85

I am trying to understand what is machine epsilon. According to the Wikipedia, it can be calculated as follows:

def machineEpsilon(func=float):
    machine_epsilon = func(1)
    while func(1)+func(machine_epsilon) != func(1):
        machine_epsilon_last = machine_epsilon
        machine_epsilon = func(machine_epsilon) / func(2)
    return machine_epsilon_last

However, it is suitable only for double precision numbers. I am interested in modifying it to support also single precision numbers. I read that numpy can be used, particularly numpy.float32 class. Can anybody help with modifying the function?

  • 7
    That function is general enough to work with all precisions. Just pass a numpy.float32 as an argument to the function! – David Zwicker Oct 2 '13 at 16:08
157

An easier way to get the machine epsilon for a given float type is to use np.finfo():

print(np.finfo(float).eps)
# 2.22044604925e-16

print(np.finfo(np.float32).eps)
# 1.19209e-07
  • 1
    just to be 100% confident, the first one provides python "standard" precision of innate floats while the second one the precision of numpy's floats? – Charlie Parker Nov 1 '17 at 16:47
  • note that numpy's standard accuracy is 64 (in a 64 bit computer): >>> print(np.finfo(np.float).eps) = 2.22044604925e-16 and >>> print(np.finfo(np.float64).eps) = 2.22044604925e-16 – Charlie Parker Nov 1 '17 at 17:24
  • 1
    @CharlieParker I could have used np.float instead, since it's just an alias of Python's builtin float. Python floats are 64-bit (C double) on almost all platforms. float and np.float64 therefore usually have equivalent precision, and for most purposes you can use them interchangeably. However they aren't identical - np.float64 is a numpy-specific type, and an np.float64 scalar has different methods to a native float scalar. As you'd expect, np.float32 is a 32-bit float. – ali_m Nov 1 '17 at 18:46
80

Another easy way to get epsilon is:

In [1]: 7./3 - 4./3 -1
Out[1]: 2.220446049250313e-16
  • 13
    That's interesting - could you elaborate on why that works? – ali_m Jan 6 '15 at 17:08
  • 2
    Yeah, and why does 8./3 - 5./3 - 1 yield -eps, and 4./3 - 1./3 - 1 yields zero, and 10./3 - 7./3 - 1 yields zero? – Steve Tjoa Jul 8 '15 at 18:20
  • 17
    Ah, the answer is here, Problem 3: rstudio-pubs-static.s3.amazonaws.com/… Basically, if you subtract the binary representation of 4/3 from 7/3, you get the definition of machine epsilon. So I suppose this should hold for any platform. – Steve Tjoa Jul 8 '15 at 18:24
  • 10
    This is too esoteric of an answer which requires too much knowledge of Python and numpy internals when there's an existing numpy function to find the epsilon. – Olga Botvinnik Oct 26 '15 at 20:14
  • 20
    This answer does not require any knowledge of Python or numpy internals. – GuillaumeDufay Oct 12 '17 at 22:16
15

It will already work, as David pointed out!

>>> def machineEpsilon(func=float):
...     machine_epsilon = func(1)
...     while func(1)+func(machine_epsilon) != func(1):
...         machine_epsilon_last = machine_epsilon
...         machine_epsilon = func(machine_epsilon) / func(2)
...     return machine_epsilon_last
... 
>>> machineEpsilon(float)
2.220446049250313e-16
>>> import numpy
>>> machineEpsilon(numpy.float64)
2.2204460492503131e-16
>>> machineEpsilon(numpy.float32)
1.1920929e-07

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