I threw some code together to flatten and un-flatten complex/nested JSON objects. It works, but it's a bit slow (triggers the 'long script' warning).

For the flattened names I want "." as the delimiter and [INDEX] for arrays.

Examples:

un-flattened | flattened
---------------------------
{foo:{bar:false}} => {"foo.bar":false}
{a:[{b:["c","d"]}]} => {"a[0].b[0]":"c","a[0].b[1]":"d"}
[1,[2,[3,4],5],6] => {"[0]":1,"[1].[0]":2,"[1].[1].[0]":3,"[1].[1].[1]":4,"[1].[2]":5,"[2]":6}

I created a benchmark that ~simulates my use case http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/

  • Get a nested JSON object
  • Flatten it
  • Look through it and possibly modify it while flattened
  • Unflatten it back to it's original nested format to be shipped away

I would like faster code: For clarification, code that completes the JSFiddle benchmark (http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/) significantly faster (~20%+ would be nice) in IE 9+, FF 24+, and Chrome 29+.

Here's the relevant JavaScript code: Current Fastest: http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/6/

JSON.unflatten = function(data) {
    "use strict";
    if (Object(data) !== data || Array.isArray(data))
        return data;
    var result = {}, cur, prop, idx, last, temp;
    for(var p in data) {
        cur = result, prop = "", last = 0;
        do {
            idx = p.indexOf(".", last);
            temp = p.substring(last, idx !== -1 ? idx : undefined);
            cur = cur[prop] || (cur[prop] = (!isNaN(parseInt(temp)) ? [] : {}));
            prop = temp;
            last = idx + 1;
        } while(idx >= 0);
        cur[prop] = data[p];
    }
    return result[""];
}
JSON.flatten = function(data) {
    var result = {};
    function recurse (cur, prop) {
        if (Object(cur) !== cur) {
            result[prop] = cur;
        } else if (Array.isArray(cur)) {
             for(var i=0, l=cur.length; i<l; i++)
                 recurse(cur[i], prop ? prop+"."+i : ""+i);
            if (l == 0)
                result[prop] = [];
        } else {
            var isEmpty = true;
            for (var p in cur) {
                isEmpty = false;
                recurse(cur[p], prop ? prop+"."+p : p);
            }
            if (isEmpty)
                result[prop] = {};
        }
    }
    recurse(data, "");
    return result;
}

EDIT 1 Modified the above to @Bergi 's implementation which is currently the fastest. As an aside, using ".indexOf" instead of "regex.exec" is around 20% faster in FF but 20% slower in Chrome; so I'll stick with the regex since it's simpler (here's my attempt at using indexOf to replace the regex http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/2/).

EDIT 2 Building on @Bergi 's idea I managed to created a faster non-regex version (3x faster in FF and ~10% faster in Chrome). http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/6/ In the this (the current) implementation the rules for key names are simply, keys cannot start with an integer or contain a period.

Example:

  • {"foo":{"bar":[0]}} => {"foo.bar.0":0}

EDIT 3 Adding @AaditMShah 's inline path parsing approach (rather than String.split) helped to improve the unflatten performance. I'm very happy with the overall performance improvement reached.

The latest jsfiddle and jsperf:

http://jsfiddle.net/WSzec/14/

http://jsperf.com/flatten-un-flatten/4

  • 5
    There is no such thing as a "JSON object". The question seems to be about JS objects. – Felix Kling Sep 30 '13 at 16:08
  • 1
    This question seems to be more appropriate for the Code Review StackExchange site: codereview.stackexchange.com – Aadit M Shah Sep 30 '13 at 16:17
  • 5
    @FelixKling - By JSON object I meant JS objects that only contain primitive JavaScript types. You could, for instance, put an function in a JS object, but it would not be serialized into JSON -- i.e. JSON.stringify({fn:function(){alert('a');}}); -- – Louis Ricci Sep 30 '13 at 16:19
  • 2
    [1].[1].[0] looks wrong to me. Are you sure this is the desired result? – Bergi Sep 30 '13 at 16:25
  • 1
    There's a bug unfortunately: Date objects are converted to an empty JSON. – giacecco Mar 28 '16 at 15:09

