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This is a Python and NLTK newbie question.

I want to find frequency of bigrams which occur more than 10 times together and have the highest PMI.

For this, I am working with this code

def get_list_phrases(text):

    tweet_phrases = []

    for tweet in text:
        tweet_words = tweet.split()
        tweet_phrases.extend(tweet_words)


    bigram_measures = nltk.collocations.BigramAssocMeasures()
    finder = BigramCollocationFinder.from_words(tweet_phrases,window_size = 13)
    finder.apply_freq_filter(10)
    finder.nbest(bigram_measures.pmi,20)  

    for k,v in finder.ngram_fd.items():
      print(k,v)

However, this does not restricts the results to top 20. I see results which have frequency < 10. I am new to the world of Python.

Can someone please point out how to modify this to get only the top 20.

Thank You

  • what is your input? what is text? – alvas Oct 3 '13 at 13:26
  • "Top 20" means the first twenty results regardless of value. Did you mean "only results greater than 20"? – Spaceghost Oct 3 '13 at 13:31
  • i think he means top 20 PMI score. is that right? see my explanation below. – alvas Oct 3 '13 at 13:39
  • 1
    @user823743 Hi, would like to see how to solve it. – jainp Nov 23 '14 at 3:30
  • 3
    @jainp Hi, did you read my answer? Does it answer your question? It filters collocations based on their frequency, and then ranks them according to PMI (Pointwise Mutual Information) measure, as you wanted. – user823743 Nov 24 '14 at 18:02
24

The problem is with the way you are trying to use apply_freq_filter. We are discussing about word collocations. As you know, a word collocation is about dependency between words. The BigramCollocationFinder class inherits from a class named AbstractCollocationFinder and the function apply_freq_filter belongs to this class. apply_freq_filter is not supposed to totally delete some word collocations, but to provide a filtered list of collocations if some other functions try to access the list.

Now why is that? Imagine that if filtering collocations was simply deleting them, then there were many probability measures such as likelihood ratio or the PMI itself (that compute probability of a word relative to other words in a corpus) which would not function properly after deleting words from random positions in the given corpus. By deleting some collocations from the given list of words, many potential functionalities and computations would be disabled. Also, computing all of these measures before the deletion, would bring a massive computation overhead which the user might not need after all.

Now, the question is how to correctly use the apply_freq_filter function? There are a few ways. In the following I will show the problem and its solution.

Lets define a sample corpus and split it to a list of words similar to what you have done:

tweet_phrases = "I love iphone . I am so in love with iphone . iphone is great . samsung is great . iphone sucks. I really really love iphone cases. samsung can never beat iphone . samsung is better than apple"
from nltk.collocations import *
import nltk

For the purpose of experimenting I set the window size to 3:

finder = BigramCollocationFinder.from_words(tweet_phrases.split(), window_size = 3)
finder1 = BigramCollocationFinder.from_words(tweet_phrases.split(), window_size = 3)

Notice that for the sake of comparison I only use the filter on finder1:

finder1.apply_freq_filter(2)
bigram_measures = nltk.collocations.BigramAssocMeasures()

Now if I write:

for k,v in finder.ngram_fd.items():
  print(k,v)

The output is:

