I am creating a header that once scrolled to a certain amount of pixels it fixes and stays in place.

Can I do this using just css and html or do i need jquery too?

I have created a demo so you can understand. Any help would be great!

http://jsfiddle.net/gxRC9/4/

body{
    margin:0px;
    padding:0px;
}
.clear{
    clear:both;
}
.container{
    height:2000px;
}
.cover-photo-container{
width:700px;
height: 348px;
margin-bottom: 20px;
background-color:red;
}

.small-box{
    width:163px;
    height:100px;
    border:1px solid blue;
    float:left;
}

.sticky-header{
    width:700px;
    height:50px;
    background:orange;
    postion:fixed;
}
  • you do not do this without the help of JS – Anon Oct 3 '13 at 11:56
  • The problem with this approach and the subsequent answers is that you end up relying on the container being no more than the 2000px that you specify. This would fail in production because either you would need to keep adjusting. Or you would be asking the copywriters to never add more content beyond a certain word count. Either way this approach does not scale. – JGallardo May 8 '14 at 16:35
  • Something with jquery and CSS can help you to achieve sticky header on scroll - kvcodes.com/2017/03/jquery-simple-sticky-header-on-scroll – Kvvaradha Mar 28 '17 at 2:46

10 Answers 10

up vote 88 down vote accepted

You need some JS to do scroll events. The best way to do this is to set a new CSS class for the fixed position that will get assigned to the relevant div when scrolling goes past a certain point.

HTML

<div class="sticky"></div>

CSS

.fixed {
    position: fixed;
    top:0; left:0;
    width: 100%; }

jQuery

$(window).scroll(function(){
  var sticky = $('.sticky'),
      scroll = $(window).scrollTop();

  if (scroll >= 100) sticky.addClass('fixed');
  else sticky.removeClass('fixed');
});

Example fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gxRC9/501/


EDIT: Extended example

If the trigger point is unknown but should be whenever the sticky element reaches the top of the screen, offset().top can be used.

var stickyOffset = $('.sticky').offset().top;

$(window).scroll(function(){
  var sticky = $('.sticky'),
      scroll = $(window).scrollTop();

  if (scroll >= stickyOffset) sticky.addClass('fixed');
  else sticky.removeClass('fixed');
});

Extended example fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gxRC9/502/

  • thanks for your help. can you make the yellow box fixed not the red one? – Paul Designer Oct 3 '13 at 12:04
  • Of course, now you've got that code you can substitute any classes in there. I've updated my answer. – Coop Oct 3 '13 at 12:06
  • You did good trick i don't know why some one downvoted.Any way +1 from me.. cheers:) – sun Oct 3 '13 at 12:10
  • @Coop yes even my answer was perfect too, but still two negative votes.. huh if someone gives negative vote, he/she must explain the reason huh – Vikas Ghodke Oct 3 '13 at 12:10
  • 1
    @CraigJacobs Your issue can be easily solved with a couple of lines of CSS. By ensuring the sticky element is always out of the flow of the site (position: absolute) and relevant padding in the body to make space for it. – Coop Sep 29 '16 at 9:30

I have modified the Coop's answer. Please check the example FIDDLE Here's my edits:

$(window).scroll(function(){
  if ($(window).scrollTop() >= 330) {
    $('.sticky-header').addClass('fixed');
   }
   else {
    $('.sticky-header').removeClass('fixed');
   }
});
  • Best answer so far because this actually worked cleaner when you scroll past the element. – JGallardo May 8 '14 at 16:24
  • Can this be implemented like fix header to top after scrolling landing page div. – Shahil M Dec 5 '16 at 12:53
  • yes it can @Shahil – Mobeen Abdullah Apr 24 '17 at 18:59

I know Coop has already answered this question, but here is a version which also tracks where in the document the div is, rather than relying on a static value:

http://jsfiddle.net/gxRC9/16/

Javascript

var offset = $( ".sticky-header" ).offset();
var sticky = document.getElementById("sticky-header")

$(window).scroll(function() {

    if ( $('body').scrollTop() > offset.top){
        $('.sticky-header').addClass('fixed');
    } else {
         $('.sticky-header').removeClass('fixed');
    } 

});

CSS

.fixed{
     position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
}
  • Yeh offset.top is good. This is actually the more full method I wuld use for responsive designs where div heights are likely to change. – Coop Oct 3 '13 at 12:15
  • Yeap. Not just responsive, it could be anything, like an image changing height, or more or less text in a div above the sticky element. – Rich Oct 3 '13 at 12:18
  • 1
    i was thinking about how Paul Designer going to set his static scroll amount manually every time according to document size. But you did good job @Rich – sun Oct 3 '13 at 12:21
  • Can you specify how many pixels you want the user to scroll before the header snaps into place??? – Paul Designer Oct 3 '13 at 14:32
  • Do you mean, how many pixels past the sticky element? Try this: jsfiddle.net/gxRC9/18 – Rich Oct 3 '13 at 14:39

Coop's answer is excellent.
However it depends on jQuery, here is a version that has no dependencies:

HTML

<div id="sticky" class="sticky"></div>

CSS

.sticky {
  width: 100%
}

.fixed {
  position: fixed;
  top:0;
}

JS
(This uses eyelidlessness's answer for finding offsets in Vanilla JS.)

function findOffset(element) {
  var top = 0, left = 0;

  do {
    top += element.offsetTop  || 0;
    left += element.offsetLeft || 0;
    element = element.offsetParent;
  } while(element);

  return {
    top: top,
    left: left
  };
}

window.onload = function () {
  var stickyHeader = document.getElementById('sticky');
  var headerOffset = findOffset(stickyHeader);

  window.onscroll = function() {
    // body.scrollTop is deprecated and no longer available on Firefox
    var bodyScrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop || document.body.scrollTop;

    if (bodyScrollTop > headerOffset.top) {
      stickyHeader.classList.add('fixed');
    } else {
      stickyHeader.classList.remove('fixed');
    }
  };
};

Example

https://jsbin.com/walabebita/edit?html,css,js,output

Just building on Rich's answer, which uses offset.

