I am using Xcode 5's Asset Catalog, and I would like to use my LaunchImage as the background image of my home view (a pretty common practice to make the transition from 'loading' to 'loaded' look smooth).

I would like to use the same entry in the Asset Catalog to save space and not have to replicate the image in two different Image Sets.

However, calling:

UIImage *image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"LaunchImage"]; //returns nil

13 Answers 13

This is the (almost) complete list of the LaunchImage (excluding the iPad images with no status bar):

  • LaunchImage-568h@2x.png
  • LaunchImage-700-568h@2x.png
  • LaunchImage-700-Landscape@2x~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-700-Landscape~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-700-Portrait@2x~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-700-Portrait~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-700@2x.png
  • LaunchImage-Landscape@2x~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-Landscape~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-Portrait@2x~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage-Portrait~ipad.png
  • LaunchImage.png
  • LaunchImage@2x.png
  • LaunchImage-800-667h@2x.png (iPhone 6)
  • LaunchImage-800-Portrait-736h@3x.png (iPhone 6 Plus Portrait)
  • LaunchImage-800-Landscape-736h@3x.png (iPhone 6 Plus Landscape)
  • LaunchImage-1100-Portrait-2436h@3x.png (iPhone X Portrait)
  • LaunchImage-1100-Landscape-2436h@3x.png (iPhone X Landscape)
  • 2
    LaunchImage-800-Portrait-736h@3x.png does not work for me – Awesomeness Sep 12 '14 at 19:46
  • Anybody know the iPad images with no status bar? – Mohamed Hafez Sep 28 '14 at 7:50
  • 1
    @Mohamed Hafez: Pichirichi does actually have them included in his list. They are LaunchImage-Portrait~ipad.png, LaunchImage-Portrait@2x~ipad.png, LaunchImage-Landscape~ipad.png, and LaunchImage-Landscape@2x~ipad.png. – John Jacecko Sep 29 '14 at 18:47
  • 2
    I catched it: it means iOS 7 & 8 – Sound Blaster Oct 5 '14 at 20:40
  • 3
    It's incredibly annoying that XCode will automatically create a file name for these image assets and make you jump through hoops to figure out how to directly access them... – Mr. T Oct 21 '14 at 3:55
- (NSString *)splashImageNameForOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)orientation {
    CGSize viewSize = self.view.bounds.size;
    NSString* viewOrientation = @"Portrait";
    if (UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape(orientation)) {
        viewSize = CGSizeMake(viewSize.height, viewSize.width);
        viewOrientation = @"Landscape";
    }

    NSArray* imagesDict = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] infoDictionary] valueForKey:@"UILaunchImages"];
    for (NSDictionary* dict in imagesDict) {
        CGSize imageSize = CGSizeFromString(dict[@"UILaunchImageSize"]);
        if (CGSizeEqualToSize(imageSize, viewSize) && [viewOrientation isEqualToString:dict[@"UILaunchImageOrientation"]])
            return dict[@"UILaunchImageName"];
    }
    return nil;
}
  • 1
    Works great. Clever and elegant approach to search main bundle's info dictionary for available launch images and then picking the one with matching resolution! – iOSX Jan 13 '15 at 20:36
  • 1
    This is a brilliant idea, better than mine and also future proof, unless Apple change the structure of info.plist. – nonamelive Feb 16 '15 at 19:24
  • 1
    This is a very clever solution. I have multiple targets in my Xcode projects and just using the LaunchImage string does not always return the correct image. Thanks a lot. – Enrico Susatyo Apr 29 '15 at 10:36
  • 3
    Brilliant idea though. But does not work for screens with opaque status bar. So needed to change self.view.bounds.size to [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size – RamaKrishna Chunduri Dec 11 '15 at 14:10
  • 1
    Great Solution. Small edit required: There's an implicit conversion from UIInterfaceOrientation to UIDeviceOrientation. Use UIInterfaceOrientationIsLandscape() instead. – Almog C Apr 30 '17 at 22:26

The LaunchImages are special, and aren't actually an asset catalog on the device. If you look using iFunBox/iExplorer/etc (or on the simulator, or in the build directory) you can see the final names, and then write code to use them - eg. for an iOS7-only iPhone-only project, this will set the right launch image:

NSString *launchImage;
if  ((UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) &&
     ([UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height > 480.0f)) {
    launchImage = @"LaunchImage-700-568h";
} else {
    launchImage = @"LaunchImage-700";
}

[self.launchImageView setImage:[UIImage imageNamed:launchImage]];

I put this into viewDidLoad.

