423

I want to INSERT a record in a database (which is Microsoft SQL Server in my case) using JDBC in Java. At the same time, I want to obtain the insert ID. How can I achieve this using JDBC API?

2
  • Leave the id which is AutoGenrerated in the Query String sql = "INSERT INTO 'yash'.'mytable' ('name') VALUES (?)"; int primkey = 0 ; PreparedStatement pstmt = con.prepareStatement(sql, new String[] { "id" }/*Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS*/); pstmt.setString(1, name); if (pstmt.executeUpdate() > 0) { java.sql.ResultSet generatedKeys = pstmt.getGeneratedKeys(); if (generatedKeys.next()) primkey = generatedKeys.getInt(1); }
    – Yash
    Nov 23, 2015 at 11:40
  • Just a note for everyone. You can only get Generated Keys with AUTO INC type. UUID or char or other types which use defaults will not work with MSSQL.
    – sproketboy
    Feb 3, 2021 at 14:04

14 Answers 14

730

If it is an auto generated key, then you can use Statement#getGeneratedKeys() for this. You need to call it on the same Statement as the one being used for the INSERT. You first need to create the statement using Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS to notify the JDBC driver to return the keys.

Here's a basic example:

public void create(User user) throws SQLException {
    try (
        Connection connection = dataSource.getConnection();
        PreparedStatement statement = connection.prepareStatement(SQL_INSERT,
                                      Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS);
    ) {
        statement.setString(1, user.getName());
        statement.setString(2, user.getPassword());
        statement.setString(3, user.getEmail());
        // ...

        int affectedRows = statement.executeUpdate();

        if (affectedRows == 0) {
            throw new SQLException("Creating user failed, no rows affected.");
        }

        try (ResultSet generatedKeys = statement.getGeneratedKeys()) {
            if (generatedKeys.next()) {
                user.setId(generatedKeys.getLong(1));
            }
            else {
                throw new SQLException("Creating user failed, no ID obtained.");
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that you're dependent on the JDBC driver as to whether it works. Currently, most of the last versions will work, but if I am correct, Oracle JDBC driver is still somewhat troublesome with this. MySQL and DB2 already supported it for ages. PostgreSQL started to support it not long ago. I can't comment about MSSQL as I've never used it.

For Oracle, you can invoke a CallableStatement with a RETURNING clause or a SELECT CURRVAL(sequencename) (or whatever DB-specific syntax to do so) directly after the INSERT in the same transaction to obtain the last generated key. See also this answer.

22
  • 5
    It's better to get the next value in a sequence before the insert than to get the currval after the insert, because the latter might return the wrong value in a multi-threaded environment (e.g., any web app container). The JTDS MSSQL driver supports getGeneratedKeys.
    – JeeBee
    Dec 16, 2009 at 15:44
  • 5
    (should clarify that I usually use Oracle, so have very low expectations of a JDBC driver's capabilities normally).
    – JeeBee
    Dec 16, 2009 at 15:45
  • 7
    An interesting side-effect of NOT setting the Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS option is the error message, which is the completely obscure "The statement must be executed before any results can be obtained." Mar 3, 2011 at 16:15
  • 7
    The generatedKeys.next() returns true if the DB returned a generated key. Look, it's a ResultSet. The close() is just to free resources. Otherwise your DB will run out of them on long run and your application will break. You just have to write up some utility method yourself which does the closing task. See also this and this answer.
    – BalusC
    Mar 9, 2011 at 18:55
  • 5
    Correct answer for most databases/drivers. For Oracle this does not work however. For Oracle, change to: connection.prepareStatement(sql,new String[] {"PK column name"}); Oct 13, 2014 at 13:37
27
  1. Create Generated Column

    String generatedColumns[] = { "ID" };
    
  2. Pass this geneated Column to your statement

    PreparedStatement stmtInsert = conn.prepareStatement(insertSQL, generatedColumns);
    
  3. Use ResultSet object to fetch the GeneratedKeys on Statement

    ResultSet rs = stmtInsert.getGeneratedKeys();
    
    if (rs.next()) {
        long id = rs.getLong(1);
        System.out.println("Inserted ID -" + id); // display inserted record
    }
    
