30

I recently came across some code using a method call consisting of the format object.(arg1, arg2) without seeing a good explanation of how it works. See this sample code:

class TestServiceObject
  def call
    'method'
  end
end

TestServiceObject.new.()
# => 'method'

What's the term for this kind of shorthand?

  • 1
    This answer looks like what you're looking for. For future reference, SymbolHound is quite handy for looking up language syntax... – Simon M Oct 1 '13 at 5:45
  • Awesome! Thanks for the tip. – fruchtose Oct 1 '13 at 6:11
37

The dot-parentheses notation is a shorthand way for passing arguments to the implicit call method on a Ruby object:

foo = lambda {|bar| puts bar}

foo.call('baz')
#=> baz
foo.('baz')

foo.call('baz') === foo.('baz')
#=> true

Also note that the following notations are also valid (and equivalent) invocations of the call method:

foo['baz']
#=> baz
foo::('baz')
#=> baz

In your example, you're explicitly overriding the call method on the TestServiceObject class such that it returns the string 'method' when called. Accordingly, you can explicitly override the the call method to accept arguments:

class TestServiceObject
  def call(foo=nil)
    foo || 'method'
  end
end

TestServiceObject.new.()
#=> method
TestServicesObject.new.('bar')
#=> bar

UPDATE:

As commenter @LoganSerman duly notes, the shorthand operator appears to work on anything that responds to call, which is validated in part by the following example:

m = 12.method("+")

m.call(3)
#=> 15
m.(3)
#=> 15

UPDATE 2:

As commenter @Stefan also points out from the documentation on Proc#call:

prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It’s a syntax sugar to hide “call”.

  • From Proc#call: "Note that prc.() invokes prc.call() with the parameters given. It’s a syntax sugar to hide “call”." – Stefan Oct 1 '13 at 7:15
  • For the sake of completeness, you can also invoke call with square brackets m[3] and with the scope resolution operator m::(3) – Stefan Oct 1 '13 at 7:32
  • 1
    "The dot-parentheses notation is a shorthand way for passing arguments to the implicit call method on a Ruby object" – This is wrong. There is no such thing as an "implicit call method". Ruby doesn't have implicit methods. You may be thinking of Scala, which is (to my knowledge) the only language which has implicits. – Jörg W Mittag Oct 1 '13 at 9:55
  • 1
    "Also note that the following notations are also valid (and equivalent) invocations of the call method: foo['baz']" – This is wrong: the indexing operator translates into a call to the [] method, not to the call method. foo['baz'] is equivalent to foo.[]('baz'), not foo.call('baz'). – Jörg W Mittag Oct 1 '13 at 9:57
  • 1
    a_proc[arg] is translated to a_proc.[](arg) and not to a_proc.call(arg). The translation for the [] indexing operator doesn't magically change depending on the object, it is always translated into a call to the [] method and never to the call method, regardless of whether the object is an Array, a Hash, a Proc or a FooBarFrobnicatorThingamajingy. – Jörg W Mittag Oct 1 '13 at 10:39
4

obj.(args) is just a feature provided through the parser. Not technically an alias, but it simply has the same effect as invoking obj.call(args) on an object that defines the call method.

3
foo.(bar, baz)

is interpreted as

foo.call(bar, baz)

just like

foo + bar

is interpreted as

foo.+(bar)

or

foo[bar, baz] = quux

is interpreted as

foo.[]=(bar, baz, quux)

The intention is to make calling function-like objects look similar to calling methods:

foo.(bar, baz) # function
foo(bar, baz)  # method

Despite claims in other answers to this question, it has nothing to do with an "implicit call method" (Ruby doesn't even have implicit methods, only Scala does) or the indexing operator.

The indexing operator is translated into a different method call ([]) and not into a call to call:

o = Object.new

def o.call(*args); "`call` called with #{args.join(', ')}" end

o.(42)
# => "`call` called with 42"

o[42]
# NoMethodError: undefined method `[]' for #<Object:0xdeadbeefc0ffee>

def o.[](*args);   "`[]` called with #{args.join(', ')}"   end

o[42]
# => "`[]` called with 42"

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