(('.', 'is'), 3)
(('iphone', '.'), 3)
(('love', 'iphone'), 3)
(('.', 'iphone'), 2)
(('.', 'samsung'), 2)
(('great', '.'), 2)
(('iphone', 'I'), 2)
(('iphone', 'samsung'), 2)
(('is', '.'), 2)
(('is', 'great'), 2)
(('samsung', 'is'), 2)
(('.', 'I'), 1)
(('.', 'am'), 1)
(('.', 'sucks.'), 1)
(('I', 'am'), 1)
(('I', 'iphone'), 1)
(('I', 'love'), 1)
(('I', 'really'), 1)
(('I', 'so'), 1)
(('am', 'in'), 1)
(('am', 'so'), 1)
(('beat', '.'), 1)
(('beat', 'iphone'), 1)
(('better', 'apple'), 1)
(('better', 'than'), 1)
(('can', 'beat'), 1)
(('can', 'never'), 1)
(('cases.', 'can'), 1)
(('cases.', 'samsung'), 1)
(('great', 'iphone'), 1)
(('great', 'samsung'), 1)
(('in', 'love'), 1)
(('in', 'with'), 1)
(('iphone', 'cases.'), 1)
(('iphone', 'great'), 1)
(('iphone', 'is'), 1)
(('iphone', 'sucks.'), 1)
(('is', 'better'), 1)
(('is', 'than'), 1)
(('love', '.'), 1)
(('love', 'cases.'), 1)
(('love', 'with'), 1)
(('never', 'beat'), 1)
(('never', 'iphone'), 1)
(('really', 'iphone'), 1)
(('really', 'love'), 1)
(('samsung', 'better'), 1)
(('samsung', 'can'), 1)
(('samsung', 'great'), 1)
(('samsung', 'never'), 1)
(('so', 'in'), 1)
(('so', 'love'), 1)
(('sucks.', 'I'), 1)
(('sucks.', 'really'), 1)
(('than', 'apple'), 1)
(('with', '.'), 1)
(('with', 'iphone'), 1)

I will get the same result if I write the same for finder1. So, at first glance the filter doesn't work. However, see how it has worked: The trick is to use score_ngrams.

If I use score_ngrams on finder, it would be:

finder.score_ngrams (bigram_measures.pmi)

and the output is:

[(('am', 'in'), 5.285402218862249), (('am', 'so'), 5.285402218862249), (('better', 'apple'), 5.285402218862249), (('better', 'than'), 5.285402218862249), (('can', 'beat'), 5.285402218862249), (('can', 'never'), 5.285402218862249), (('cases.', 'can'), 5.285402218862249), (('in', 'with'), 5.285402218862249), (('never', 'beat'), 5.285402218862249), (('so', 'in'), 5.285402218862249), (('than', 'apple'), 5.285402218862249), (('sucks.', 'really'), 4.285402218862249), (('is', 'great'), 3.7004397181410926), (('I', 'am'), 3.7004397181410926), (('I', 'so'), 3.7004397181410926), (('cases.', 'samsung'), 3.7004397181410926), (('in', 'love'), 3.7004397181410926), (('is', 'better'), 3.7004397181410926), (('is', 'than'), 3.7004397181410926), (('love', 'cases.'), 3.7004397181410926), (('love', 'with'), 3.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'better'), 3.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'can'), 3.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'never'), 3.7004397181410926), (('so', 'love'), 3.7004397181410926), (('sucks.', 'I'), 3.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'is'), 3.115477217419936), (('.', 'am'), 2.9634741239748865), (('.', 'sucks.'), 2.9634741239748865), (('beat', '.'), 2.9634741239748865), (('with', '.'), 2.9634741239748865), (('.', 'is'), 2.963474123974886), (('great', '.'), 2.963474123974886), (('love', 'iphone'), 2.7004397181410926), (('I', 'really'), 2.7004397181410926), (('beat', 'iphone'), 2.7004397181410926), (('great', 'samsung'), 2.7004397181410926), (('iphone', 'cases.'), 2.7004397181410926), (('iphone', 'sucks.'), 2.7004397181410926), (('never', 'iphone'), 2.7004397181410926), (('really', 'love'), 2.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'great'), 2.7004397181410926), (('with', 'iphone'), 2.7004397181410926), (('.', 'samsung'), 2.37851162325373), (('is', '.'), 2.37851162325373), (('iphone', 'I'), 2.1154772174199366), (('iphone', 'samsung'), 2.1154772174199366), (('I', 'love'), 2.115477217419936), (('iphone', '.'), 1.963474123974886), (('great', 'iphone'), 1.7004397181410922), (('iphone', 'great'), 1.7004397181410922), (('really', 'iphone'), 1.7004397181410922), (('.', 'iphone'), 1.37851162325373), (('.', 'I'), 1.37851162325373), (('love', '.'), 1.37851162325373), (('I', 'iphone'), 1.1154772174199366), (('iphone', 'is'), 1.1154772174199366)]

