hopefully, that is enough to prevent conflicts.

  • 2
    Cool a few clarifications... this won't scope TMP to this target, will it? So if there are other rules that have their own $(TMP) usage (possibly in parallel with -j), there can be conflicts? Also, is the @echo even necessary? Seems you could just leave it out. – Emil Sit Dec 15 '09 at 19:12
  • 3
    Seems to do the trick (though a bit opaque to the average non-Make guru :-) Thanks! – Emil Sit Dec 16 '09 at 14:25
  • 23
    Be careful with this solution! $(eval $@_TMP := $(shell mktemp -d)) will happen when the Makefile is first evaluated not in order of the rule procedures. In other words, $(eval ...) happens sooner than you think. While that might be okay for this example, this method will cause problems for some sequential operations. – JamesThomasMoon1979 Jun 11 '15 at 2:53
  • 1
    @JamesThomasMoon1979 do you know how to overcome those limitations, e.g. eval some variables that should be a result of steps executed earlier in the rule? – Vadim Kotov Jun 5 '17 at 13:36
  • 1
    Answering my own question: the workaround for me was creating files during 1st rule execution, and trying to eval them in the first step of 2nd rule. – Vadim Kotov Jun 5 '17 at 13:59
43

A relatively easy way of doing this is to write the entire sequence as a shell script.

out.tar:
   set -e ;\
   TMP=$$(mktemp -d) ;\
   echo hi $$TMP/hi.txt ;\
   tar -C $$TMP cf $@ . ;\
   rm -rf $$TMP ;\

I have consolidated some related tips here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/29085684/86967

  • 3
    This is definitely the simplest and therefore best answer (avoiding @ and eval and doing the same job). Note that in your output you see $TMP (e.g. tar -C $TMP ...) although the value is correcty passed to the command. – Karl Richter May 8 '15 at 9:21
  • This is how it's normally done; I hope people see this answer because in practice nobody goes through all the effort of the accepted one. – pmos Mar 8 '17 at 14:21
  • What if you are using shell specific commands ? In that case shell commands shall be in same shell language than the one calling make, right ? I had seen some makefile with shebang. – ptitpion Apr 25 '18 at 13:34
  • @ptitpion: You may also want SHELL := /bin/bash in your makefile to enable BASH-specific features. – nobar Apr 25 '18 at 16:18
25

Another possibility is to use separate lines to set up Make variables when a rule fires.

For example, here is a makefile with two rules. If a rule fires, it creates a temp dir and sets TMP to the temp dir name.

PHONY = ruleA ruleB display

all: ruleA

ruleA: TMP = $(shell mktemp -d testruleA_XXXX)
ruleA: display

ruleB: TMP = $(shell mktemp -d testruleB_XXXX)
ruleB: display

display:
    echo ${TMP}

Running the code produces the expected result:

$ ls
Makefile
$ make ruleB
echo testruleB_Y4Ow
testruleB_Y4Ow
$ ls
Makefile  testruleB_Y4Ow
  • Just as a reminder, GNU make has a syntax for order-only prerequisites which may be necessary to complement this approach. – anol Jun 5 '14 at 19:24
  • 7
    Be careful with this solution! ruleA: TMP = $(shell mktemp -d testruleA_XXXX) and ruleB: TMP = $(shell mktemp -d testruleB_XXXX) will happen when the Makefile is first evaluated. In other words, ruleA: TMP = $(shell ... happens sooner than you think. While this might work for this particular case, this method will cause problems for some sequential operations. – JamesThomasMoon1979 Jun 11 '15 at 2:55

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.