11 Answers 11

up vote 165 down vote accepted
+500

Here's my much shorter implementation:

Object.unflatten = function(data) {
    "use strict";
    if (Object(data) !== data || Array.isArray(data))
        return data;
    var regex = /\.?([^.\[\]]+)|\[(\d+)\]/g,
        resultholder = {};
    for (var p in data) {
        var cur = resultholder,
            prop = "",
            m;
        while (m = regex.exec(p)) {
            cur = cur[prop] || (cur[prop] = (m[2] ? [] : {}));
            prop = m[2] || m[1];
        }
        cur[prop] = data[p];
    }
    return resultholder[""] || resultholder;
};

flatten hasn't changed much (and I'm not sure whether you really need those isEmpty cases):

Object.flatten = function(data) {
    var result = {};
    function recurse (cur, prop) {
        if (Object(cur) !== cur) {
            result[prop] = cur;
        } else if (Array.isArray(cur)) {
             for(var i=0, l=cur.length; i<l; i++)
                 recurse(cur[i], prop + "[" + i + "]");
            if (l == 0)
                result[prop] = [];
        } else {
            var isEmpty = true;
            for (var p in cur) {
                isEmpty = false;
                recurse(cur[p], prop ? prop+"."+p : p);
            }
            if (isEmpty && prop)
                result[prop] = {};
        }
    }
    recurse(data, "");
    return result;
}

Together, they run your benchmark in about the half of the time (Opera 12.16: ~900ms instead of ~ 1900ms, Chrome 29: ~800ms instead of ~1600ms).

  • 1
    This is great! The regex runs remarkably well (especially in Chrome), I tried replacing it with indexOf logic, but was only able to realize a speed-up in FF. I'll be adding a bounty to this question to see if another clever improvement can be stirred up, but so far this is more than what I was hoping for. – Louis Ricci Oct 1 '13 at 20:50
  • I managed to grind more speed out of your implementation by replacing the regex.exec() with string.split() and simplifying the key format. I'll give it a few days before I award you the pts, but I think the 'wall of meaningful optimization' has been reached. – Louis Ricci Oct 5 '13 at 21:52
  • JSON.flatten({}); // { '': {} } -- you could add a line after var result = {}; -- if (result === data) return data; – Ivan Nov 29 '13 at 21:20
  • @Ivan: Ah, thanks for that edge case, though semantically it actually would be required to have an extra representation for empty objects. But no, result === data won't work, they're never identical. – Bergi Nov 30 '13 at 12:29
  • @Bergi Yeah you're right. Object.keys(data).length === 0 works though – Ivan Dec 5 '13 at 1:43

I wrote two functions to flatten and unflatten a JSON object.


Flatten a JSON object:

var flatten = (function (isArray, wrapped) {
    return function (table) {
        return reduce("", {}, table);
    };

    function reduce(path, accumulator, table) {
        if (isArray(table)) {
            var length = table.length;

            if (length) {
                var index = 0;

                while (index < length) {
                    var property = path + "[" + index + "]", item = table[index++];
                    if (wrapped(item) !== item) accumulator[property] = item;
                    else reduce(property, accumulator, item);
                }
            } else accumulator[path] = table;
        } else {
            var empty = true;

            if (path) {
                for (var property in table) {
                    var item = table[property], property = path + "." + property, empty = false;
                    if (wrapped(item) !== item) accumulator[property] = item;
                    else reduce(property, accumulator, item);
                }
            } else {
                for (var property in table) {
                    var item = table[property], empty = false;
                    if (wrapped(item) !== item) accumulator[property] = item;
                    else reduce(property, accumulator, item);
                }
            }

            if (empty) accumulator[path] = table;
        }

        return accumulator;
    }
}(Array.isArray, Object));

Performance:

  1. It's faster than the current solution in Opera. The current solution is 26% slower in Opera.
  2. It's faster than the current solution in Firefox. The current solution is 9% slower in Firefox.
  3. It's faster than the current solution in Chrome. The current solution is 29% slower in Chrome.