Now notice what happens when I compute the same for finder1 which was filtered to a frequency of 2:

finder1.score_ngrams(bigram_measures.pmi)

and the output:

[(('is', 'great'), 3.7004397181410926), (('samsung', 'is'), 3.115477217419936), (('.', 'is'), 2.963474123974886), (('great', '.'), 2.963474123974886), (('love', 'iphone'), 2.7004397181410926), (('.', 'samsung'), 2.37851162325373), (('is', '.'), 2.37851162325373), (('iphone', 'I'), 2.1154772174199366), (('iphone', 'samsung'), 2.1154772174199366), (('iphone', '.'), 1.963474123974886), (('.', 'iphone'), 1.37851162325373)]

Notice that all the collocations that had a frequency of less than 2 don't exist in this list; and it's exactly the result you were looking for. So the filter has worked. Also, the documentation gives a minimal hint about this issue.

I hope this has answered your question. Otherwise, please let me know.

Disclaimer: If you are primarily dealing with tweets, a window size of 13 is way too big. If you noticed, in my sample corpus the size of my sample tweets were too small that applying a window size of 13 can cause finding collocations that are irrelevant.

  • I don't understand: "I will get the same result if I write the same for finder1." I don't get the same result for finder1 vs finder; finder1.ngram_fd.items() will only have items which are occur >= 2 times. "Imagine that if filtering collocations was simply deleting them". But it seems the apply_freq_filter did delete items from the ngram_fd (the frequency diagram) according to this line from old code (~May 2013), or at least filtering it (new code)? – The Red Pea Dec 26 '17 at 0:17
-2

Do go through the tutorial at http://nltk.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/doc/howto/collocations.html for more usage of collocation functions in NLTK and also the math in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pointwise_mutual_information. Hope the following script helps you since your code question didnt specify what's the input.

# This is just a fancy way to create document. 
# I assume you have your texts in a continuous string format
# where each sentence ends with a fullstop.
>>> from itertools import chain
>>> docs = ["this is a sentence", "this is a foo bar", "you are a foo bar", "yes , i am"]
>>> texts = list(chain(*[(j+" .").split() for j in [i for i in docs]]))

# This is the NLTK part
>>> from nltk.collocations import BigramAssocMeasures, BigramCollocationFinder>>> bigram_measures= BigramAssocMeasures()
>>> finder  BigramCollocationFinder.from_words(texts)
# This gets the top 20 bigrams according to PMI
>>> finder.nbest(bigram_measures.pmi,20)
[(',', 'i'), ('i', 'am'), ('yes', ','), ('you', 'are'), ('foo', 'bar'), ('this', 'is'), ('a', 'foo'), ('is', 'a'), ('a', 'sentence'), ('are', 'a'), ('bar', '.'), ('.', 'yes'), ('.', 'you'), ('am', '.'), ('sentence', '.'), ('.', 'this')]

PMI measures the association of two words by calculating the log ( p(x|y) / p(x) ), so it's not only about the frequency of a word occurrence or a set of words concurring together. To achieve high PMI, you need both:

  1. High p(x|y)
  2. low p(x)

Here's some extreme PMI examples.

let's say you have 100 words in the corpus, and if frequency is of a certain word X is 1 and it only occurs with another word Y only once, then:

p(x|y) = 1
p(x) = 1/100
PMI = log(1 / 1/100) = log 0.01 = -2

let's say you have 100 words in the corpus and if frequency of a certain word is 90 but it never occurs with another word Y, then the PMI is

p(x|y) = 0
p(x) = 90/100
PMI = log(0 / 90/100) = log 0 = -infinity

so in that sense the first scenario is >>> PMI between X,Y than the second scenario even though the frequency of the second word is very high.

  • My text is lines separated by a period. What I am looking to do is, find bigrams which occur 10 or more times together. Then use this result to filter them on basis of PMI. I can do them individually, but my problem is tying them together. – jainp Oct 3 '13 at 20:24

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