4

How can I built a group of constant variable in c#?

For example :

IconType {
    public constant string folder = "FOLDER";
    public constant string application = "APPLICATION";
    public constant string system = "SYSTEM";
}

Then I need to use it like this ways IconType.system but I don't want to do declaration like IconType type = new IconType(), I want to direction access to its variable.

It just looks like JOptionPanel in java, when I want to display the icon I just need to call this JOptionPane.WARNING_MESSAGE

12

Just define them in a class, and since const are implicitly static you can use them

class IconType
{
    public const string folder = "FOLDER";
    public const string application = "APPLICATION";
    public const string system = "SYSTEM";
}

Later you can use them like:

Console.WriteLine(IconType.folder);

You may see: Why can't I use static and const together? By Jon Skeet

  • 1
    So many duplicate answers, but only one that provides the delicious 'implicitly static' detail. – Gusdor Oct 1 '13 at 13:50
  • Thanks you @Habib, I think this answer is more suitable for my situation although others answer might work as well. – overshadow Oct 1 '13 at 14:00
  • @overshadow, you are welcome, you may also use pascal casing for your const. See this question for .Net naming conventions for const – Habib Oct 1 '13 at 14:02
  • I had try this before but I put a public key world before the class IconType but it does not work. Do you know why? Why can't I put a public before the class? – overshadow Oct 1 '13 at 14:02
  • I also prefer making the class static; makes the intent more clear – Leyu Oct 1 '13 at 14:12
1

Seems like you would like to use enums?

public enum IconType {
    Folder,
    Application,
    System
}

Wouldn't that not be enough?

0

You could use an Enum instead?

MSDN Enumeration Types

  • Enums cannot be strings. – Gusdor Oct 1 '13 at 13:47
  • @VenkatRenukaPrasad To what end? Why inflate the code required to get the string value? – Gusdor Oct 1 '13 at 13:51
  • 1
    You have a point.. Why couldn't he use a static class instead? – Ren Oct 1 '13 at 13:52
  • 1
    I agree, I upvoted Habib, but without knowing the full use of this application, Enum might work well - let the OP decide on the approach I guess. – christiandev Oct 1 '13 at 13:58
0

You need a class.

   public static class IconType
    {
        public const string folder = "FOLDER";
        public const string application = "APPLICATION";
        public const string system = "SYSTEM";
    }
0

You could build a class with consts, which are implicitly static, and thus accessible without an instance of the type.

class IconType
{
    public const string folder = "FOLDER";
    public const string application = "APPLICATION";
    public const string system = "SYSTEM";
}

You could also use the strong-typed Settings created for you by Visual Studio in most C# projects.

Properties.Settings.Default

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