244

Is there any particular difference between intval and (int)?

Example:

$product_id = intval($_GET['pid']);
$product_id = (int) $_GET['pid'];

Is there any particular difference between above two lines of code?

206

intval() can be passed a base from which to convert. (int) cannot.

int intval( mixed $var  [, int $base = 10  ] )
12
  • 81
    (int) is faster than intval(), according to wiki.phpbb.com/Best_Practices:PHP Sep 1 '11 at 11:33
  • As I noted below earlier today, the base conversion does not work as expected if the argument is an int or float.
    – t-dub
    Oct 20 '11 at 4:23
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    @moose that page states $i++ is incorrect in red. But it should be slower!! Feb 26 '12 at 1:09
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    I never spoke of $i++. What do you mean? When you say "But it should be slower!!" what do you compare? Feb 26 '12 at 16:51
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    I did benchmarking on ideone - (int) typecast is faster x 2 ! (int):ideone.com/QggNGc , intval():ideone.com/6Y8mPN
    – jave.web
    Aug 12 '14 at 18:32
56

One thing to note about the difference between (int) and intval(): intval() treats variables which are already ints and floats as needing no conversion, regardless of the base argument (as of PHP 5.3.5 at least). This behavior isn't the most obvious, as noted in the comments on the PHP doc page and shamelessly reiterated here:

$test_int    = 12;
$test_string = "12";
$test_float  = 12.8;

echo (int) $test_int;         // 12
echo (int) $test_string;      // 12
echo (int) $test_float;       // 12

echo intval($test_int, 8);    // 12 <-- WOAH!
echo intval($test_string, 8); // 10
echo intval($test_float, 8)   // 12 <-- HUH?
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  • 16
    The doc does say The base parameter has no effect unless the var parameter is a string. Then again the page was apparently updated four days ago, so perhaps that's what was added. Feb 7 '12 at 11:38
  • 3
  • 7
    Prominently documented or not, the behavior is a little surprising given the fact that the function theoretically can do base conversion. It definitely tripped me up before, but perhaps I just need to RTFM a bit more carefully :)
    – t-dub
    Feb 10 '12 at 17:07
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    I realize this is an old thread, and if you are still programming, then I hope you now see why this is actually the most obvious result. An int has no base because base is only used in string representations. Or more simply, an int of 12 in base 10 is the same as an int of 12 in base 99. It is still 12. The expectation that intval(12,8) would give an answer that when converted to a string with no formatting would look like a base 8 number is just wrong. What would you expect from intval(12,16) because it can't make an int a c? Dec 22 '16 at 17:54
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    @Addison int has no base because an int isn't stored in a string form, and base is only relevant when looking at a number in string form. Thinking of it another way, if you use rocks to count, and you take a bunch and put them into a pile, asking the question what base is the pile of rocks makes no sense because the rocks don't have a "base". It's only when you want to write down the number of rocks that base matters. Apr 17 '18 at 19:18
41

Sorry for necroing, I just wanted to see if/how PHP7 has an effect on this question:

$ php -v
PHP 7.0.4-5+deb.sury.org~trusty+1 (cli) ( NTS )

The test:

php > $start_ts = microtime(true); for($i = 0; $i < 100000000; $i++) { $a = (int) '1'; } var_dump((microtime(true) - $start_ts)*1000 . ' ms');
string(18) "3279.1121006012 ms"
php > $start_ts = microtime(true); for($i = 0; $i < 100000000; $i++) { $a = intval('1'); } var_dump((microtime(true) - $start_ts)*1000 . ' ms');
string(18) "5379.3351650238 ms"

As you can see, casting is definitely faster, by almost 100%

But I had to increase the loop count to 100 million before the difference was a matter of seconds, which is about when I would actually start caring about performance, in most cases.

So I'll stick with using the intval function, because casting is a bit of language magic that's happening. Even if intval uses casting behind the scenes, if there were to be a bug found with casting, and for some reason it could not be fixed (backwards compatibility?), then they could at least fix intval to perform it's duty.