This isn't really ideal, it would be great if Apple would give us a nice API to do this.

  • 2
    This worked for me, but I really wish there was a simpler way of referencing the launch image. – Zorayr Nov 7 '13 at 22:57
  • Maybe fixed in Xcode 5.0.2 - see below, seems to work for me simply to reference "LaunchImage.png" – Adam Nov 20 '13 at 12:40
  • 1
    @Adam Would love if that was true! I've just tried on iphone5s/xcode5.0.2/ios7.0.4, [UIImage imageNamed:@"LaunchImage.png"] gives me nil. – JosephH Nov 20 '13 at 17:29
  • @JosephH hmm. Maybe it requires a newly created project? This is a project created in Xcode 5.0.2, only change to defaults was "disabled ARC". It's working great :). I'll see if I can find anything else, but can't think what else I might have changed – Adam Nov 20 '13 at 17:41
  • I was trying similar code but using "Default" and "Default-568h" (the original resource file names). After looking inside the exported app bundle, I realized that Xcode changes the names to "LaunchImage-700*". – Nicolas Miari Jun 12 '14 at 3:47

My app currently only supports iOS 7 and later.

This is how I reference the launch image from the asset catalog:

NSDictionary *dict = @{@"320x480" : @"LaunchImage-700",
                       @"320x568" : @"LaunchImage-700-568h",
                       @"375x667" : @"LaunchImage-800-667h",
                       @"414x736" : @"LaunchImage-800-Portrait-736h"};
NSString *key = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%dx%d",
    (int)[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.width,
    (int)[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height];
UIImage *launchImage = [UIImage imageNamed:dict[key]];

You can add more key value pairs if you want to support older iOS versions.

  • 1
    Note that starting with iOS 8, UIScreen.mainScreen.bounds is different depending on the current interface orientation. See stackoverflow.com/a/24153540/158525 – Jean Regisser Sep 30 '14 at 9:22
  • 1
    Thanks for this, exactly what I was looking for! – Joseph Paterson Nov 23 '14 at 23:54
  • Thanks for htis, any method to access App Icons? – AsifHabib Dec 1 '15 at 13:00

Here a category on UIImage based on the solution provided by Cherpak Evgeny above.

UIImage+SplashImage.h:

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

/**
 * Category on `UIImage` to access the splash image.
 **/
@interface UIImage (SplashImage)

/**
 * Return the name of the splash image for a given orientation.
 * @param orientation The interface orientation.
 * @return The name of the splash image.
 **/
+ (NSString *)si_splashImageNameForOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)orientation;

/**
 * Returns the splash image for a given orientation.
 * @param orientation The interface orientation.
 * @return The splash image.
 **/
+ (UIImage*)si_splashImageForOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)orientation;

@end

UIImage+SplashImage.m:

#import "UIImage+SplashImage.h"

@implementation UIImage (SplashImage)

+ (NSString *)si_splashImageNameForOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)orientation
{
    CGSize viewSize = [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size;

    NSString *viewOrientation = @"Portrait";

    if (UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape(orientation))
    {
        viewSize = CGSizeMake(viewSize.height, viewSize.width);
        viewOrientation = @"Landscape";
    }

    NSArray* imagesDict = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] infoDictionary] valueForKey:@"UILaunchImages"];

    for (NSDictionary *dict in imagesDict)
    {
        CGSize imageSize = CGSizeFromString(dict[@"UILaunchImageSize"]);
        if (CGSizeEqualToSize(imageSize, viewSize) && [viewOrientation isEqualToString:dict[@"UILaunchImageOrientation"]])
            return dict[@"UILaunchImageName"];
    }
    return nil;
}

+ (UIImage*)si_splashImageForOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)orientation
{
    NSString *imageName = [self si_splashImageNameForOrientation:orientation];
    UIImage *image = [UIImage imageNamed:imageName];
    return image;
}

@end
  • 1
    Used this, worked like a charm. Thanks! – livingtech Aug 26 '15 at 20:49
  • imageNamed pushes image to system cache, but launch image sometimes is very huge, so it is in memory until cache flushes it – Igor Palaguta Nov 16 '15 at 13:14

