1

I'm using this code to submit a form to a php script:

var valid = 'true';
$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#contact").submit(function(){
    $.post("process.php",
      $("#contact").serialize(),
      function(data){
        if(data.email_check == 'invalid'){
          valid = 'false'; //<---not set!
          $("#email1").addClass('missing'); 
          $("#message_ajax")
            .html("<div class='errorMessage'>Sorry is NOT a valid e-mail address. Try again.</div>");
        } else {
          $("#message_ajax")
            .html("<div class='errorMessage'>YES! this is A valid e-mail address. DO NOT Try again.</div>");
        }
      }, "json"
    );

    if(valid == 'true'){
      $("#contact").hide();
    }

    return false;
  });
});

I know the script is returning the 'invalid' value because the div and css are updated as expected, but the 'valid' variable never gets set to 'false'. Thinking it was a scope issue I have moved the declaration and if statement around with no joy.

Possible related problem - I'm using firebug to step through the code, but it only stops at my breakpoint the first time the code is executed, and never again, but I can submit the form any number of times and it always responds as expected - valid or invalid. As you can see, I'm very new to jQuery.

6

You're mixing synchronous and asynchronous code here.

if(valid == 'true'){
    $("#contact").hide();
}       

return false;

This code ^^^ runs before the callback function(data) is ever called.

Basically what's happening is this:

  • $.post runs
  • if(valid == 'true') is evaluated
  • .submit() function returns false
  • The callback function(data) is called
  • 'valid' variable is set
  • +1 thanks. So if I understand, I need to put the logic that hides the form in the function(data) block? Eventually I will have several inputs to validate and I only want to hide the form if all pass. – jriggs Dec 15 '09 at 20:00
  • @jriggs -- Yes, exactly. Keep in mind there will be a delay between the $.post and the function(data), so you might also want to add a little message asking the user to wait, and then hide that after the callback is fired. – T. Stone Dec 15 '09 at 20:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.