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I have tab delimited text file, named 'a.txt'. The D column is empty.

 A       B       C    D
10      20     NaN
30              40
40      30      20
20      NA      20

I want to have the dataframe looking and acting exactly as the text file, with a space in the 2nd row and in the 2nd column.

Unfortunately, read.csv is converting all the blanks and NA to "NA". I want to read NA and NaN as characters.

 b<- read.csv("a.txt",sep="\t", skip =0, header = TRUE, comment.char = "",check.names = FALSE, quote="", )

To summarize: I want to replicate the same values in output file without modifying them:

  • If there is a blank in input, the output should be blank.
  • If the input has NA or Nan, then the output should also have NA or NaN.
0

4 Answers 4

37

Late edit: After re-reading this after the edits and extended comments, I'm wondering if what was needed (or asked for, at least) was pretty much the exact opposite of what I advise below. The request for this:

Unfortunately, read.csv is converting all the blanks and NA to "NA". I want to read NA and NaN as characters.

,,, might have been satisfied (somewhat paradoxically) with the arguments: colClasses="character", stringsAsFactors=FALSE, na.strings="."`

Then any character value including an empty string would come in as itself. Arguing against this is the acceptance of the answer that converts empty character values ("") to R _NA_character values.

Here's a test example with various results:

 sapply(read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', na.strings=""), class )
#        A         B         C         D 
# "factor" "logical"  "factor" "numeric" 
 sapply(read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', na.strings="x"), class )
#        A         B         C         D 
# "factor" "logical"  "factor" "numeric" 
 sapply(read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', na.strings="x", stringsAsFactors=FALSE), class )
#          A           B           C           D 
#"character"   "logical" "character"   "numeric" 

#Almost the expressed desired result
 sapply(read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', #colClasses="character", stringsAsFactors=FALSE), class )
#          A           B           C           D 
#"character" "character" "character" "character" 
#But ... still get a real R <NA>
read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', colClasses="character", stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
#  A B    C   D
#1 a   <NA> NaN
#So add all three
 read.csv(text='A\tB\tC\tD\na\t""\tNA\tNaN', sep='\t', colClasses="character", stringsAsFactors=FALSE,na.strings=".")
#  A B  C   D
#1 a   NA NaN
# Finally all columns are character and no "real" R NA's

The default for na.strings is just "NA", so you perhaps need to add "NaN". True blanks ("") are set to missing but spaces (" ") are not:

 b<- read.csv("a.txt",  skip =0,  
               comment.char = "",check.names = FALSE, quote="",
               na.strings=c("NA","NaN", " ") )

It's not clear that this is the problem since your data example is malformed and does not have commas. That may be the fundamental problem since read.csv does not allow tab-separation. Use read.delim or read.table if your data has tab-separation.

b<- read.table("a.txt", sep="\t" skip =0, header = TRUE, 
               comment.char = "",check.names = FALSE, quote="",
               na.strings=c("NA","NaN", " ") )

# worked example for csv text file connection
 bt <- "A,B,C  
10,20,NaN
30,,40
40,30,20
,NA,20"

 b<- read.csv(text=bt, sep=",", 
                comment.char = "",check.names = FALSE, quote="\"",
                na.strings=c("NA","NaN", " ") )
 b
#--------------
   A  B  C
1 10 20 NA
2 30 NA 40
3 40 30 20
4 NA NA 20

Example 2:

bt <- "A,B,C,D
10,20,NaN
30,,40
40,30,20
,NA,20"

 b<- read.csv(text=bt, sep=",", 
                comment.char = "",check.names = FALSE, quote="\"",
                na.strings=c("NA","NaN", " ") , colClasses=c(rep("numeric", 3), "logical")) 
 b
#----------------
   A  B  C  D
1 10 20 NA NA
2 30 NA 40 NA
3 40 30 20 NA
4 NA NA 20 NA
> str(b)
'data.frame':   4 obs. of  4 variables:
 $ A: num  10 30 40 NA
 $ B: num  20 NA 30 NA
 $ C: num  NA 40 20 20
 $ D: logi  NA NA NA NA

It's mildly interesting that NA and NaN are not identical for numeric vectors. NaN is returned by operations that have no mathematical meaning (but as noted in the help page you get with ?NaN, the results of operations may depend on the particular OS. Tests of equality are not appropriate for either NaN or NA. There are specific is functions for them:

> Inf*0
[1] NaN

> is.nan(c(1,2.2,3,NaN, NA) )
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
> is.na(c(1,2.2,3,NaN, NA) )
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  # note the difference
9
  • This will convert the current NA and NaN values to "".. I wont be able to get them back.. I need to keep NA, NaN and blank values. Oct 2, 2013 at 11:43
  • I dig more into my data...The column D is totally empty ,,with class "logical". \ Oct 2, 2013 at 15:08
  • How can something be totally empty with class logical? PLEASE POST YOUR DATA. You have not shown us what the teext file looks like and are perhaps showing us what screen output you are seeing.... not the same thing.
    – IRTFM
    Oct 2, 2013 at 15:08
  • The column D is empty.If you do sapply(b,class).. you get A B C D ""integer" "integer" "numeric" logical" Oct 2, 2013 at 15:13
  • You still are not telling us what your data file looks like. I can make an empty logical column if I use colClasses> See above.
    – IRTFM
    Oct 2, 2013 at 15:20
12

After reading the csv file, try the following. It will replace the NA values with "".

b[is.na(b)]<-""

Fairly certain that won't fix your NaN values. That will need to be resolved in a separate statement

b[is.nan(b)]<-""
3
  • 2
    That will convert all the columns to string variables. The second one, then will not fix NaN's then because all of the columns of b will be strings after using the first one. Oct 1, 2013 at 22:18
  • This will convert the current NA and NaN values to "".. I wont be able to get them back.. I need to keep NA, NaN and blank values. Oct 2, 2013 at 11:43
  • No. It will convert them all to NA.
    – IRTFM
    Oct 2, 2013 at 14:55
2

You can specify colClasses in the read.csv statement to read the column as text.

9
  • 2
    This is not correct. colClasses doesn't help here. Or maybe more precisely, there is a more appropriate argument to use, I think.
    – joran
    Oct 1, 2013 at 21:23
  • Very cryptic... stringsAsFactors=FALSE?
    – beroe
    Oct 1, 2013 at 21:35
  • I don't understand. When the OP says he/she wants to have the dataframe exactly as the text file, do they mean that we should get three columns with a blank, an "NA", and a "NaN" as three of the entries as shown in the question? Oct 1, 2013 at 21:42
  • I agree the OP's question is a bit unclear. My only point was that, as DWin points out, the na.strings argument seems a more likely suspect than colClasses here.
    – joran
    Oct 1, 2013 at 22:15
  • What I meant, if I write "b" to nee text file, it should be exactly as the input t.txt,,with spaces...not newly introduced Na Oct 2, 2013 at 13:35
2

Use the na.string argument.
na.string is used to define what arguments are to be read as na value from the data. So if you mention

read.csv(text=bt, na.string = "abc")

then whenever in your data it the value "abc" occurs, then it will convert it into na.
Since "abc" is not found in your data it won't convert any value into na.

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