-2

I'm suppose to simulate a rock paper scissors game and this is what I have so far. It's not letting me input letters into the scoregame function. How can I fix this?

def scoregame(player1, player2):
    if player1 == R and player2 == R:
        scoregame = "It's a tie, nobody wins."
    if player1 == S and player2 == S:
        scoregame == "It's a tie, nobody wins."
    if player1 == P and player2 == P:
        scoregame = "It's a tie, nobody wins."
    if player1 == R and player2 == S:
        scoregame = "Player 1 wins."
    if player1 == S and player2 == P:
        scoregame = "Player 1 wins."
    if player1 == P and player2 == R:
        scoregame = "Player 1 wins."
    if player1 == R and player2 == P:
        scoregame == "Player 2 wins."
    if player1 == S and player2 == R:
        scoregame == "Player 2 wins."
    if player1 == P and player2 == S:
        scoregame = "Player 2 wins."

print(scoregame)
  • 1
    Can you show the code that takes the input and shows scoregame? Because from the description, and the last line, I suspect you've got those wrong too. Also, please describe the problem. What do you mean "it's not letting me input letters". Does it raise an exception as soon as you run the program? When it calls the scoregame function? Inside the scoregame function? If so, give us the exception and traceback. Or does it run successfully, but do the wrong thing? If so, describe your input, expected output, and actual output. – abarnert Oct 1 '13 at 17:52
  • 1
    Also, as a side note, using the same name for your function and a variable isn't actually incorrect in this case, but it's confusing, and it's better to avoid it. – abarnert Oct 1 '13 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Dualinity: One day you're going to write a recursive function that returns a function and have a fun time debugging it. :) – abarnert Oct 1 '13 at 18:28
  • 2
    Please don't deface your questions. I've rolled that edit back. – Brad Larson Oct 2 '13 at 16:59
  • 1
    @BradLarson: The OP suggested a similar defacement on my answer. – Martijn Pieters Oct 2 '13 at 17:05
5

You need to test against strings; you are now testing against variable names:

if player1 == 'R' and player2 == 'R':

but you can simplify the case where both players picked the same option by testing if they are equal:

if player1 == player2:
    scoregame = "It's a tie, nobody wins."

Next, I'd use a mapping, a dictionary, to codify what beats what:

beats = {'R': 'S', 'S': 'P', 'P': 'R'}

if beats[player1] == player2:
    scoregame = "Player 1 wins."
else:
    scoregame = "Player 2 wins."

Now your game can be tested in just 2 tests. All put together:

def scoregame(player1, player2):
    beats = {'R': 'S', 'S': 'P', 'P': 'R'}
    if player1 == player2:
        scoregame = "It's a tie, nobody wins."
    elif beats[player1] == player2:
        scoregame = "Player 1 wins."
    else:
        scoregame = "Player 2 wins."
    print(scoregame)
  • If he uses elif instead of if, he can reduce the whole thing to just 5 clauses. But you're right, the dictionary lets him reduce it to 3, and is harder to get wrong. – abarnert Oct 1 '13 at 17:54
  • 2
    @jerry2144: why the defacement? If you used my post in your homework, then that's your problem, not mine. Please do not vandalize my work because it embarasses you. – Martijn Pieters Oct 2 '13 at 17:05
  • The funny thing is that, if his teacher had googled for the first line of your version of the code, this question would have been the first search result anyway. So, instead of being evidence that the student came up with exactly the same code as you (which proves nothing, since it's the obvious way to write it…), it's now evidence that the student intentionally copied and pasted the code and then tried to cover it up. (This is why I don't understand teachers who hate SO…) – abarnert Oct 2 '13 at 18:14
1

You are using letters without quotes so its looking for a Variable called P but what you want is a String "P" so put the letters in quotes:

if player1 == "P" and player2 == "S":

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.