123

I'm learning Go by coding a small personal project. Even though it's small, I decided to do rigorous unit testing to learn good habits on Go right from the start.

Trivial unit tests were all fine and dandy, but I'm puzzled with dependencies now; I want to be able to replace some function calls with mock ones. Here's a snippet of my code:

func get_page(url string) string {
    get_dl_slot(url)
    defer free_dl_slot(url)

    resp, err := http.Get(url)
    if err != nil { return "" }
    defer resp.Body.Close()

    contents, err := ioutil.ReadAll(resp.Body)
    if err != nil { return "" }
    return string(contents)
}

func downloader() {
    dl_slots = make(chan bool, DL_SLOT_AMOUNT) // Init the download slot semaphore
    content := get_page(BASE_URL)
    links_regexp := regexp.MustCompile(LIST_LINK_REGEXP)
    matches := links_regexp.FindAllStringSubmatch(content, -1)
    for _, match := range matches{
        go serie_dl(match[1], match[2])
    }
}

I'd like to be able to test downloader() without actually getting a page through http - i.e. by mocking either get_page (easier since it returns just the page content as a string) or http.Get().

I found this thread: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/golang-nuts/6AN1E2CJOxI which seems to be about a similar problem. Julian Phillips presents his library, Withmock (http://github.com/qur/withmock) as a solution, but I'm unable to get it to work. Here's the relevant parts of my testing code, which is largely cargo cult code to me, to be honest:

import (
    "testing"
    "net/http" // mock
    "code.google.com/p/gomock"
)
...
func TestDownloader (t *testing.T) {
    ctrl := gomock.NewController()
    defer ctrl.Finish()
    http.MOCK().SetController(ctrl)
    http.EXPECT().Get(BASE_URL)
    downloader()
    // The rest to be written
}

The test output is following:

ERROR: Failed to install '_et/http': exit status 1
output:
can't load package: package _et/http: found packages http (chunked.go) and main (main_mock.go) in /var/folders/z9/ql_yn5h550s6shtb9c5sggj40000gn/T/withmock570825607/path/src/_et/http

Is the Withmock a solution to my testing problem? What should I do to get it to work?

  • Since you're diving into Go unit testing, look into GoConvey for a great way to do behavior-driven testing... and teaser: an automatically-updating web UI is coming that also works with native "go test" tests. – Matt Oct 4 '13 at 18:42
163

Kudos to you for practicing good testing! :)

Personally, I don't use gomock (or any mocking framework for that matter; mocking in Go is very easy without it). I would either pass a dependency to the downloader() function as a parameter, or I would make downloader() a method on a type, and the type can hold the get_page dependency:

Method 1: Pass get_page() as a parameter of downloader()

type PageGetter func(url string) string

func downloader(pageGetterFunc PageGetter) {
    // ...
    content := pageGetterFunc(BASE_URL)
    // ...
}

Main:

func get_page(url string) string { /* ... */ }

func main() {
    downloader(get_page)
}

Test:

func mock_get_page(url string) string {
    // mock your 'get_page()' function here
}

func TestDownloader(t *testing.T) {
    downloader(mock_get_page)
}

Method2: Make download() a method of a type Downloader:

If you don't want to pass the dependency as a parameter, you could also make get_page() a member of a type, and make download() a method of that type, which can then use get_page:

type PageGetter func(url string) string

type Downloader struct {
    get_page PageGetter
}

func NewDownloader(pg PageGetter) *Downloader {
    return &Downloader{get_page: pg}
}

func (d *Downloader) download() {
    //...
    content := d.get_page(BASE_URL)
    //...
}

Main:

func get_page(url string) string { /* ... */ }

func main() {
    d := NewDownloader(get_page)
    d.download()
}

Test:

func mock_get_page(url string) string {
    // mock your 'get_page()' function here
}

func TestDownloader() {
    d := NewDownloader(mock_get_page)
    d.download()
}
  • 4
    Thanks a lot! I went with the second one. (there was some other functions too that I wanted to mock, so it was easier to assign them to a struct) Btw. I'm a bit love in Go. Especially its concurrency features are neat! – GolDDranks Oct 4 '13 at 3:53
  • 108
    Am I the only one finding that for the sake of testing we have to change the main code / functions signature is terrible? – Thomas May 28 '14 at 23:06
  • 24
    @Thomas I'm not sure if you're the only one, but it's actually the fundamental reason for test driven development--your testing guides the way you write your production code. Testable code is more modular. In this case, the Downloader object's 'get_page' behavior is now pluggable--we can dynamically change its implementation. You only have to change your main code if it was badly written in the first place. – weberc2 May 29 '14 at 13:37
  • 17
    @Thomas I don't understand your second sentence. TDD drives better code. Your code changes in order to be testable (because testable code is necessarily modular with well-thought-out interfaces), but the primary purpose is to have better code--having automated tests is just an awesome secondary benefit. If your concern is that functional code is being changed simply to add tests after the fact, I would still recommend changing it simply because there's a good possibility that someone someday will want to read that code or change it. – weberc2 Aug 7 '14 at 13:55
  • 5
    @Thomas of course, if you're writing your tests as you go along, you won't have to deal with that conundrum. – weberc2 Aug 7 '14 at 13:56
14