Unflatten a JSON object:

function unflatten(table) {
    var result = {};

    for (var path in table) {
        var cursor = result, length = path.length, property = "", index = 0;

        while (index < length) {
            var char = path.charAt(index);

            if (char === "[") {
                var start = index + 1,
                    end = path.indexOf("]", start),
                    cursor = cursor[property] = cursor[property] || [],
                    property = path.slice(start, end),
                    index = end + 1;
            } else {
                var cursor = cursor[property] = cursor[property] || {},
                    start = char === "." ? index + 1 : index,
                    bracket = path.indexOf("[", start),
                    dot = path.indexOf(".", start);

                if (bracket < 0 && dot < 0) var end = index = length;
                else if (bracket < 0) var end = index = dot;
                else if (dot < 0) var end = index = bracket;
                else var end = index = bracket < dot ? bracket : dot;

                var property = path.slice(start, end);
            }
        }

        cursor[property] = table[path];
    }

    return result[""];
}

Performance:

  1. It's faster than the current solution in Opera. The current solution is 5% slower in Opera.
  2. It's slower than the current solution in Firefox. My solution is 26% slower in Firefox.
  3. It's slower than the current solution in Chrome. My solution is 6% slower in Chrome.

Flatten and unflatten a JSON object:

Overall my solution performs either equally well or even better than the current solution.

Performance:

  1. It's faster than the current solution in Opera. The current solution is 21% slower in Opera.
  2. It's as fast as the current solution in Firefox.
  3. It's faster than the current solution in Firefox. The current solution is 20% slower in Chrome.

Output format:

A flattened object uses the dot notation for object properties and the bracket notation for array indices:

  1. {foo:{bar:false}} => {"foo.bar":false}
  2. {a:[{b:["c","d"]}]} => {"a[0].b[0]":"c","a[0].b[1]":"d"}
  3. [1,[2,[3,4],5],6] => {"[0]":1,"[1][0]":2,"[1][1][0]":3,"[1][1][1]":4,"[1][2]":5,"[2]":6}

In my opinion this format is better than only using the dot notation:

  1. {foo:{bar:false}} => {"foo.bar":false}
  2. {a:[{b:["c","d"]}]} => {"a.0.b.0":"c","a.0.b.1":"d"}
  3. [1,[2,[3,4],5],6] => {"0":1,"1.0":2,"1.1.0":3,"1.1.1":4,"1.2":5,"2":6}

Advantages:

  1. Flattening an object is faster than the current solution.
  2. Flattening and unflattening an object is as fast as or faster than the current solution.
  3. Flattened objects use both the dot notation and the bracket notation for readability.

Disadvantages:

  1. Unflattening an object is slower than the current solution in most (but not all) cases.

The current JSFiddle demo gave the following values as output:

Nested : 132175 : 63
Flattened : 132175 : 564
Nested : 132175 : 54
Flattened : 132175 : 508

My updated JSFiddle demo gave the following values as output:

Nested : 132175 : 59
Flattened : 132175 : 514
Nested : 132175 : 60
Flattened : 132175 : 451

I'm not really sure what that means, so I'll stick with the jsPerf results. After all jsPerf is a performance benchmarking utility. JSFiddle is not.