9

I'm hitting Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 from a single-threaded JDBC-based application and pulling back the last ID without using the RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS property or any PreparedStatement. Looks something like this:

private int insertQueryReturnInt(String SQLQy) {
    ResultSet generatedKeys = null;
    int generatedKey = -1;

    try {
        Statement statement = conn.createStatement();
        statement.execute(SQLQy);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        errorDescription = "Failed to insert SQL query: " + SQLQy + "( " + e.toString() + ")";
        return -1;
    }

    try {
        generatedKey = Integer.parseInt(readOneValue("SELECT @@IDENTITY"));
    } catch (Exception e) {
        errorDescription = "Failed to get ID of just-inserted SQL query: " + SQLQy + "( " + e.toString() + ")";
        return -1;
    }

    return generatedKey;
} 

This blog post nicely isolates three main SQL Server "last ID" options: http://msjawahar.wordpress.com/2008/01/25/how-to-find-the-last-identity-value-inserted-in-the-sql-server/ - haven't needed the other two yet.

3
  • 5
    That the application has only one thread doesn't make a race condition impossible: if two clients insert a row and retrieve the ID with your method, it may fail.
    – 11684
    Mar 11, 2013 at 8:54
  • Why would you? I'm just glad I'm not the poor sod who has to debug your code when allowing multiple threads!
    – mjaggard
    Sep 3, 2013 at 13:32
  • @11684 yes you are right. Some drivers just don't give the ID via statement.getGeneratedKeys(), which makes this attempt "understandable". However supplying the ID(s) during the prepareStatement solves this (e.g. preapareStatement(query, new String[] {insertIdColumnName})). See @Yash's slightly underrated answer for more details.
    – Levite
    Mar 3 at 12:53
8

When encountering an 'Unsupported feature' error while using Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS, try this:

String[] returnId = { "BATCHID" };
String sql = "INSERT INTO BATCH (BATCHNAME) VALUES ('aaaaaaa')";
PreparedStatement statement = connection.prepareStatement(sql, returnId);
int affectedRows = statement.executeUpdate();

if (affectedRows == 0) {
    throw new SQLException("Creating user failed, no rows affected.");
}

try (ResultSet rs = statement.getGeneratedKeys()) {
    if (rs.next()) {
        System.out.println(rs.getInt(1));
    }
    rs.close();
}

Where BATCHID is the auto generated id.

1
6

Instead of a comment, I just want to answer post.


Interface java.sql.PreparedStatement

  1. columnIndexes « You can use prepareStatement function that accepts columnIndexes and SQL statement. Where columnIndexes allowed constant flags are Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS1 or Statement.NO_GENERATED_KEYS[2], SQL statement that may contain one or more '?' IN parameter placeholders.

    SYNTAX «

    Connection.prepareStatement(String sql, int autoGeneratedKeys)
    Connection.prepareStatement(String sql, int[] columnIndexes)
    

    Example:

    PreparedStatement pstmt = 
        conn.prepareStatement( insertSQL, Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS );
    

  1. columnNames « List out the columnNames like 'id', 'uniqueID', .... in the target table that contain the auto-generated keys that should be returned. The driver will ignore them if the SQL statement is not an INSERT statement.

    SYNTAX «

    Connection.prepareStatement(String sql, String[] columnNames)
    

    Example:

    String columnNames[] = new String[] { "id" };
    PreparedStatement pstmt = conn.prepareStatement( insertSQL, columnNames );
    

Full Example:

public static void insertAutoIncrement_SQL(String UserName, String Language, String Message) {
    String DB_URL = "jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/test", DB_User = "root", DB_Password = "";

    String insertSQL = "INSERT INTO `unicodeinfo`( `UserName`, `Language`, `Message`) VALUES (?,?,?)";
            //"INSERT INTO `unicodeinfo`(`id`, `UserName`, `Language`, `Message`) VALUES (?,?,?,?)";
    int primkey = 0 ;
    try {
        Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver").newInstance();
        Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection(DB_URL, DB_User, DB_Password);

        String columnNames[] = new String[] { "id" };

