13

This is always very confusing to me. Can someone please explain it? The confusion I have is - boolean default to false. So in the below example, does it enter the if loop when state is not turned on, i.e., it is TURNED OFF if (condition is false) OR does it enter the if loop when state is TURNED ON, in other words if (condition is true)?

boolean turnedOn;
if (turnedOn) {
    //do stuff when the condition is false or true?
} else {
    //do else of if
}

I know this is a very basic question, but if you could explain the answer in very basic language, that would be great. :) Feel free to point me to duplicate posts that have a very good explanation (I did not find one where I could clearly get it). Also feel free to change the subject of the post if you'd like to make it more generic.

1
  • 5
    Does this compile: boolean state = "TURNED ON"; ?? Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 6:54

12 Answers 12

33

Okay, so..

// As you already stated, you know that a boolean defaults to false.
boolean turnedOn;
if(turnedOn) // Here, you are saying "if turnedOn (is true, that's implicit)
{
//then do this
}
else // if it is NOT true (it is false)
{
//do this
}

Does it make more sense now?

The if statement will evaluate whatever code you put in it that returns a boolean value, and if the evaluation returns true, you enter the first block. Else (if the value is not true, it will be false, because a boolean can either be true or false) it will enter the - yep, you guessed it - the else {} block.

A more verbose example.

If I am asked "are you hungry?", the simple answer is yes (true). or no (false).

boolean isHungry = true; // I am always hungry dammit.
if(isHungry) { // Yes, I am hungry.
   // Well, you should go grab a bite to eat then!
} else { // No, not really.
   // Ah, good for you. More food for me!

   // As if this would ever happen - bad example, sorry. ;)
}
4
  • What if turnedOn is actually false. Lets say in my above code, I had something like - boolean turnedOn=false, and then rest of the code was the same, then? Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:01
  • Can someone please answer this? Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:05
  • 1
    Then it would enter the else block, as stated. In an if statement, you implicitly ask if turnedOn is true - you could also do if(turnedOn == false), then you would enter the first block (because when turnedOn is false, then turnedOn == false is true).
    – Jeff
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:05
  • 1
    @rickygrimes Great, glad I could help. Going for a snack, brb.
    – Jeff
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:20
14

In your example, the IF statement will run when it is state = true meaning the else part will run when state = false.

if(turnedOn == true) is the same as if(turnedOn)

if(turnedOn == false) is the same as if(!turnedOn)

If you have:

boolean turnedOn = false;

Or

boolean turnedOn;

Then

if(turnedOn)
{

}
else
{
    // This would run!
}
4

ABoolean (with a uppercase 'B') is a Boolean object, which if not assigned a value, will default to null. boolean (with a lowercase 'b') is a boolean primitive, which if not assigned a value, will default to false.

Boolean objectBoolean;
boolean primitiveBoolean;

System.out.println(objectBoolean); // will print 'null'
System.out.println(primitiveBoolean); // will print 'false'

Citation

so in your code because boolean with small 'b' is declared it will set to false hence

boolean turnedOn;
    if(turnedOn) **meaning true**
    {
    //do stuff when the condition is false or true?
    }
    else
    {
    //do else of if ** itwill do this part bechae it is false
    }

the if(turnedon) tests a value if true, you didnt assign a value for turned on making it false, making it do the else statement :)

2
  • @Jeff yes it is but no one noticed it. Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:30
  • Which is too bad, really.
    – Jeff
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 8:38
1
boolean turnedOn;
    if(turnedOn)
    {
    //do stuff when the condition is true - i.e, turnedOn is true
    }
    else
    {
    //do stuff when the condition is false - i.e, turnedOn is false
    }
1
boolean state = "TURNED ON";

is not a Java valid code. boolean can receive only boolean values (true or false) and "TURNED ON"is a String.

EDIT:

now you are talking about a loop and your code does not contain any. your var state is false because the boolean default value and you execute the else clause.

1
  • Sorry about that. In my application, the parameter TURNED ON is set to false through property files. I copied pasted it from the code. I just edited it. Thanks for letting me know so it doesn't confuse other readers of the post. Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 6:57
1

Suppose you want to check a boolean. If true, do something. Else, do something else. You can write:

if(condition==true){

}
else{   //else means this checks for the opposite of what you checked at if

}

instead of that, you can do it simply like:

if(condition){  //this will check if condition is true 

}
else{ 

}

Inversely. If you were to do something if condition was false and do something else if condition was true. Then you would write:

if(condition!=true){   //if(condition=false)

}
else{

}

But following the simple path. We do:

if(!condition){  //it reads out as: if condition is not true. Which means if condition is false right?

}
else{

}

Think about it. You'll get it in no time.

0

Booleans default value is false only for classes' fields. If within a method, you have to initialize your variable by true or false. Thus for example in your case, you'll have a compilation error.

Moreover, I don't really get the point, but the only way to enter within a if is to evaluate the condition to true.

1
  • boolean field with a lowercase b will have a default value of false. A Boolean field with a upercase B will have a default value of null.
    – fluminis
    Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 7:00
0

Assuming state is having a valid boolean value set in your actual code, then the following condition will succeed

if(state)

when state is boolean value is TRUE

If condition checks for the expression whether it is evaluated to TRUE/FALSE. If the expression is simple true then the condition will succeed.

2
  • What do you mean by valid boolean? Does it enter if loop if state is true, or when it is false? Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 6:59
  • @rickygrimes i already have a comment on the question for the same. The valid value for a boolean is true or false. And you have mentioned in your sample "TURNED ON" Commented Oct 3, 2013 at 6:59
0

This is how the if behaves.

if(turnedOn) // This turnedOn should be a boolean or you could have a condition here which would give a boolean result.
{
// It will come here if turnedOn is true (i.e) the condition in the "if" evaluates to true
}
else
{
// It will come here if turnedOn is false (i.e) the condition in the "if" evaluates to false
}
0

The syntax of if block is as below,

if(condition){
// Executes when condition evaluates to true.
}
else{
// Executes when condition evaluates to false.
}

In your case you are directly passing a boolean value so no evaluation is required.

0
if (turnedOn) {
    //do stuff when the condition is false or true?
}
else {
    //do else of if
}

It can be written like:

if (turnedOn == true) {
        //do stuff when the condition is false or true?
    }
else { // turnedOn == false or !turnedOn
        //do else of if
}

So if your turnedOn variable is true, if will be called, if is assigned to false, else will be called. boolean values are implicitly assigned to false if you won't assign them explicitly e.q. turnedOn = true

0

Every time the condition "if (turnedOn)", always refers as "TRUE condition", unless the condition is "if (!turnedOn)" will refer as "FALSE condition".

In other case, if you want to compare two Boolean condition, for example;

Two boolean variable: turnedOn, switchedOn

Let's say current condition;

turnedOn=true switchedOn=false

  • "if (turnedOn) || if (switchedOn)" will return TRUE
  • "if (turnedOn) && if (switchedOn)" will return FALSE

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.