9

Consider the following:

namespace N {
    extern "C" void f();
}

void g() {
    N::f();
}

This code declares an external function with C linkage inside a namespace. This makes possible to refer to such a function from a private namespace, avoiding the resulting namespace pollution caused by an ordinary global external declaration. It also allows client code to issue other (hopefully compatible) declarations for the same function without conflicts, even in the global namespace, possibly originated from a vendor-provided header inclusion.

I often rely on similar constructs in both C and C++ to isolate compilations from bad-written or conflicting header files provided with some libraries. (In C, this is achieved by issuing the needed declarations at function scope, which would be also possible in C++, if not for the extern linkage declaration being not allowed at function scope.) This is specially useful for properly linking against a well-defined ABI without having to rely on vendor-provided header files.

Is it possible to do the same with functions or methods with regular C++ linkage? That is: to declare an external function with C++ linkage inside a private namespace (or at any sort of local scope), but which possibly refers to a function actually defined inside another namespace?

Intended functionality (pseudo-code):

namespace N {
    // Actually should link with P::f() (and not N::f()).
    extern "C++" void f();
}

void g() {
    N::f(); // P::f();
}

This obviously is not a problem for source files (as opposed to header files), because namespace pollution does not matter in that case. Thus, this question refers mostly to isolating declarations in library header files (for use inside templates and inline functions).

Compiler-specific solutions are welcome (MSVC and GCC being of interest).

Example: suppose my library is called Lib1 and I want to declare everything inside the Lib1 namespace.

// Lib1.hpp
namespace Lib1 {
    class Class1;
    void func1();
    // ...
}

Now suppose my library refers to another library, Lib2, which is a C library provided by someone else.

/* Lib2.h */
#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

struct Struct2;
void func2();
/* ... */

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

In my library, I can refer to entities from Lib2 without having to include Lib2.h at all, if for some reason this is needed:

// Lib1.hpp
namespace Lib1 {
    extern "C" void func2();

    inline void inlineX() {
        func2();
    }
}

At the same time, a client code is free to include both Lib1.hpp and Lib2.h (considering it is C++-friendly) without conflicts.

Now, suppose there is a third library, Lib3, which is a C++ library and declares entities in the Lib3 namespace.

// Lib3.hpp
namespace Lib3 {
    class Class3;
    void func3();
    // ...
}

Is there a way to relate to Lib3 in the same manner as Lib2? That is: refer to entities in Lib3 inside Lib1.hpp, without including Lib3.hpp but still allowing client code to include both Lib1.hpp and Lib3.hpp with no hassles?

If, in Lib1, it is declared:

// Lib1.hpp
namespace Lib3 {
    void func3();
}

namespace Lib1 {
    inline void inlineY() {
        Lib3::func3();
    }
}

then it might occur conflicts if client code includes both Lib1.hpp and Lib3.hpp -- certainly not in this simple example in which the declarations are identical, but subtle differences in real situations can trigger warnings or errors at syntax level, even if the underlying ABI is the same, since this violates the premise of not declaring anything outside the Lib1 namespace.

Hope this helps to understand the question.

  • y not put the implementation of f in the source file and not need a namespace in the header? – Kal Oct 2 '13 at 3:18
  • also u can use a layer of indirection in case u can't do what i suggested above because they're templates or somn, ie put void f() { void callMyF(); callMyF(); } in header and in source put extern "C" myF(); void callMyF() { return myF(); } – Kal Oct 2 '13 at 3:20
  • 2
    It doesn't look like your C linkage example is valid: 7.5/6 ...An entity with C language linkage shall not be declared with the same name as an entity in global scope, unless both declarations denote the same entity... – Igor Tandetnik Oct 2 '13 at 4:01
  • Why do you want to write N and have it mean P? Why not simply write P? – Igor Tandetnik Oct 2 '13 at 4:08
  • The first thing that comes to mind is the "principle of least astonishment". "extern "C"" only deals with name mangling and doesn't do anything else. So what you're doing is essentially a "black magic" that shouldn't be used in code somebody else will ever read. Code is written for people to read it. So it would be better to just write functition forwarder manually. – SigTerm Oct 2 '13 at 5:55
1

Isn't this just the intended usage of the using directive in C++?

// Lib3.hpp
#pragma once
namespace Lib3 {
    void func3();
}

// Lib1.hpp
#include <Lib3.hpp>
namespace Lib1 {
    using Lib3::func3;
}
  • Thanks for your answer. Actually, the idea is not having Lib3::func3() declared at all -- not inside Lib3 anyway, but either, somehow, at Lib1, or at some function (or class) local scope. Let me draw your attention to the C linkage case: albeit func2() is declared inside Lib1, it refers to something outside Lib1 -- I wondered if it was possible to do the same with C++-linked entities. However, by looking at the progress of the question, I feel that there is no solution to the problem at the syntax level, but only at the link level, if any (some symbol renaming or the sort). – alecov Oct 4 '13 at 1:18
  • In other words, you want the effect of using, but then also you want to prevent Lib1's users from using Lib3 directly? Sometimes this effect can be achieved with #define Lib3 __Lib3_internal_to_Lib1 ; #include <Lib3.h> ; #undef Lib3. – Quuxplusone Oct 4 '13 at 15:41
  • In fact I want to allow Lib1's users to use Lib3 directly, however Lib1 itself is independent from any header file from Lib3 (and does not declare anything inside the Lib3 namespace whatsoever). This is what happens in the C case: Lib1 accesses the C interface, and allows anyone else to include Lib2.h at will (because anything Lib1 declares, which relates to Lib2, is inside Lib1). So I need to refer to Lib3 entities with local visibility only (either at local scope or inside the Lib1 library namespace). Also, the #define trick would ensue link errors, wouldn't it? – alecov Oct 4 '13 at 17:12
  • I've cleaned up my example to make it clearer what I'm suggesting. What is it about this example that you don't like? – Quuxplusone Oct 4 '13 at 21:21
  • Your answer is well-directed but it doesn't solve the problem I proposed, because I believe you did not fully understand what I'm looking for. To make things easier to understand, I'll propose a challenge: can you call Lib3::func3() without declaring anything inside Lib3 and without including Lib3.hpp? In C, you can: you can declare func1()'s prototype at a function local scope and call it. The question is: can you do the same with C++? – alecov Oct 8 '13 at 16:00

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