I modified this as follows:

  • There was no need for the var $sticky in Rich's example, it wasn't doing anything
  • I've moved the offset check into a separate function, and called it on document ready as well as on scroll so if the page refreshes with the scroll half-way down the page, it resizes straight-away without having to wait for a scroll trigger

    jQuery(document).ready(function($){
        var offset = $( "#header" ).offset();
        checkOffset();
    
        $(window).scroll(function() {
            checkOffset();
        });
    
        function checkOffset() {
            if ( $('body').scrollTop() > offset.top){
                $('#header').addClass('fixed');
            } else {
                $('#header').removeClass('fixed');
            } 
        }
    
    });
    

Coops answer is a good, simple solution, however, once you apply the fixed class the page becomes that much shorter and content will "jump" up, and if page is of a length where the scroll distance is less than the height of the header element, it will appear to jump and not let you see the bottom of the page.

The answer I found was to add a spacer div above the element that will become fixed (nav element in my case), and set it to the same height as the nav element, and set it to display none.

When adding the .fixed class to the nav, show the .nav-spacer div, and when removing it, hide it. Since the height of the page changes instantly I have set the duration to 0.

HTML

<header>the element above the element that will become fixed</header>
<div class="nav-spacer"></div>
<nav></nav>

CSS

nav {
    position: relative;    
    height: 100px;
}
.nav-spacer{
    position: relative;
    height: 100px;
    display: none;
}
.fixed {
    position: fixed;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    width: 100%;
    /* I like to add a shadow on to the fixed element */
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 5px 10px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.25);
    -moz-box-shadow: 0px 5px 10px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.25);
    box-shadow: 0px 5px 10px 1px rgba(0,0,0,0.25);
}

JavaScript

var stickyOffset = $('nav').offset().top;

$(window).scroll(function(){
    if ($(window).scrollTop() >= stickyOffset){
        $('nav').addClass('fixed');
        //this makes the page length equal to what it was before fixing nav
        $('.nav-spacer').show(0); 
    }
    else {
        $('nav').removeClass('fixed');
        $('.nav-spacer').hide(0);
    }
});
 $(document).ready(function(){

    var div=$('#header');
    var start=$(div).offset().top;

    $.event.add(window,'scroll',function(){
        var p=$(window).scrollTop();
        $(div).css('position',(p>start)?'fixed':'static');
        $(div).css('top',(p>start)?'0px':'');

    }); 
});

It works perfectly.

The chosen solution did not fit well in my page. So this is a more advanced version that works with bootstrap.

The javascript

var stickyOffset = $('.sticky-header').offset().top;

$(window).scroll(function () {
    var sticky = $('.sticky-header'),
        scroll = $(window).scrollTop(),
        header = $('.fixed-header-background');
    sticky.each(function() {
        var left = $(this).offset().left;
        $(this).data('left', left);//I store the left offset
    });

    if (scroll >= stickyOffset) {
        sticky.addClass('fixed');
        header.css('display', 'block');
        sticky.each(function() {
            $(this).css('left', $(this).data('left'));//I set the left offset
        });
    } else {
        sticky.removeClass('fixed');
        header.css('display', 'none');
        sticky.each(function () {
            $(this).css('left', '');//I remove the left offset
        });
    }
});

The CSS

.fixed-header-background {
    display: none;
     position: fixed;
    top: 50px;
    width: 100%;
    height: 30px;
    background-color: #fff;
    z-index: 5;
    border-bottom-style: solid;
    border-bottom-color: #dedede;
    border-bottom-width: 2px;
}

.fixed{
     position: fixed;
    top: 52px;
    z-index: 6;
}

And the HTML

    <div class="fixed-header-background"></div>
<table class="table table-hover table-condensed">
        <thead>
            <tr>
                <th></th>
                <th><span class="sticky-header">My header 1</span></th>
                <th><span class="sticky-header">My header 2</span></th>
            </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody>
[....]

        </tbody>
    </table>

Or just simply add a span tag with the height of the fixed header set as its height then insert it next to the sticky header:

$(function() {
  var $span_height = $('.fixed-header').height;
  var $span_tag = '<span style="display:block; height:' + $span_height + 'px"></span>';

  $('.fixed-header').after($span_tag);
});

Hopefully this one piece of an alternate solution will be as valuable to someone else as it was for me.

Situation:
In an HTML5 page I had a menu that was a nav element inside a header (not THE header but a header in another element).
I wanted the navigation to stick to the top once a user scrolled to it, but previous to this the header was absolute positioned (so I could have it overlay something else slightly).
The solutions above never triggered a change because .offsetTop was not going to change as this was an absolute positioned element. Additionally the .scrollTop property was simply the top of the top most element... that is to say 0 and always would be 0.
Any tests I performed utilizing these two (and same with getBoundingClientRect results) would not tell me if the top of the navigation bar ever scrolled to the top of the viewable page (again, as reported in console, they simply stayed the same numbers while scrolling occurred).

Solution
The solution for me was utilizing

window.visualViewport.pageTop

The value of the pageTop property reflects the viewable section of the screen, therefore allowing me to track where an element is in reference to the boundaries of the viewable area.
This allowed a simple function assigned to the scroll event of the window to detect when the top of the navigation bar intersected with the top of the viewable area and apply the styling to make it stick to the top.

Probably unnecessary to say, anytime I am dealing with scrolling I expect to use this solution to programatically respond to movement of elements being scrolled.
Hope it helps someone else.

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