  • Very cool. I really like the style for flatten, using anonymous functions to get Array.isArray and Object into a closer scope. I think the the test object your using for the JSPerf test is too simple though. I created the object "fillObj({},4)" in my jsfiddle benchmark to emulate a real case of a large complex nested piece of data. – Louis Ricci Oct 6 '13 at 15:04
  • Show me the code for your object and I'll incorporate it into the benchmark. – Aadit M Shah Oct 6 '13 at 15:08
  • jsperf.com/flatten-un-flatten here's the jsperf I put together. – Louis Ricci Oct 6 '13 at 15:29
  • 2
    @LastCoder Hmmm, your current implementation seems to be faster than mine in most browsers (notably Firefox). Interestingly my implementation is faster in Opera and it's not so bad in Chrome either. I don't think having such a large data set is an ideal factor to determine the speed of the algorithm because: 1) large data sets need a large amount of memory, page swapping, etc.; and that's not something you can control in JS (i.e. you're at the mercy of the browser) 2) if you want to do CPU intensive work then JS is not the best language. Consider using C instead. There are JSON libraries for C – Aadit M Shah Oct 6 '13 at 16:51
  • 1
    that's a good point and brings up the difference between synthetic vs real world benchmarking. I'm happy with the performance of the current optimized JS, so no need to use C. – Louis Ricci Oct 7 '13 at 13:54

Based on @Bergi's code I made a simple webpage to flatten // unflatten.

http://fiddle.jshell.net/blowsie/S2hsS/show/light/

enter image description here

JSON.flatten = function (data) {
    var result = {};

    function recurse(cur, prop) {
        if (Object(cur) !== cur) {
            result[prop] = cur;
        } else if (Array.isArray(cur)) {
            for (var i = 0, l = cur.length; i < l; i++)
            recurse(cur[i], prop + "[" + i + "]");
            if (l == 0) result[prop] = [];
        } else {
            var isEmpty = true;
            for (var p in cur) {
                isEmpty = false;
                recurse(cur[p], prop ? prop + "." + p : p);
            }
            if (isEmpty && prop) result[prop] = {};
        }
    }
    recurse(data, "");
    return result;
};
JSON.unflatten = function (data) {
    "use strict";
    if (Object(data) !== data || Array.isArray(data)) return data;
    var regex = /\.?([^.\[\]]+)|\[(\d+)\]/g,
        resultholder = {};
    for (var p in data) {
        var cur = resultholder,
            prop = "",
            m;
        while (m = regex.exec(p)) {
            cur = cur[prop] || (cur[prop] = (m[2] ? [] : {}));
            prop = m[2] || m[1];
        }
        cur[prop] = data[p];
    }
    return resultholder[""] || resultholder;
};


$("#process").click(function () {
    var flatten = $("#flatten").is(":checked");

    var result = flatten ? JSON.stringify(JSON.flatten(JSON.parse($("#input").val())), null, "\t") : JSON.stringify(JSON.unflatten(JSON.parse($("#input").val())), null, "\t")

    $("#output").val(result);
    $("#formatted").text(result);
});
body {
    padding:20px;
}
<link href="http://netdna.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.1.1/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
<h1>JSON Flattener</h1>

<div class="form-group">
    <label>Mode:</label>
    <label class="radio-inline">
        <input id="flatten" name="mode" type="radio" value="flatten" checked="">Flatten</label>
    <label class="radio-inline">
        <input name="mode" type="radio" value="unflatten">Unflatten</label>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <label>Input:</label>
    <input class="form-control" type="text" name="" id="input">
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <label>Output:</label>
    <textarea class="form-control" name="" id="output" cols="30" rows="5"></textarea>
</div>
<button id="process" class="btn btn-primary">Process</button>
<br/>
<br/>
<label>Formatted:</label>
<pre><code id="formatted"></code></pre>

  • 1
    Credit to @Bergi for his code. – Blowsie Apr 3 '14 at 11:45
  • 8
    This should be a comment, not an answer – Trent Bing Oct 2 '15 at 8:32
  • As it includes the full code on this site, I disagree. This shows a way to implement the code needed to flatten JSON, and thus, is an answer. If it was just a link, I'd agree. – Erik von Asmuth Jun 12 at 9:40
  • @ErikvonAsmuth the full code you are referring here are the JS code from Bergi's answer and some html+css wrapper for hosting it. If the question is not an offsite tool request, then this is not an answer. – Munim Munna Jun 12 at 15:41
  • Yes, it copies nearly all code from an existing answer. But it attributes, so that's allowed. And yes, it adds very little. But the definition of NAA is very, very narrow. Any attempt to answer, however bad, is an answer, except link-only answers. And since the answer shares more than a link, it's not link-only. – Erik von Asmuth Jun 12 at 15:46

Here's another approach that runs slower (about 1000ms) than the above answer, but has an interesting idea :-)

Instead of iterating through each property chain, it just picks the last property and uses a look-up-table for the rest to store the intermediate results. This look-up-table will be iterated until there are no property chains left and all values reside on uncocatenated properties.

