26

That's a pretty elementary question, but I have never delved into generics before and I found myself in the need to use it. Unfortunately I don't have the time right now to go through any tutorials and the answers I found to related questions so far aren't what one could call basic, so there we go:

Let's say I have the following:

List<MyClass1> list1 = getListType1();
List<MyClass2> list2 = getListType2();

if (someCondition)
    MyMethod(list1);
else
    MyMethod(list2);

And of course

void MyMethod(List<T> list){
    //Do stuff
}

Well, I thought it would be this simple, but apparently it is not. VS warns me that

The type arguments for method MyMethod(System.Collections.Generic.List) cannot be inferred from the usage

and if I compile it anyway, I get a

The type or namespace name 'T' could not be found

error.

In the many answers I found, I read that I have to declare what T is, which makes sense, but I couldn't quite grasp how to do so in such a simplistic scenario. Of course, those answers created even more questions in my mind, but right now I just want an explanation of what I'm doing wrong (besides not studying generics) and how to make it right.

  • 1
    For one, make sure you have using System.Collections.Generic; included. – Jon La Marr Oct 2 '13 at 14:13
  • That's not how generics work. MyMethod(List<T> list) is an invalid method signature (unless your class is a generic class with a Type Parameter T) – Federico Berasategui Oct 2 '13 at 14:13
  • Do MyClass1 and MyClass2 have some common base type or interface? Do they share a lot of common properties or methods? – Joel Coehoorn Oct 2 '13 at 14:22
  • Why/how does this question get 3 upvotes? Is there an upvote robot out there? – Uwe Keim Oct 2 '13 at 14:23
  • 6
    @UweKeim, while there is not a lot of research shown, it does show a short complete code example and the error it causes, which is a lot more information than most questions. – gunr2171 Oct 2 '13 at 14:32
42

You need to declare T against the method, then C# can identify the type the method is receiving. Try this:

void MyMethod<T>(List<T> list){
    //Do stuff
}

Then call it by doing:

if (someCondition)
    MyMethod(list1);
else
    MyMethod(list2);

You can make it even stricter, if all classes you are going to pass to the method share a common base class:

void MyMethod<T>(List<T> list) where T : MyClassBase
  • 3
    C# will infer the type based on arguments, so explicitly specifying <MyClass1> isn't needed in this case - obviously if there are no parameters on the method, you will need to specify the generic arguments - but it's nice when they are inferred! – Charleh Oct 2 '13 at 14:15
  • 1
    All answers work, I chose this one as the accepted for being the most complete (including @Charleh comment and the subsequent update). Thank you all. – makoshichi Oct 2 '13 at 14:41
13

You need to add the generic type parameter for T to your method:

void MyMethod<T>(List<T> list) {

The compiler doesn't know what T represents, otherwise.

7

You need to let c# know what type is sent:

List<MyClass1> list1 = getListType1();
List<MyClass2> list2 = getListType2();

if (someCondition)
    MyMethod<MyClass1>(list1);
else
    MyMethod<MyClass2>(list2);

void MyMethod<T>(List<T> list){
    //Do stuff
}
1

Basically, In C#, List < T > class represents a strongly typed list of objects that can be accessed by index.

And it also supports storing values of a specific type without casting to or from object.

we can use in Interger value & String Value in the List.

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