If you change your function definition to use a variable instead:

var get_page = func(url string) string {
    ...
}

You can override it in your tests:

func TestDownloader(t *testing.T) {
    get_page = func(url string) string {
        if url != "expected" {
            t.Fatal("good message")
        }
        return "something"
    }
    downloader()
}

Careful though, your other tests might fail if they test the functionality of the function you override!

The Go authors use this pattern in the Go standard library to insert test hooks into code to make things easier to test:

https://golang.org/src/net/hook.go

https://golang.org/src/net/dial.go#L248

https://golang.org/src/net/dial_test.go#L701

  • 5
    Downvote if you want, this is an acceptable pattern for small packages to avoid boilerplate associated with DI. The variable containing the function is only "global" to the scope of the package since it's not exported. This is a valid option, I mentioned the downside, choose your own adventure. – Jake Oct 30 '14 at 1:46
  • 3
    One thing to note is that function defined this way cannot be recursive. – Ben Sandler Feb 20 '16 at 19:49
  • 2
    I agree with @Jake that this approach has its place. – m.kocikowski Jul 13 '16 at 23:32
9

I'm using a slightly different approach where public struct methods implement interfaces but their logic is limited to just wrapping private (unexported) functions which take those interfaces as parameters. This gives you the granularity you would need to mock virtually any dependency and yet have a clean API to use from outside your test suite.

To understand this it is imperative to understand that you have access to the unexported methods in your test case (i.e. from within your _test.go files) so you test those instead of testing the exported ones which have no logic inside beside wrapping.

To summarize: test the unexported functions instead of testing the exported ones!

Let's make an example. Say that we have a Slack API struct which has two methods:

  • the SendMessage method which sends an HTTP request to a Slack webhook
  • the SendDataSynchronously method which given a slice of strings iterates over them and calls SendMessage for every iteration

So in order to test SendDataSynchronously without making an HTTP request each time we would have to mock SendMessage, right?

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

// URI interface
type URI interface {
    GetURL() string
}

// MessageSender interface
type MessageSender interface {
    SendMessage(message string) error
}

// This one is the "object" that our users will call to use this package functionalities
type API struct {
    baseURL  string
    endpoint string
}

// Here we make API implement implicitly the URI interface
func (api *API) GetURL() string {
    return api.baseURL + api.endpoint
}

// Here we make API implement implicitly the MessageSender interface
// Again we're just WRAPPING the sendMessage function here, nothing fancy 
func (api *API) SendMessage(message string) error {
    return sendMessage(api, message)
}

// We want to test this method but it calls SendMessage which makes a real HTTP request!
// Again we're just WRAPPING the sendDataSynchronously function here, nothing fancy
func (api *API) SendDataSynchronously(data []string) error {
    return sendDataSynchronously(api, data)
}

// this would make a real HTTP request
func sendMessage(uri URI, message string) error {
    fmt.Println("This function won't get called because we will mock it")
    return nil
}

// this is the function we want to test :)
func sendDataSynchronously(sender MessageSender, data []string) error {
    for _, text := range data {
        err := sender.SendMessage(text)

        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }

    return nil
}

// TEST CASE BELOW

// Here's our mock which just contains some variables that will be filled for running assertions on them later on
type mockedSender struct {
    err      error
    messages []string
}

// We make our mock implement the MessageSender interface so we can test sendDataSynchronously
func (sender *mockedSender) SendMessage(message string) error {
    // let's store all received messages for later assertions
    sender.messages = append(sender.messages, message)

    return sender.err // return error for later assertions
}

func TestSendsAllMessagesSynchronously() {
    mockedMessages := make([]string, 0)
    sender := mockedSender{nil, mockedMessages}

    messagesToSend := []string{"one", "two", "three"}
    err := sendDataSynchronously(&sender, messagesToSend)

    if err == nil {
        fmt.Println("All good here we expect the error to be nil:", err)
    }

    expectedMessages := fmt.Sprintf("%v", messagesToSend)
    actualMessages := fmt.Sprintf("%v", sender.messages)

    if expectedMessages == actualMessages {
        fmt.Println("Actual messages are as expected:", actualMessages)
    }
}

func main() {
    TestSendsAllMessagesSynchronously()
}

What I like about this approach is that by looking at the unexported methods you can clearly see what the dependencies are. At the same time the API that you export is a lot cleaner and with less parameters to pass along since the true dependency here is just the parent receiver which is implementing all those interfaces itself. Yet every function is potentially depending only on one part of it (one, maybe two interfaces) which makes refactors a lot easier. It's nice to see how your code is really coupled just by looking at the functions signatures, I think it makes a powerful tool against smelling code.

