Trying to debug an issue with a server and my only log file is a 20GB log file (with no timestamps even! Why do people use System.out.println() as logging? In production?!)

Using grep, I've found an area of the file that I'd like to take a look at, line 347340107.

Other than doing something like

head -<$LINENUM + 10> filename | tail -20 

... which would require head to read through the first 347 million lines of the log file, is there a quick and easy command that would dump lines 347340100 - 347340200 (for example) to the console?

update I totally forgot that grep can print the context around a match ... this works well. Thanks!

  • I would imagine grep has to search the whole file there must be a cpu less intensive way to do this. – ojblass Apr 8 '09 at 3:20

18 Answers 18

up vote 68 down vote accepted

with GNU-grep you could just say

grep --context=10 ...
  • 7
    Or more specifically 10 lines before: grep -B 10 ... Or 10 lines after: grep -A 10 ... – Boy Baukema May 21 '12 at 11:14
  • 10
    This command not working, below sed -n '<start>,<end>p' is working – Basav Jun 21 '13 at 5:40
  • 5
    This is actually not what you want because it will process the whole file even if the match is in the top bit. At this point a head/tail or tail/head combo is much more effective. – Sklivvz May 22 '15 at 13:24
  • 1
    This doesn't satisfy the asked question at all as this doesn't offer a way to output a specific line, as asked. – Chris Rasys Nov 17 '16 at 16:21

I found two other solutions if you know the line number but nothing else (no grep possible):

Assuming you need lines 20 to 40,

sed -n '20,40p;41q' file_name

or

awk 'FNR>=20 && FNR<=40' file_name
  • 4
    +1: Though you might want to quit after printing. May offer some performance benefits if the file is really huge. – jaypal singh Jun 14 '14 at 16:19
  • awk 'NR>=20 && NR<=40' file_name – Sudipta Basak Aug 13 '14 at 7:27
  • 2
    sed -n '20,40p;41q' file_name for quit then. – Snigdha Batra Nov 4 '15 at 11:14
  • 1
    specifically, those are start and end line numbers. If you are in a bigger file it will be '12345678,12345699p' – Code Abominator Nov 12 '15 at 2:41
  • Additionally to @CodeAbominator's comment 41q instruct sed to quit upon line 41. – Brice Dec 21 '17 at 14:17
# print line number 52
sed -n '52p' # method 1
sed '52!d' # method 2
sed '52q;d' # method 3,  efficient on large files 

method 3 efficient on large files

fastest way to display specific lines

  • I'm trying to figure out how to adapt method 3 to use a range instead of a single line, but I'm afraid my sed-foo isn't up to the task. – Xiong Chiamiov Jul 7 '13 at 17:44
  • 6
    @XiongChiamiov How about sed -n '1,500p;501q' for printing 1-500 ? – Sam Aug 12 '14 at 1:17

No there isn't, files are not line-addressable.

There is no constant-time way to find the start of line n in a text file. You must stream through the file and count newlines.

Use the simplest/fastest tool you have to do the job. To me, using head makes much more sense than grep, since the latter is way more complicated. I'm not saying "grep is slow", it really isn't, but I would be surprised if it's faster than head for this case. That'd be a bug in head, basically.

  • 6
    You're right; there is no short cut. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 19 '08 at 2:50
  • 2
    Unless lines are fixed width in bytes, you don't know where to move the file pointer without counting new line characters from the start of the file. – Joseph Lust May 4 '13 at 18:49
  • This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – exhuma May 22 '15 at 13:24
  • @exhuma You're right. I rewrote. Seven-years-ago me got miffed. :) – unwind May 22 '15 at 13:44

What about:

tail -n +347340107 filename | head -n 100

I didn't test it, but I think that would work.

  • No, usually tail has a limit of 256 last kilobytes or similar, depending on version and OS. – anttir Jun 8 '15 at 12:48

I'd first split the file into few smaller ones like this

$ split --lines=50000 /path/to/large/file /path/to/output/file/prefix

and then grep on the resulting files.

  • agreed, break that log up and create a cron job to do that properly. use logrotate or something similar to keep them from getting so huge. – Tanj Oct 10 '08 at 19:52

I prefer just going into less and

  • typing 50% to goto halfway the file,
  • 43210G to go to line 43210
  • :43210 to do the same

and stuff like that.

Even better: hit v to start editing (in vim, of course!), at that location. Now, note that vim has the same key bindings!

You can use the ex command, a standard Unix editor (part of Vim now), e.g.