JSON.unflatten = function(data) {
    "use strict";
    if (Object(data) !== data || Array.isArray(data))
        return data;
    var regex = /\.?([^.\[\]]+)$|\[(\d+)\]$/,
        props = Object.keys(data),
        result, p;
    while(p = props.shift()) {
        var m = regex.exec(p),
            target;
        if (m.index) {
            var rest = p.slice(0, m.index);
            if (!(rest in data)) {
                data[rest] = m[2] ? [] : {};
                props.push(rest);
            }
            target = data[rest];
        } else {
            target = result || (result = (m[2] ? [] : {}));
        }
        target[m[2] || m[1]] = data[p];
    }
    return result;
};

It currently uses the data input parameter for the table, and puts lots of properties on it - a non-destructive version should be possible as well. Maybe a clever lastIndexOf usage performs better than the regex (depends on the regex engine).

See it in action here.

  • What's the downvote for? – Bergi Oct 6 '13 at 15:08
  • I didn't downvote your answer. However I would like to point out that your function doesn't unflatten the flattened object correctly. For example consider the array [1,[2,[3,4],5],6]. Your flatten function flattens this object to {"[0]":1,"[1][0]":2,"[1][1][0]":3,"[1][1][1]":4,"[1][2]":5,"[2]":6}. Your unflatten function however incorrectly unflattens the flattened object to [1,[null,[3,4]],6]. The reason this happens is because of the statement delete data[p] which prematurely deletes the intermediate value [2,null,5] before [3,4] is added to it. Use a stack to solve it. :-) – Aadit M Shah Oct 6 '13 at 16:30
  • 1
    Ah, I see, undefined enumeration order… Gonna fix it with a queue of properties, please put your stack solution in an own answer. Thanks for the hint! – Bergi Oct 6 '13 at 18:22

3 ½ Years later...

For my own project I wanted to flatten JSON objects in mongoDB dot notation and came up with a simple solution:

/**
 * Recursively flattens a JSON object using dot notation.
 *
 * NOTE: input must be an object as described by JSON spec. Arbitrary
 * JS objects (e.g. {a: () => 42}) may result in unexpected output.
 * MOREOVER, it removes keys with empty objects/arrays as value (see
 * examples bellow).
 *
 * @example
 * // returns {a:1, 'b.0.c': 2, 'b.0.d.e': 3, 'b.1': 4}
 * flatten({a: 1, b: [{c: 2, d: {e: 3}}, 4]})
 * // returns {a:1, 'b.0.c': 2, 'b.0.d.e.0': true, 'b.0.d.e.1': false, 'b.0.d.e.2.f': 1}
 * flatten({a: 1, b: [{c: 2, d: {e: [true, false, {f: 1}]}}]})
 * // return {a: 1}
 * flatten({a: 1, b: [], c: {}})
 *
 * @param obj item to be flattened
 * @param {Array.string} [prefix=[]] chain of prefix joined with a dot and prepended to key
 * @param {Object} [current={}] result of flatten during the recursion
 *
 * @see https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/core/document/#dot-notation
 */
function flatten (obj, prefix, current) {
  prefix = prefix || []
  current = current || {}

  // Remember kids, null is also an object!
  if (typeof (obj) === 'object' && obj !== null) {
    Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
      this.flatten(obj[key], prefix.concat(key), current)
    })
  } else {
    current[prefix.join('.')] = obj
  }

  return current
}

Features and/or caveats

  • It only accepts JSON objects. So if you pass something like {a: () => {}} you might not get what you wanted!
  • It removes empty arrays and objects. So this {a: {}, b: []} is flattened to {}.

