11

I have the following hash:

hash = {'name' => { 'Mike' => { 'age' => 10, 'gender' => 'm' } } }

I can access the age by:

hash['name']['Mike']['age']

What if I used Hash#fetch method? How can I retrieve a key from a nested hash?

As Sergio mentioned, the way to do it (without creating something for myself) would be by a chain of fetch methods:

hash.fetch('name').fetch('Mike').fetch('age')
  • 1
    fetch('name').fetch('Mike'), no? – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 1 '13 at 12:14
  • @SergioTulentsev I know but I was thinking if there is something a bit more subtle than chained fetch methods – PericlesTheo Oct 1 '13 at 12:15
  • You can always write your own sugar for that :) – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 1 '13 at 12:16
  • I guess you could :) – PericlesTheo Oct 1 '13 at 12:17
  • @SergioTulentsev add the comment as an answer and i will accept it since there is isn't another way of writing that unless you write something yourself. – PericlesTheo Oct 1 '13 at 12:23
2

There is no built-in method that I know of. I have this in my current project

class Hash
  def fetch_path(*parts)
    parts.reduce(self) do |memo, key|
      memo[key.to_s] if memo
    end
  end
end

# usage
hash.fetch_path('name', 'Mike', 'age')

You can easily modify it to use #fetch instead of #[] (if you so wish).

38

From Ruby 2.3.0 onward, you can use Hash#dig:

hash.dig('name', 'Mike', 'age')

It also comes with the added bonus that if some of the values along the way turned up to be nil, you will get nil instead of exception.

You can use the ruby_dig gem until you migrate.

  • 4
    That is really not a bonus. – Duncan Bayne Sep 6 '16 at 1:31
  • 1
    @DuncanBayne in dynamically typed languages where using nil as falsy value is an idiom - it is. Consider the older rails alternative, which is to chain try invocations - it would do the same. – ndnenkov Sep 6 '16 at 6:13
  • I believe the correct alternative is to chain fetch invocations, which will raise an error by default if a key is not found. Then one can carefully, consciously provide default values as needed. I've seen many bugs caused by code - both Ruby and Coffeescript - blithely treating missing values as nil. – Duncan Bayne Sep 6 '16 at 12:17
  • 1
    @DuncanBayne, with that reasoning you would advise people to surround half of their methods with rescue/if blocks for state checking. Probably everyone should skip normal indexing and go with #fetch always... you simply don't know why you got that nil otherwise? The question is - do you intentionally care. Even in java/c# it should be the other way around - if you are aware that things might be missing from one nesting level onwards and you know that is a problem then you should be trying to handle those cases. Or better - make your structure consistent (but that varies). – ndnenkov Sep 6 '16 at 14:40
  • 1
    That's it in a nutshell: "The question is - do you intentionally care." I prefer to use fetch to a) encourage myself to think carefully about whether I care, and especially b) make it apparent to those reading the code whether I care or not. – Duncan Bayne Sep 6 '16 at 21:50
0

If your goal is to raise a KeyError when any of the intermediate keys are missing, then you need to write your own method. If instead you're using fetch to provide default values for missing keys, then you can circumvent the use of fetch by constructing the Hashes with a default values.

hash = Hash.new { |h1, k1| h1[k1] = Hash.new { |h2, k2| h2[k2] = Hash.new { |h3, k3| } } }
hash['name']['Mike']
# {}
hash['name']['Steve']['age'] = 20
hash
# {"name"=>{"Mike"=>{}, "Steve"=>{"age"=>20}}}

This won't work for arbitrarily nested Hashes, you need to choose the maximum depth when you construct them.

  • Hey, thanks for the anonymous downvote over a year after the fact. How about a comment? – Max Mar 3 '15 at 19:10
0

As of Ruby 2.3.0:

You can also use &. called the "safe navigation operator" as: hash&.[]('name')&.[]('Mike')&.[]('age'). This one is perfectly safe.

Using dig is not safe as hash.dig(:name, :Mike, :age) will fail if hash is nil.

However you may combine the two as: hash&.dig(:name, :Mike, :age).

So either of the following is safe to use:

hash&.[]('name')&.[]('Mike')&.[]('age')

hash&.dig(:name, :Mike, :age)

0

A version that uses a method instead of adding to the Hash class for others using Ruby 2.2 or lower.

def dig(dict, *args)
  key = args.shift
  if args.empty?
    return dict[key]
  else
    dig(dict[key], *args)
  end
end

And so you can do:

data = { a: 1, b: {c: 2}}
dig(data, :a) == 1
dig(data, :b, :c) == 2
-3

if you can

use:

hash[["ayy","bee"]]

instead of:

hash["ayy"]["bee"]

it'll save a lot of annoyances

  • I'm just amazed people use the same words as I do when I make test hashes x'D {a: 'ayee', b: 'bee', c: 'sea'} It only makes sense though... The singularity is upon us! 🔥 – CTS_AE Mar 26 at 22:55

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