To make things easy I put everything into one file to allow you to run the code in the playground here but I suggest you also check out the full example on GitHub, here is the slack.go file and here the slack_test.go.

And here the whole thing :)

  • This is actually an interesting approach and the tidbit about having access to private methods in the test file is really useful. It reminds me of the pimpl technique in C++. However, I think it should be said that testing private functions is dangerous. Private members are usually considered implementation details and are more likely to change over time than the public interface. As long as you only test the private wrappers around the public interface, though, you should be fine. – c1moore Oct 5 '18 at 0:11
  • Yeah generally speaking I'd agree with you. In this case though the private methods bodies are exactly the same as the public ones so you'll be testing exactly the same thing. The only difference between the two are the function arguments. That's the trick that allows you to inject any dependency (mocked or not) as needed. – Francesco Casula Oct 5 '18 at 14:37
  • Yeah, I agree. I was just saying as long as you limit it to private methods that wrap those public ones, you should be good to go. Just don't start testing the private methods that are implementation details. – c1moore Oct 5 '18 at 21:16
6

I would do something like,

Main

var getPage = get_page
func get_page (...

func downloader() {
    dl_slots = make(chan bool, DL_SLOT_AMOUNT) // Init the download slot semaphore
    content := getPage(BASE_URL)
    links_regexp := regexp.MustCompile(LIST_LINK_REGEXP)
    matches := links_regexp.FindAllStringSubmatch(content, -1)
    for _, match := range matches{
        go serie_dl(match[1], match[2])
    }
}

Test

func TestDownloader (t *testing.T) {
    origGetPage := getPage
    getPage = mock_get_page
    defer func() {getPage = origGatePage}()
    // The rest to be written
}

// define mock_get_page and rest of the codes
func mock_get_page (....

And I would avoid _ in golang. Better use camelCase

  • 1
    would it be possible in go to develop a package that could do this for you. I'm thinking something like: p := patch(mockGetPage, getPage); defer p.done(). I am new to go, and was trying to do this using the unsafe library, but seems impossible to do in the general case. – vitiral Nov 8 '15 at 19:44
  • @Fallen this is almost exactly my answer written over a year after mine was. – Jake Apr 5 '16 at 14:30
  • 1
    1. The only similarity is the global var way. @Jake 2. Simple is better than complex. weberc2 – Fallen Apr 5 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    @fallen I don't consider your example to be simpler. Passing arguments is not more complex than mutating global state, but relying on global state introduces a lot of problems that don't exist otherwise. For example, you will have to deal with race conditions if you want to parallelize your tests. – weberc2 Apr 18 '16 at 17:50
  • It's almost the same, but it's not :). In this answer, I see how to assign a function to a var and how this allows me to assign a different implementation for tests. I cannot change the arguments on the function I'm testing, so this is a nice solution for me. The alternative is to use Receiver with mock struct, I don't know yet which one is simpler. – alexbt Mar 16 '17 at 17:15
-1

Considering unit test is the domain of this question, highly recommend you to use https://github.com/bouk/monkey. This Package make you to mock test without changing your original source code. Compare to other answer, it's more "non-intrusive"。

MAIN

type AA struct {
 //...
}
func (a *AA) OriginalFunc() {
//...
}

MOCK TEST

var a *AA

func NewFunc(a *AA) {
 //...
}

monkey.PatchMethod(reflect.TypeOf(a), "OriginalFunc", NewFunc)

Bad side is :

-- Reminded by Dave.C, This method is unsafe. So don't use it outside of unit test.

- Is non-idiomatic Go.

Good side is :

++ Is non-intrusive. Make you do things without changing the main code. Like Thomas said.

++ Make you change behavior of package (maybe provided by third party) with least code.

  • Please don't do this. It's completely unsafe and can break various Go internals. Not to mention it's not even remotely idiomatic Go. – Dave C Aug 8 at 11:46
  • @DaveC I respect your experience about Golang, but suspect your opinion. 1. Safety does not mean all for software development, do feature-rich and convenience matter. 2. Idiomatic Golang is not Golang, is part of it. If one project is open-source, it's common for other people to play dirty on it. Community should encourage it at least not suppress it. – Frank Wang Aug 8 at 12:30
  • The language is called Go. By unsafe I mean it can break the Go runtime, things like garbage collection. – Dave C Aug 8 at 16:05
  • To me, unsafe is cool for a unit test. If refactoring code with more 'interface' is needed every time a unit test is made. It fits me more that use an unsafe way to solve it. – Frank Wang Aug 9 at 2:39

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