Update (PHP 7.1 + Extra case):

$ php -v
PHP 7.1.0RC6 (cli) (built: Nov  9 2016 04:45:59) ( NTS )
$ php -a
php > $start_ts = microtime(true); for($i = 0; $i < 100000000; $i++) { $a = (int) '1'; } var_dump((microtime(true) - $start_ts)*1000 . ' ms');
string(18) "3583.9052200317 ms"
php > $start_ts = microtime(true); for($i = 0; $i < 100000000; $i++) { $a = intval('1'); } var_dump((microtime(true) - $start_ts)*1000 . ' ms');
string(18) "3569.0960884094 ms"
php > $start_ts = microtime(true); for($i = 0; $i < 100000000; $i++) { $a = '1' + 0; } var_dump((microtime(true) - $start_ts)*1000 . ' ms');
string(18) "1641.7920589447 ms"

Looks like 7.1 optimized intval, and '1' + 0 is now the winner of this speed contest :) I'd still keep using intval anyway

9
  • 1
    the only benchmark left is to +0 the var... not sure if the implicit cast here is faster than the explicit one.
    – SparK
    Dec 2 '16 at 17:07
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    LOL @ +0 winning... that's a very dirty hack
    – SparK
    Dec 5 '16 at 22:52
  • @SparK your idea :) I wouldn't trust it though, PHP's type casting rules are not exactly the best
    – Populus
    Dec 5 '16 at 23:58
  • For v5.5.34 my results were 9191.0059452057 ms, 23307.397127151 ms, and 11483.719110489 ms respectively. So before PHP 7, casting is the fastest.
    – Katrina
    Dec 28 '16 at 16:02
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    @chinoto-vokro both +0 and |0 will make a warning while casting non-numeric or empty string, also +0 will make a fatal error while casting an empty array
    – a55
    Dec 5 '20 at 12:00
28

I think there is at least one difference : with intval, you can specify which base should be used as a second parameter (base 10 by default) :

var_dump((int)"0123", intval("0123"), intval("0123", 8));

will get you :

int 123
int 123
int 83
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    I find it incredibly amusing that one can convert the base 17 number "g" into decimal: intval("2g", 17) = 50 = 2*17 + 16
    – JSchaefer
    Oct 6 '11 at 19:10
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    @JSchaefer I took it even further, and found that the maximum I could pass as base is 36, such as in intval("g", 36) //16. Any value larger than 36 returns 0. That suggests that we can use all 0-9 plus a-z characters for our custom base, such as intval("z",36) //35. Also, it should be noted that the first parameter is case-insensitive. Dec 3 '19 at 15:49
19

One useful property of intval is that - since it is a function and not a language construct - it can be passed as an argument to a function that expects a function. You can't do this with (int).

For example, I have used it to sanitize integers for inclusion into a SQL IN() clause by passing it to array_map. Here is an example:

$ids = implode(",", array_map('intval', $_POST['array_of_integers']));
$sql = "SELECT * FROM table WHERE ids IN ($ids)";
2
  • anonymous function as callback: array_map(function($n){return (int)$n;}, $_POST['array_of_integers']) Oct 5 '16 at 1:53
  • @DanielOmine I meant that you can use it without having to define the callback function. Oct 7 '16 at 19:31
16

Amber is right and if I may add a useful information type casting (adding a "(int)" before your expression ) is 300 to 600% faster than intval. So if your purpose is not to dealing with other bases than decimal, I recommend using: (int) $something

1
9

The thing that intval does that a simple cast doesn't is base conversion:

int intval ( mixed $var [, int $base = 10 ] )

If the base is 10 though, intval should be the same as a cast (unless you're going to be nitpicky and mention that one makes a function call while the other doesn't). As noted on the man page:

The common rules of integer casting apply.

0

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