9

I've encountered two versions of code that both can accomplish the same task with a little difference in the code itself:

with open("file") as f:
   for line in f:
     print line

and

with open("file") as f:
   data = f.readlines() 
   for line in data:
     print line 

My question is, is the file object f a list by default just like data? If not, why does the first chunk of code work? Which version is the better practice?

  • 1
    the more Pythonic approach is to iterate over the file directly - as your first example. – Wayne Werner Oct 1 '13 at 16:57
7

In both cases, you are getting a file line-by-line. The method is different.

With your first version:

with open("file") as f:
   for line in f:
     print line

While you are interating over the file line by line, the file contents are not resident fully in memory (unless it is a 1 line file).

The open built-in function returns a file object -- not a list. That object supports iteration; in this case returning individual strings that are each group of characters in the file terminated by either a carriage return or the end of file.

You can write a loop that is similar to what for line in f: print line is doing under the hood:

with open('file') as f:
    while True:
        try:
            line=f.next()
        except StopIteration:
            break
        else:
            print line 

With the second version:

with open("file") as f:
   data = f.readlines()    # equivelent to data=list(f)
   for line in data:
     print line

You are using a method of a file object (file.readlines()) that reads the entire file contents into memory as a list of the individual lines. The code is then iterating over that list.

You can write a similar version of that as well that highlights the iterators under the hood:

with open('file') as f:
    data=list(f)
    it=iter(data)
    while True:
        try:
            line=it.next()
        except StopIteration:
            break
        else:
            print line  

In both of your examples, you are using a for loop to loop over items in a sequence. The items are the same in each case (individual lines of the file) but the underlying sequence is different. In the first version, the sequence is a file object; in the second version it is a list. Use the first version if you just want to deal with each line. Use the second if you want a list of lines.

Read Ned Batchelder's excellent overview on looping and iteration for more.

11

File object is not a list - it's an object that conforms to iterator interface (docs). I.e. it implements __iter__ method that returns an iterator object. That iterator object implements both __iter__ and next methods allowing iteration over the collection.

It happens that the File object is it's own iterator (docs) meaning file.__iter__() returns self.

Both for line in file and lines = file.readlines() are equivalent in that they yield the same result if used to get/iterator over all lines in the file. But, file.next() buffers the contents from the file (it reads ahead) to speed up the process of reading, effectively moving the file descriptor to position exact to or farther than where the last line ended. This means that if you have used for line in file, read some lines and the stopped the iteration (you haven't reach end of the file) and now called file.readlines(), the first line returned might not be the full line following the last line iterated over the for loop.

When you use for x in my_it, the interpreter calls my_it.__iter__(). Now, the next() method is being called on the object returned by the previous call, and for each call it's return value is being assigned to x. When next() raises StopIteration, the loop ends.

Note: A valid iterator implementation should ensure that once StopIteration is raised, it should remain to be risen for all subsequent calls to next().

  • 5
    "usually returns self" - this is generally a bad way to implement iterators actually. The iterator object needs to hold some state saying what the next element is. If it was the same as the iterable object, that means two iterators on the same underlying sequence would work buggily. It makes sense for a file because you can't randomly access any line in it, and because a file already internally retains state about how far you've read into it, but not for other collections. – millimoose Oct 1 '13 at 16:40
  • If you would like random access to collection's items I'd rather suggest using __getitem__ instead of an iterator. I agree that returning self is not the best way to write iterators - you'd have to ensure the iterator to be valid for subsequent loops, etc. It all depends on your use case - if the underlying collection is a one-time read only then it looks fine. – Maciej Gol Oct 1 '13 at 16:49
  • "the underlying collection is a one-time read only" - that's actually my point. Almost no collections are. You also missed my point with "random access". What I was saying is that if a collection supports random access to its elements, then its iterator should never be self. Precisely for the reasons you've just mentioned. And obviously you might want to iterate even over collections that support random access. I was talking about the nature of the underlying collection, not about how it's being used. – millimoose Oct 1 '13 at 17:07
  • @millimoose, thanks for insight - I have updated the answer! – Maciej Gol Oct 1 '13 at 17:18
  • You might want to add that what file.next() will do is read a new line from the underlying file and return it to make it clearer why it's equivalent to readlines(). – millimoose Oct 1 '13 at 17:31
4

f is a filehandle, not a list. It is iterable.

0

A file is an iterable. Lots of objects, including lists are iterable, which just means that they can be used in a for loop to sequentially yield an object to bind the for iterator variable to.

Both versions of your code accomplish iteration line by line. The second versions reads the whole file into memory and constructs a list; the first may not read the whole file first. The reason why you might prefer the second is that you want to close the file before something else modifies it; the first might be preferred if the file is very large.

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