  • display a single line (e.g. 2nd one):

    ex +2p -scq file.txt
    

    corresponding sed syntax: sed -n '2p' file.txt

  • range of lines (e.g. 2-5 lines):

    ex +2,5p -scq file.txt
    

    sed syntax: sed -n '2,5p' file.txt

  • from the given line till the end (e.g. 5th to the end of the file):

    ex +5,p -scq file.txt
    

    sed syntax: sed -n '2,$p' file.txt

  • multiple line ranges (e.g. 2-4 and 6-8 lines):

    ex +2,4p +6,8p -scq file.txt
    

    sed syntax: sed -n '2,4p;6,8p' file.txt

Above commands can be tested with the following test file:

seq 1 20 > file.txt

Explanation:

  • + or -c followed by the command - execute the (vi/vim) command after file has been read,
  • -s - silent mode, also uses current terminal as a default output,
  • q followed by -c is the command to quit editor (add ! to do force quit, e.g. -scq!).

sed will need to read the data too to count the lines. The only way a shortcut would be possible would there to be context/order in the file to operate on. For example if there were log lines prepended with a fixed width time/date etc. you could use the look unix utility to binary search through the files for particular dates/times

Use

x=`cat -n <file> | grep <match> | awk '{print $1}'`

Here you will get the line number where the match occurred.

Now you can use the following command to print 100 lines

awk -v var="$x" 'NR>=var && NR<=var+100{print}' <file>

or you can use "sed" as well

sed -n "${x},${x+100}p" <file>
  • If you have more than one match, use : "awk 'NR==1{print $1}" for first match and so on – Ramana Reddy Jul 30 '15 at 12:05

With sed -e '1,N d; M q' you'll print lines N+1 through M. This is probably a bit better then grep -C as it doesn't try to match lines to a pattern.

Building on Sklivvz' answer, here's a nice function one can put in a .bash_aliases file. It is efficient on huge files when printing stuff from the front of the file.

function middle()
{
    startidx=$1
    len=$2
    endidx=$(($startidx+$len))
    filename=$3

    awk "FNR>=${startidx} && FNR<=${endidx} { print NR\" \"\$0 }; FNR>${endidx} { print \"END HERE\"; exit }" $filename
}

Get ack

ack --lines=start-end filename

To display a line from a <textfile> by its <line#>, just do this:

perl -wne 'print if $. == <line#>' <textfile>

If you want a more powerful way to show a range of lines with regular expressions -- I won't say why grep is a bad idea for doing this, it should be fairly obvious -- this simple expression will show you your range in a single pass which is what you want when dealing with ~20GB text files:

perl -wne 'print if m/<regex1>/ .. m/<regex2>/' <filename>

(tip: if your regex has / in it, use something like m!<regex>! instead)

This would print out <filename> starting with the line that matches <regex1> up until (and including) the line that matches <regex2>.

It doesn't take a wizard to see how a few tweaks can make it even more powerful.

Last thing: perl, since it is a mature language, has many hidden enhancements to favor speed and performance. With this in mind, it makes it the obvious choice for such an operation since it was originally developed for handling large log files, text, databases, etc.

  • I think this is a MORE complicated answer... – David Mar 26 '15 at 21:57
  • really, it doesn't seem that way to me, since when is running one perl command more complicated than say, running 2+ programs piped together (further down the page), and, I think you are actually saying because I typed more of an explanation that required you to READ, since there are equally complex (or more) down the page that did not get blown out of the water... sheesh – osirisgothra Apr 7 '15 at 11:39
  • Note that the user asked for a range of lines -- your example can be trivially adapted though. – Sklivvz May 22 '15 at 13:31

You could try this command:

egrep -n "*" <filename> | egrep "<line number>"

Easy with perl! If you want to get line 1, 3 and 5 from a file, say /etc/passwd:

perl -e 'while(<>){if(++$l~~[1,3,5]){print}}' < /etc/passwd
  • 1
    You say it's easy with awk, but you did it in perl instead? – Prisoner 13 Oct 7 '17 at 12:49

I am surprised only one other answer (by Ramana Reddy) suggested to add line numbers to the output. The following searches for the required line number and colours the output.

file=FILE
lineno=LINENO
wb="107"; bf="30;1"; rb="101"; yb="103"
cat -n ${file} | { GREP_COLORS="se=${wb};${bf}:cx=${wb};${bf}:ms=${rb};${bf}:sl=${yb};${bf}" grep --color -C 10 "^[[:space:]]\\+${lineno}[[:space:]]"; }
  • Answers with code only tend to get flagged for deletion. Could you add some commentary around how this solves the problem? – Graham Feb 10 at 0:52

If your line number is 100 to read

head -100 filename | tail -1

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