ES6 version:

const flatten = (obj, path = '') => {        
    if (!(obj instanceof Object)) return {[path.replace(/\.$/g, '')]:obj};

    return Object.keys(obj).reduce((output, key) => {
        return obj instanceof Array ? 
             {...output, ...flatten(obj[key], path +  '[' + key + '].')}:
             {...output, ...flatten(obj[key], path + key + '.')};
    }, {});
}

Example:

console.log(flatten({a:[{b:["c","d"]}]}));
console.log(flatten([1,[2,[3,4],5],6]));
  • I think you'd have some difficulty UNflattening if you don't have separators between the property names JSON.stringify(flatten({"prop1":0,"prop2":{"prop3":true,"prop4":"test"}})); ==> {"prop1":0,"prop2prop3":true,"prop2prop4":"test"} but but's an easy fix, the brevity of the ES6 syntax is really nice – Louis Ricci Mar 1 at 19:44
  • That is very true, separators added – Guy Mar 2 at 3:40
  • This doesn't play nicely with Date, any idea how to get it to do that? For example, with flatten({a: {b: new Date()}}); – Ehtesh Choudhury Sep 22 at 2:01
  • You could use timestamps: {b: new Date().getTime()}} and later return it to date with new Date(timestamp) – Guy Sep 22 at 13:35

This code recursively flattens out JSON objects.

I included my timing mechanism in the code and it gives me 1ms but I'm not sure if that's the most accurate one.

            var new_json = [{
              "name": "fatima",
              "age": 25,
              "neighbour": {
                "name": "taqi",
                "location": "end of the street",
                "property": {
                  "built in": 1990,
                  "owned": false,
                  "years on market": [1990, 1998, 2002, 2013],
                  "year short listed": [], //means never
                }
              },
              "town": "Mountain View",
              "state": "CA"
            },
            {
              "name": "qianru",
              "age": 20,
              "neighbour": {
                "name": "joe",
                "location": "opposite to the park",
                "property": {
                  "built in": 2011,
                  "owned": true,
                  "years on market": [1996, 2011],
                  "year short listed": [], //means never
                }
              },
              "town": "Pittsburgh",
              "state": "PA"
            }]

            function flatten(json, flattened, str_key) {
                for (var key in json) {
                  if (json.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                    if (json[key] instanceof Object && json[key] != "") {
                      flatten(json[key], flattened, str_key + "." + key);
                    } else {
                      flattened[str_key + "." + key] = json[key];
                    }
                  }
                }
            }

        var flattened = {};
        console.time('flatten'); 
        flatten(new_json, flattened, "");
        console.timeEnd('flatten');

        for (var key in flattened){
          console.log(key + ": " + flattened[key]);
        }

Output:

flatten: 1ms
.0.name: fatima
.0.age: 25
.0.neighbour.name: taqi
.0.neighbour.location: end of the street
.0.neighbour.property.built in: 1990
.0.neighbour.property.owned: false
.0.neighbour.property.years on market.0: 1990
.0.neighbour.property.years on market.1: 1998
.0.neighbour.property.years on market.2: 2002
.0.neighbour.property.years on market.3: 2013
.0.neighbour.property.year short listed: 
.0.town: Mountain View
.0.state: CA
.1.name: qianru
.1.age: 20
.1.neighbour.name: joe
.1.neighbour.location: opposite to the park
.1.neighbour.property.built in: 2011
.1.neighbour.property.owned: true
.1.neighbour.property.years on market.0: 1996
.1.neighbour.property.years on market.1: 2011
.1.neighbour.property.year short listed: 
.1.town: Pittsburgh
.1.state: PA
  • I think, that typeof some === 'object' is faster then some instanceof Object since the first check performs in O1 while second in On where n is a length of an inheritance chain (Object will always be the last one there). – GullerYA Apr 1 '16 at 11:20

You can use https://github.com/hughsk/flat

Take a nested Javascript object and flatten it, or unflatten an object with delimited keys.