@codeman's answer updated for Swift 1.2:

func splashImageForOrientation(orientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, size: CGSize) -> String? {
    var viewSize        = size
    var viewOrientation = "Portrait"

    if UIInterfaceOrientationIsLandscape(orientation) {
        viewSize        = CGSizeMake(size.height, size.width)
        viewOrientation = "Landscape"
    }

    if let imagesDict = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary as? [String: AnyObject] {
        if let imagesArray = imagesDict["UILaunchImages"] as? [[String: String]] {
            for dict in imagesArray {
                if let sizeString = dict["UILaunchImageSize"], let imageOrientation = dict["UILaunchImageOrientation"] {
                    let imageSize = CGSizeFromString(sizeString)
                    if CGSizeEqualToSize(imageSize, viewSize) && viewOrientation == imageOrientation {
                        if let imageName = dict["UILaunchImageName"] {
                            return imageName
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return nil

}

To call it, and to support rotation for iOS 8:

override func viewWillAppear(animated: Bool) {
    if let img = splashImageForOrientation(UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarOrientation, size: self.view.bounds.size) {
        backgroundImage.image = UIImage(named: img)
    }
}

override func viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    let orientation = size.height > size.width ? UIInterfaceOrientation.Portrait : UIInterfaceOrientation.LandscapeLeft

    if let img = splashImageForOrientation(orientation, size: size) {
        backgroundImage.image = UIImage(named: img)
    }

}

Just what I needed, thanks!

I just wrote a general method to get the splash image name for iPhone and iPad (Landscape, Portrait), It worked for me, Hope It helps you as well. I wrote this with help of other SO answers, thanks @Pichirichi for whole list.

+(NSString*)getLaunchImageName
{

 NSArray* images= @[@"LaunchImage.png", @"LaunchImage@2x.png",@"LaunchImage-700@2x.png",@"LaunchImage-568h@2x.png",@"LaunchImage-700-568h@2x.png",@"LaunchImage-700-Portrait@2x~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-Portrait@2x~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-700-Portrait~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-Portrait~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-Landscape@2x~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-700-Landscape@2x~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-Landscape~ipad.png",@"LaunchImage-700-Landscape~ipad.png"];

UIImage *splashImage;

if ([self isDeviceiPhone])
{
    if ([self isDeviceiPhone4] && [self isDeviceRetina])
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[1]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[1];
        else
            return images[2];
    }
    else if ([self isDeviceiPhone5])
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[1]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[3];
        else
            return images[4];
    }
    else
        return images[0]; //Non-retina iPhone
}
else if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation]==UIDeviceOrientationPortrait || [[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] == UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown)//iPad Portrait
{
    if ([self isDeviceRetina])
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[5]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[5];
        else
            return images[6];
    }
    else
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[7]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[7];
        else
            return images[8];
    }

}
else
{
    if ([self isDeviceRetina])
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[9]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[9];
        else
            return images[10];
    }
    else
    {
        splashImage = [UIImage imageNamed:images[11]];
        if (splashImage.size.width!=0)
            return images[11];
        else
            return images[12];
    }
 }
}

Other utility methods are

+(BOOL)isDeviceiPhone
{
 if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone)
 {
     return TRUE;
 }

 return FALSE;
}

+(BOOL)isDeviceiPhone4
{
 if ([[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height==480)
    return TRUE;

 return FALSE;
}


+(BOOL)isDeviceRetina
{
 if ([[UIScreen mainScreen] respondsToSelector:@selector(displayLinkWithTarget:selector:)] &&
    ([UIScreen mainScreen].scale == 2.0))        // Retina display
 {
    return TRUE;
 } 
 else                                          // non-Retina display
 {
     return FALSE;
 }
}


+(BOOL)isDeviceiPhone5
{
 if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height>480)
 {
    return TRUE;
 }
 return FALSE;
}
  • There's actually a slight bug in this code for isDeviceiPhone4: [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds] now changes based on what orientation you are in under iOS 8. You'll need to explicitly convert it to a portrait bounds doing something like: [screen.coordinateSpace convertRect:screen.bounds toCoordinateSpace:screen.fixedCoordinateSpace], but make sure to test if you are on iOS 8 first otherwise that will crash. – Mohamed Hafez Sep 30 '14 at 8:40
  • Thanks @Hafez for pointing that out, I will test it for iOS 8 and update the answer soon. – zaheer Sep 30 '14 at 9:24

