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enter image description here

I have x,y dynamic array values...

Using x,y values generate moving sine ,triangular,square,sawtooth waves in HTML5 canvas....

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    What did you try so far and where in your code did you run into problems? (please share). Do you need specific frequency and amplitude or just "waves". – user1693593 Oct 2 '13 at 19:08
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The unaltered sine wave is obvious--Math.sin(x), but here are the others...

Given:

p = period
o = oscillation
x = x coordinate 

Find y (the y coordinate):

// squared sine
function squareY(x) {
    return( (x%p)<o?o:0 );
}

// sawtooth sine
function sawY(x){
    return( x%p );
}

// triangular sine
function triY(x){
    return( Math.abs((x%p)-o) );
}

In sample plots:

var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
var ctx=canvas.getContext("2d");

var p=30;    // period
var o=15;   // oscillation

// plot sawtooth sine wave

ctx.beginPath();
for(var x=0;x<120;x++){
    var y=sawY(x);
    ctx.lineTo(x,y);
}
ctx.stroke();


// plot squared sine wave

ctx.beginPath();
for(var x=0;x<60;x++){
    var y=squareY(x);
    y+=75; // just offsetting so drawings don't overlap
    ctx.lineTo(x,y);
}
ctx.stroke();


// plot triangular sine wave

ctx.beginPath();
for(var x=0;x<60;x++){
    var y=triY(x);
    y+=150; // just offsetting so drawings don't overlap
    ctx.lineTo(x,y);
}
ctx.stroke();

[ Added example animation ]

    var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
    var ctx=canvas.getContext("2d");
    ctx.lineWidth=3;

    var p=30;    // period
    var o=15;   // oscillation

    var fps = 60;
    var n=0;
    animate();
    function animate() {
        setTimeout(function() {
            requestAnimationFrame(animate);

            // Drawing code goes here
            n+=1.5;
            if(n>300){
                n=0;
            }
            ctx.clearRect(0,0,canvas.width,canvas.height);
            ctx.beginPath();
            for(var x=0;x<n;x++){
                var y=sawY(x);
                ctx.lineTo(x,y+50);
            }
            ctx.stroke();        

        }, 1000 / fps);
    }


    // sawtooth sine
    function sawY(x){
        return( x%p );
    }
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    To animate: instead of calculating the plot inside a for-loop, just calculate the plot inside an animation-loop over time. If you're new to animation loops, check out requestAnimationFrame (or the older-but-still-useful setInterval or setTimeout). Cheers! :) – markE Oct 3 '13 at 2:59
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    Added example animation code to my answer...jsfiddle.net/m1erickson/DAShs – markE Oct 3 '13 at 5:44
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    @markE : if i may, you're using both rAF and timeout, so you're shooting twice in the head :-) jsfiddle.net/gamealchemist/DAShs/1 – GameAlchemist Oct 3 '13 at 6:24
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    Many traditional solutions come to mind: 1. Offer a "topped" chart which only shows part of the chart including some max/min Y values. 2. Offer a "scaled" chart where every y-increment = 100. 3. When the chart exceeds the current canvas height, use context.scale to bring the excessive values back in the canvas. 4. Have Y be a "magnitude" scale where every 100px in increased height shows values 10 times larger than the previous 100px section (like an earthquake magnitude chart). – markE Oct 4 '13 at 18:04
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    This is getting a bit off-topic to your original question! OK, so plot those y's using something like this: var x=0; var previousY; function plotY(y){ if(previousY){ context.beginPath(); context.moveTo(x,previousY); x+=10; y/=5000; context.lineTo(x,y); context.stroke(); } previousY=y; } – markE Oct 5 '13 at 4:53

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