Example from the doc

var flatten = require('flat')

flatten({
    key1: {
        keyA: 'valueI'
    },
    key2: {
        keyB: 'valueII'
    },
    key3: { a: { b: { c: 2 } } }
})

// {
//   'key1.keyA': 'valueI',
//   'key2.keyB': 'valueII',
//   'key3.a.b.c': 2
// }


var unflatten = require('flat').unflatten

unflatten({
    'three.levels.deep': 42,
    'three.levels': {
        nested: true
    }
})

// {
//     three: {
//         levels: {
//             deep: 42,
//             nested: true
//         }
//     }
// }
  • How do you use this in AngularJS? – kensplanet Feb 6 at 22:08

I added +/- 10-15% efficiency to the selected answer by minor code refactoring and moving the recursive function outside of the function namespace.

See my question: Are namespaced functions reevaluated on every call? for why this slows nested functions down.

function _flatten (target, obj, path) {
  var i, empty;
  if (obj.constructor === Object) {
    empty = true;
    for (i in obj) {
      empty = false;
      _flatten(target, obj[i], path ? path + '.' + i : i);
    }
    if (empty && path) {
      target[path] = {};
    }
  } 
  else if (obj.constructor === Array) {
    i = obj.length;
    if (i > 0) {
      while (i--) {
        _flatten(target, obj[i], path + '[' + i + ']');
      }
    } else {
      target[path] = [];
    }
  }
  else {
    target[path] = obj;
  }
}

function flatten (data) {
  var result = {};
  _flatten(result, data, null);
  return result;
}

See benchmark.

Here's mine. It runs in <2ms in Google Apps Script on a sizable object. It uses dashes instead of dots for separators, and it doesn't handle arrays specially like in the asker's question, but this is what I wanted for my use.

function flatten (obj) {
  var newObj = {};
  for (var key in obj) {
    if (typeof obj[key] === 'object' && obj[key] !== null) {
      var temp = flatten(obj[key])
      for (var key2 in temp) {
        newObj[key+"-"+key2] = temp[key2];
      }
    } else {
      newObj[key] = obj[key];
    }
  }
  return newObj;
}

Example:

var test = {
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: {
    c1: 3.1,
    c2: 3.2
  },
  d: 4,
  e: {
    e1: 5.1,
    e2: 5.2,
    e3: {
      e3a: 5.31,
      e3b: 5.32
    },
    e4: 5.4
  },
  f: 6
}

Logger.log("start");
Logger.log(JSON.stringify(flatten(test),null,2));
Logger.log("done");

Example output:

[17-02-08 13:21:05:245 CST] start
[17-02-08 13:21:05:246 CST] {
  "a": 1,
  "b": 2,
  "c-c1": 3.1,
  "c-c2": 3.2,
  "d": 4,
  "e-e1": 5.1,
  "e-e2": 5.2,
  "e-e3-e3a": 5.31,
  "e-e3-e3b": 5.32,
  "e-e4": 5.4,
  "f": 6
}
[17-02-08 13:21:05:247 CST] done

I'd like to add a new version of flatten case (this is what i needed :)) which, according to my probes with the above jsFiddler, is slightly faster then the currently selected one. Moreover, me personally see this snippet a bit more readable, which is of course important for multi-developer projects.

function flattenObject(graph) {
    let result = {},
        item,
        key;

    function recurr(graph, path) {
        if (Array.isArray(graph)) {
            graph.forEach(function (itm, idx) {
                key = path + '[' + idx + ']';
                if (itm && typeof itm === 'object') {
                    recurr(itm, key);
                } else {
                    result[key] = itm;
                }
            });
        } else {
            Reflect.ownKeys(graph).forEach(function (p) {
                key = path + '.' + p;
                item = graph[p];
                if (item && typeof item === 'object') {
                    recurr(item, key);
                } else {
                    result[key] = item;
                }
            });
        }
    }
    recurr(graph, '');

    return result;
}

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