        PreparedStatement pstmt = conn.prepareStatement( insertSQL, columnNames );
        pstmt.setString(1, UserName );
        pstmt.setString(2, Language );
        pstmt.setString(3, Message );

        if (pstmt.executeUpdate() > 0) {
            // Retrieves any auto-generated keys created as a result of executing this Statement object
            java.sql.ResultSet generatedKeys = pstmt.getGeneratedKeys();
            if ( generatedKeys.next() ) {
                primkey = generatedKeys.getInt(1);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Record updated with id = "+primkey);
    } catch (InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | ClassNotFoundException | SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Is it safe to use this solution in a multithreaded runtime environment? Jun 14, 2020 at 16:55
  • This deserves way more upvotes!! It solves returning of IDs even for older drivers - no need to use @@IDENTIY (when supplying a String Array of requested IDs).
    – Levite
    Mar 3 at 12:44
3

I'm using SQLServer 2008, but I have a development limitation: I cannot use a new driver for it, I have to use "com.microsoft.jdbc.sqlserver.SQLServerDriver" (I cannot use "com.microsoft.sqlserver.jdbc.SQLServerDriver").

That's why the solution conn.prepareStatement(sql, Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS) threw a java.lang.AbstractMethodError for me. In this situation, a possible solution I found is the old one suggested by Microsoft: How To Retrieve @@IDENTITY Value Using JDBC

import java.sql.*; 
import java.io.*; 

public class IdentitySample
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        try
        {
            String URL = "jdbc:microsoft:sqlserver://yourServer:1433;databasename=pubs";
            String userName = "yourUser";
            String password = "yourPassword";

            System.out.println( "Trying to connect to: " + URL); 

            //Register JDBC Driver
            Class.forName("com.microsoft.jdbc.sqlserver.SQLServerDriver").newInstance();

            //Connect to SQL Server
            Connection con = null;
            con = DriverManager.getConnection(URL,userName,password);
            System.out.println("Successfully connected to server"); 

            //Create statement and Execute using either a stored procecure or batch statement
            CallableStatement callstmt = null;

            callstmt = con.prepareCall("INSERT INTO myIdentTable (col2) VALUES (?);SELECT @@IDENTITY");
            callstmt.setString(1, "testInputBatch");
            System.out.println("Batch statement successfully executed"); 
            callstmt.execute();

            int iUpdCount = callstmt.getUpdateCount();
            boolean bMoreResults = true;
            ResultSet rs = null;
            int myIdentVal = -1; //to store the @@IDENTITY

            //While there are still more results or update counts
            //available, continue processing resultsets
            while (bMoreResults || iUpdCount!=-1)
            {           
                //NOTE: in order for output parameters to be available,
                //all resultsets must be processed

                rs = callstmt.getResultSet();                   

                //if rs is not null, we know we can get the results from the SELECT @@IDENTITY
                if (rs != null)
                {
                    rs.next();
                    myIdentVal = rs.getInt(1);
                }                   

                //Do something with the results here (not shown)

                //get the next resultset, if there is one
                //this call also implicitly closes the previously obtained ResultSet
                bMoreResults = callstmt.getMoreResults();
                iUpdCount = callstmt.getUpdateCount();
            }

            System.out.println( "@@IDENTITY is: " + myIdentVal);        

            //Close statement and connection 
            callstmt.close();
            con.close();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }

        try
        {
            System.out.println("Press any key to quit...");
            System.in.read();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
    }
}

This solution worked for me!

I hope this helps!

1
  • Try supplying String[] array of id names you want, instead of RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS. This should suddenly give you a valid ResultSet and the ID via getInt(1) therein.
    – Levite
    Mar 3 at 12:48
2

You can use following java code to get new inserted id.

ps = con.prepareStatement(query, Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS);
ps.setInt(1, quizid);
ps.setInt(2, userid);
ps.executeUpdate();

ResultSet rs = ps.getGeneratedKeys();
if (rs.next()) {
    lastInsertId = rs.getInt(1);
}
1

It is possible to use it with normal Statement's as well (not just PreparedStatement)

Statement statement = conn.createStatement();
int updateCount = statement.executeUpdate("insert into x...)", Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS);
try (ResultSet generatedKeys = statement.getGeneratedKeys()) {
  if (generatedKeys.next()) {
    return generatedKeys.getLong(1);
  }
  else {
    throw new SQLException("Creating failed, no ID obtained.");
  }
}
1
0

With Hibernate's NativeQuery, you need to return a ResultList instead of a SingleResult, because Hibernate modifies a native query

INSERT INTO bla (a,b) VALUES (2,3) RETURNING id

like

INSERT INTO bla (a,b) VALUES (2,3) RETURNING id LIMIT 1

if you try to get a single result, which causes most databases (at least PostgreSQL) to throw a syntax error. Afterwards, you may fetch the resulting id from the list (which usually contains exactly one item).

