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Why does a single-precision floating point number have 7 digit precision (or double 15-16 digits precision)?

Can anyone please explain how we arrive on that based on the 32 bits assigned for float(Sign(32) Exponent(30-23), Fraction (22-0))?

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23 fraction bits (22-0) of the significand appear in the memory format but the total precision is actually 24 bits since we assume there is a leading 1. This is equivalent to log10(2^24) ≈ 7.225 decimal digits.

Double-precision float has 52 bits in fraction, plus the leading 1 is 53. Therefore a double can hold log10(2^53) ≈ 15.955 decimal digits, not quite 16.

Note: The leading 1 is not a sign bit. It is actually (-1)^sign * 1.ffffffff * 2^(eeee-constant) but we need not store the leading 1 in the fraction. The sign bit must still be stored


There are some numbers that cannot be represented as a sum of powers of 2, such as 1/9:

>>>> double d = 0.111111111111111;
>>>> System.out.println(d + "\n" + d*10);
0.111111111111111
1.1111111111111098

If a financial program were to do this calculation over and over without self-correcting, there would eventually be discrepancies.

>>>> double d = 0.111111111111111;
>>>> double sum = 0;
>>>> for(int i=0; i<1000000000; i++) {sum+=d;}
>>>> System.out.println(sum);
111111108.91914201

After 1 billion summations, we are missing over $2.

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    The leading 1 is not a sign bit. It is actually (-1)^sign * 1.ffffffff * 2^(eeee-constant) but we need not store the leading 1 in the fraction. The sign bit must still be stored – Ron Oct 2 '13 at 5:24
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    I have seen in some palces they mention the precision of float (15 - 16 ). Ever 15.955 will be 16? – avulosunda Oct 2 '13 at 5:38
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    @jb_2519 As Ron shows, double-precision floating points have 15.955 decimal digits of precision. That means that you can rely pretty well on the first 15 decimal digits being accurate, with any following digits being only partially representable at best. Personally I wouldn't rely on anything past the 14th (or 6th in single-precision) decimal digit being accurate. – Corey Oct 2 '13 at 5:52
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    @RonE Why we are taking log base 10 to calculate the no. of decimal digits? Can you explain me this concept? – Pankaj Mahato Aug 11 '14 at 17:05
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    @PankajMahato That's just how you calculate it. For example, if we want to represent the number 2^24 in base 10, it is 16777216. Since log10(2^24) = 7.225, we can see that this should be a leading digit followed by 7 more. In reverse, if we want to see what the smallest binary number is that has 8 following digits in decimal, we calculate the following: log2(10^8)= 26.58. Therefore we need a 27 bit binary number to get decimal number that has a leading digit followed by 8 more (9 digits total). Keep in mind that 10^8 is a 1 followed by 8 zeros, for a total of 9 digits. – Ron Aug 14 '14 at 20:43
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32 float has 23 bit,so the smallest unit is

2^(-23) = 0.00000011920928955078125

The other numbers are only greater than 0.00000011920928955078125.It's not impossible less than 0.00000011920928955078125.And other numbers is consist of 0.00000011920928955078125

0.00000011920928955078125 * n

So we can express 0.00000x[1-9] easily.And float32 can has 6 digit precision certainly.Don't think about roundoff, we can calculate 7 digit number as bellow:

0.00000011920928955078125 * 1 = 0.0000001
0.00000011920928955078125 * 2 = 0.0000002
0.00000011920928955078125 * 3 = 0.0000003
0.00000011920928955078125 * 4 = 0.0000004
0.00000011920928955078125 * 5 = 0.0000005
0.00000011920928955078125 * 6 = 0.0000007
0.00000011920928955078125 * 7 = 0.0000008
0.00000011920928955078125 * 8 = 0.0000009
0.00000011920928955078125 * 9 = 0.000001

It can't express 0.0000006.This is the result float32 has 6~7 digit precision which we can find in the internet everywhere.

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