4

I have a very simple c code:

         #include<stdio.h>
        int main()
        {
          enum boolean{true,false};
          boolean bl=false;
          if(bl==false)
             printf("This is the false value of boool\n");
         boolean bl1=true;
          if(bl1==true)
           {
            printf("This is the true value of boool\n");
           }
    return 0;
   }

i was just trying to use enum type variable .but it is giving following error:

tryit4.c:5: error: ‘boolean’ undeclared (first use in this function)
tryit4.c:5: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
tryit4.c:5: error: for each function it appears in.)
tryit4.c:5: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘bl’
tryit4.c:6: error: ‘bl’ undeclared (first use in this function)
tryit4.c:8: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘bl1’
tryit4.c:9: error: ‘bl1’ undeclared (first use in this function)

I don't see any reason for it. Can you please explain what could be the reason for it?

3
  • some gyz probably have too much free time and nothing better to do than get angry on the Internet. Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:44
  • @mawia: Click on your username, choose "activity" then go through all the questions you have asked and choose a best answer from each.
    – wallyk
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:48
  • It looks as if you can not compile it right. True and false are the keywords of C. You will get the error "cannot convert ‘bool’ to ‘main(int, const char**)::boolean’" in initialization.
    – wuranbo
    Commented Dec 18, 2012 at 4:40

7 Answers 7

11

In C, there are two (actually more, but i keep it at this) kind of namespaces: Ordinary identifiers, and tag identifiers. A struct, union or enum declaration introduces a tag identifier:

enum boolean { true, false };
enum boolean bl = false;

The namespace from which the identifier is chosen is specified by the syntax around. Here, it is prepended by a enum. If you want to introduce an ordinary identifier, put it inside a typedef declaration

typedef enum { true, false } boolean;
boolean bl = false;

Ordinary identifiers don't need special syntax. You may declare a tag and ordinary one too, if you like.

2
  • what would you say about the declaration style given for enum on page 39 in kernigham and richie. ex enum boolean {yes,no}.
    – mawia
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:52
  • @mawia: in enum boolean {yes, no} the name boolean is being used as a tag identifier. In typedef enum {true, false} boolean, the name boolean is being used as an ordinary identifier. It's a tag identifier if it comes right after enum or struct or union.
    – benzado
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:57
8

When you declare enum boolean { true, false }, you declare a type called enum boolean. That the name you'll have to use after that declaration: enum boolean, not just boolean.

If you want a shorter name (like just boolean), you'll have to define it as an alias for the original full name

typedef enum boolean boolean;

If you wish, you can declare both the enum boolean type and the boolean alias on one declaration

typedef enum boolean { true, false } boolean;
7

You have to declare the variables to be of type enum boolean, not just boolean. Use typedef, if you find writing enum boolean b1 = foo(); cumbersome.

7

It would really be a good idea to define your enum like this:

typedef enum {
  False,
  True,
} boolean;

A couple of reasons:

  • true and false (lowercase) are likely reserved words
  • false being 1 and true being 0 can cause you logic problems later
1
  • 2
    +1 for catching the problem with defining them in the other order.
    – qid
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 21:04
3

You declare the enum, but not the type. What you want is

typedef enum{false, true} boolean;  // false = 0 is expected by most programmers

There are still multiple problems with this:
* true and false are reserved words in many C compilers
* explicitly using true and false goes against the general practice of Boolean expressions in C, where zero means false and anything non-zero means true. For example:

int found = (a == b);


Edit: This works with gcc 4.1.2:

[wally@zf ~]$ ./a.out
This is the false value of boool
This is the true value of boool
[wally@zf ~]$ cat t2.c
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
        typedef enum {true,false} boolean;
        boolean bl=false;
        if(bl==false)
                printf("This is the false value of boool\n");
        boolean bl1=true;
        if(bl1==true)
        {
                printf("This is the true value of boool\n");
        }
        return 0;
}
3
  • The first issue can be worked-around by adding underscore prefix, or something. Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:47
  • thanks for reply, hey unfortunately problem persisted even after typedefining the enum.
    – mawia
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:47
  • yeah prog compiled perfectly on typedef like typedef enum{false,true} boolean; but what would you say to the style given on page 39 of kernigham and richie of declaring an enum!
    – mawia
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:53
1

Like previous answers demonstrate, use typedef:

typedef enum { true, false } boolean;
1
  • 7
    If there are previous answers, to what benefit is there adding a duplicate answer?
    – GManNickG
    Commented Dec 15, 2009 at 19:48
0

From FAQ - A list of features that C++ supports which C does not includes:

bool keyword

That FAQ is a little inaccurate, and is better stated as "a list of features that C++ supports which C89 does not include"

Add #include <stdbool.h> to your code and it will compile as C99 on a compiler that attempts to implement C99 (such as gcc).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.