0

In my case ->

ConnectionClass objConnectionClass=new ConnectionClass();
con=objConnectionClass.getDataBaseConnection();
pstmtGetAdd=con.prepareStatement(SQL_INSERT_ADDRESS_QUERY,Statement.RETURN_GENERATED_KEYS);
pstmtGetAdd.setString(1, objRegisterVO.getAddress());
pstmtGetAdd.setInt(2, Integer.parseInt(objRegisterVO.getCityId()));
int addId=pstmtGetAdd.executeUpdate();              
if(addId>0)
{
    ResultSet rsVal=pstmtGetAdd.getGeneratedKeys();
    rsVal.next();
    addId=rsVal.getInt(1);
}
1
  • Still I think it's lengthy approach to get it. I think there will be more compressed solution also.
    – TheSagya
    Dec 31, 2018 at 10:12
0

If you are using Spring JDBC, you can use Spring's GeneratedKeyHolder class to get the inserted ID.

See this answer... How to get inserted id using Spring Jdbctemplate.update(String sql, obj...args)

0

If you are using JDBC (tested with MySQL) and you just want the last inserted ID, there is an easy way to get it. The method I'm using is the following:

public static Integer insert(ConnectionImpl connection, String insertQuery){

    Integer lastInsertId = -1;
    try{
        final PreparedStatement ps = connection.prepareStatement(insertQuery);
        ps.executeUpdate(insertQuery);
        final com.mysql.jdbc.PreparedStatement psFinal = (com.mysql.jdbc.PreparedStatement) ps;
        lastInsertId = (int) psFinal.getLastInsertID();
        connection.close();
    } catch(SQLException ex){
        System.err.println("Error: "+ex);
    }

    return lastInsertId;
}

Also, (and just in case) the method to get the ConnectionImpl is the following:

public static ConnectionImpl getConnectionImpl(){
    ConnectionImpl conexion = null;

    final String dbName = "database_name";
    final String dbPort = "3306";
    final String dbIPAddress = "127.0.0.1";
    final String connectionPath = "jdbc:mysql://"+dbIPAddress+":"+dbPort+"/"+dbName+"?autoReconnect=true&useSSL=false";
    
    final String dbUser = "database_user";
    final String dbPassword = "database_password";
    try{
        conexion = (ConnectionImpl) DriverManager.getConnection(connectionPath, dbUser, dbPassword);
    }catch(SQLException e){
        System.err.println(e);
    }
    
    return conexion;
}

Remember to add the connector/J to the project referenced libraries.

In my case, the connector/J version is the 5.1.42. Maybe you will have to apply some changes to the connectionPath if you want to use a more modern version of the connector/J such as with the version 8.0.28.

In the file, remember to import the following resources:

import java.sql.DriverManager;
import java.sql.PreparedStatement;
import java.sql.SQLException;
import com.mysql.jdbc.ConnectionImpl;

Hope this will be helpful.

0

Most others have suggested to use JDBC API for this, but personally, I find it quite painful to do with most drivers. When in fact, you can just use a native T-SQL feature, the OUTPUT clause:

try (
    Statement s = c.createStatement();
    ResultSet rs = s.executeQuery(
        """
        INSERT INTO t (a, b)
        OUTPUT id
        VALUES (1, 2)
        """
    );
) {
    while (rs.next())
        System.out.println("ID = " + rs.getLong(1));
}

This is the simplest solution for SQL Server as well as a few other SQL dialects (e.g. Firebird, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, where you'd use RETURNING instead of OUTPUT).

I've blogged about this topic more in detail here.

-5
Connection cn = DriverManager.getConnection("Host","user","pass");
Statement st = cn.createStatement("Ur Requet Sql");
int ret  = st.execute();
2
  • Excuse me, but what this is supposed to be ? Apr 3, 2018 at 20:26
  • 1. The createStatement method from Connection do not expect any params. 2. The execute method from Statement expects a String with a Query. 3. The execute method returns: true if the first result is a ResultSet object; false if it is an update count or there are no results. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/sql/… May 17, 2018 at 12:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.