Swift version of Cherpak Evgeny's answer:

    func splashImageForOrientation(orientation: UIInterfaceOrientation) -> String {
        var viewSize = self.view.bounds.size
        var viewOrientation = "Portrait"
        if UIInterfaceOrientationIsLandscape(orientation) {
           viewSize = CGSizeMake(viewSize.height, viewSize.width)
           viewOrientation = "Landscape"
        }
        let imagesDict = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary as Dictionary<NSObject,AnyObject>!
        let imagesArray = imagesDict["UILaunchImages"] as NSArray
        for dict in imagesArray {
            let dictNSDict = dict as NSDictionary
            let imageSize = CGSizeFromString(dictNSDict["UILaunchImageSize"] as String)
            if CGSizeEqualToSize(imageSize, viewSize) && viewOrientation == (dictNSDict["UILaunchImageOrientation"] as String) {
                return dictNSDict["UILaunchImageName"] as String
            }
        }
        return ""
    }

Following @Pichirich's answer, I referenced my launchimage in InterfaceBuilder as:

"LaunchImage.png"

...and with Xcode 5.0.2, it's automatically plucking the appropriate image straight out of the Asset Catalog.

This is what I'd expect - except for Apple's viciously nasty move of silently renaming "Default.png" to "LaunchImage.png" :)

  • One more thing should be noted. These images' sizes should be exactly like Apple recommends (320x480 for LaunchImage for iOS 5-6 iPhone 3GS for example), otherwise it would be nil after given initialisation – Alexander Kostiev Feb 11 '14 at 12:04

In the documentation there is clearly stated:

"Each set in an asset catalog has a name. You can use that name to programmatically load any individual image contained in the set. To load an image, call the UIImage:ImageNamed: method, passing the name of the set that contains the image."

Using Pichirichi's list helps to solve this inconsistency.

  • 1
    Note the "name of the set" part. Looking at my asset catalog, I have a set called "LaunchImage". To load the launch image, then, I called: UIImageView *myView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"LaunchImage"]]; Works great! – leanne Jul 3 '14 at 19:43
  • 1
    No need to use Pichirichi's list (thought that's still awesome info to know) - just use the name of the asset catalog's "set". – leanne Jul 3 '14 at 20:14
  • 2
    Well, for me this does not work for the Launch Image on Xcode 6.0.1 and iOS 8. The LaunchImage seems to be special as the images end up individually in the compiled app bundle and do not remain inside the xcasset bundle folder. – auco Oct 19 '14 at 18:08
  • What happens if there are two different asset catalogs containing identically named sets? How would [UIImage imageNamed:..] know which one to pick? – Carlos P Dec 22 '14 at 17:31
  • For me this doesn't work, XCode 6.0.1 iOS 7 iPod Touch – dev Feb 8 '15 at 3:03

One can easily access Launch image by one line of code.

 UIImage *myAppsLaunchImage = [UIImage launchImage];

Please follow steps given below to achieve functionality depicted above.

Step 1. Extend UIImage class by creating a category & add following method to it.

+ (UIImage *)launchImage {
    NSDictionary *dOfLaunchImage = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                    @"LaunchImage-568h@2x.png",@"568,320,2,8,p", // ios 8 - iphone 5 - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-568h@2x.png",@"568,320,2,8,l", // ios 8 - iphone 5 - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-568h@2x.png",@"568,320,2,7,p", // ios 7 - iphone 5 - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-568h@2x.png",@"568,320,2,7,l", // ios 7 - iphone 5 - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-Landscape@2x~ipad.png",@"1024,768,2,7,l", // ios 7 - ipad retina - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-Landscape~ipad.png",@"1024,768,1,7,l", // ios 7 - ipad regular - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-Portrait@2x~ipad.png",@"1024,768,2,7,p", // ios 7 - ipad retina - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-700-Portrait~ipad.png",@"1024,768,1,7,p", // ios 7 - ipad regular - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-700@2x.png",@"480,320,2,7,p", // ios 7 - iphone 4/4s retina - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-700@2x.png",@"480,320,2,7,l", // ios 7 - iphone 4/4s retina - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-Landscape@2x~ipad.png",@"1024,768,2,8,l", // ios 8 - ipad retina - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-Landscape~ipad.png",@"1024,768,1,8,l", // ios 8 - ipad regular - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-Portrait@2x~ipad.png",@"1024,768,2,8,p", // ios 8 - ipad retina - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-Portrait~ipad.png",@"1024,768,1,8,l", // ios 8 - ipad regular - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage.png",@"480,320,1,7,p", // ios 6 - iphone 3g/3gs - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage.png",@"480,320,1,7,l", // ios 6 - iphone 3g/3gs - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage@2x.png",@"480,320,2,8,p", // ios 6,7,8 - iphone 4/4s - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage@2x.png",@"480,320,2,8,l", // ios 6,7,8 - iphone 4/4s - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-800-667h@2x.png",@"667,375,2,8,p", // ios 8 - iphone 6 - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-800-667h@2x.png",@"667,375,2,8,l", // ios 8 - iphone 6 - landscape
                                    @"LaunchImage-800-Portrait-736h@3x.png",@"736,414,3,8,p", // ios 8 - iphone 6 plus - portrait
                                    @"LaunchImage-800-Landscape-736h@3x.png",@"736,414,3,8,l", // ios 8 - iphone 6 plus - landscape
                                    nil];
    NSInteger width = ([UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.width>[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height)?[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.width:[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height;
    NSInteger height = ([UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.width>[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height)?[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.height:[UIScreen mainScreen].bounds.size.width;
    NSInteger os = [[[[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] componentsSeparatedByString:@"."] objectAtIndex:0] integerValue];
    NSString *strOrientation = UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation])?@"l":@"p";
    NSString *strImageName = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%li,%li,%li,%li,%@",width,height,(NSInteger)[UIScreen mainScreen].scale,os,strOrientation];
    UIImage *imageToReturn = [UIImage imageNamed:[dOfLaunchImage valueForKey:strImageName]];
    if([strOrientation isEqualToString:@"l"] && [strImageName rangeOfString:@"Landscape"].length==0) {
        imageToReturn = [UIImage rotate:imageToReturn orientation:UIImageOrientationRight];
    }
    return imageToReturn;
}

Step 2. Above method should be working by adding following code also into same category of UIImage

static inline double radians (double degrees) {return degrees * M_PI/180;}

+ (UIImage *)rotate:(UIImage*)src orientation:(UIImageOrientation) orientation {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(src.size);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    if (orientation == UIImageOrientationRight) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(90));
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationLeft) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(-90));
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationDown) {
        // NOTHING
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationUp) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(90));
    }
    [src drawAtPoint:CGPointMake(0, 0)];
    UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return image;
}
  • Excellent answer, Thanks! – dortzur Apr 6 '15 at 7:30
  • 1
    Whats the name for the iPhone X launch image now? – RPM Sep 21 '17 at 0:10

I realize that this is not necessarily the best solution for everyone but the easiest (and least error-prone, IMHO) way to do this is by making a separate entry in your Images.xcassets catalog. I called it SplashImage.

When you go to add a new entry, make sure not to select "New Launch Image" as an option. Instead, select the generic "New Image Set". Next, open up the inspector and select the relevant options. If you're building for only retina devices, as I was, you can select the following:

image inspector

This will leave you with four entries (iPhone 4S, iPhone 5(s,c), iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus).

images

The files corresponding the the images are as follows:

| Resolution (Xcode entry) | Launch Image name   |   Device         |
|--------------------------|---------------------|------------------|
| 1x                       | Default-750.png     | iPhone 6         |
| 2x                       | Default@2x.png      | iPhone 4S        |
| Retina 4 2x              | Default-568h@2x.png | iPhone 5, 5s, 5c |
| 3x                       | Default-1242.png    | iPhone 6 Plus    |

Of course, after you've done this you can simply use [UIImage imageNamed:@"SplashImage"]

  • 1
    Interesting idea, but it doesn't work on iPhone 6. It still loads the Default@2x.png image on iPhone 6 simulator. – nonamelive Sep 15 '14 at 20:45
  • Using this approach you should take care about set of launch images for landscape orientation as well. – berec Dec 9 '14 at 10:25

With help of Pichirichi's answer I've implemented the following category (iOS 7+) : UIImage+AssetLaunchImage

It's actually little more than generating name on the fly, but probably will be helpful.

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