1

Take the following example:

MyDataContext context = new MyDataContext(); // DB connection established.
MyTableRecord myEntity = myDataContext.Table.FindEntity(12345); // retrieve entity

Say my entity has relationships with other tables which I would access via

foreach (var record in MyEntity.RelatedTable)

Do I need to keep my DataContext alive after the 2nd line in order to access the properties of the entities or is it safe enough to dispose of?

I understand Linq to SQL uses delayed execution hence I am wondering if it only uses delayed execution when you initially retrieve the entity or whether it uses this when accessing the related table records aswell.

Example

var userRepo = new UserRepository(); // creates new DataContext
var auditRepo = new AuditRepository(); // creates new DataContext
var activeUsers = userRepo.FindActiveUsers();
foreach (var user in activeUsers)
{
    // do something with the  user
    var audit = new Audit();
    audit.Date = DateTime.Now;
    audit.UserID = user.ID;
    auditRepo.Insert(audit);
}

My insert method in my repo calls SubmitChanges. So is the above acceptable, or is this a waste of a connection. Should I realistically do:

var userRepo = new UserRepository();
var activeUsers = userRepo.FindActiveUsers();
foreach (var user in activeUsers)
{
    // do something with user
    var audit = new Audit();
    audit.Date = DateTime.Now;
    audit.UserID = user.ID;
    user.Audits.Add(audit);
    userRepo.Save();
}

To re-use the already open DataContext? What would you do in situations where you open a high-level datacontext and then had to do some processing low level, should I pass the userRepo down or should I create a separate Repository?

2 Answers 2

4

To access fields in other tables you will need to keep the DataContext alive. Also, don't call dispose directly, use the using keyword.

using (MyDataContext context = new MyDataContext()) // DB connection established.
{
    MyTableRecord myEntity = myDataContext.Table.FindEntity(12345); // retrieve entity

    foreach (var record in MyEntity.RelatedTable)
    {
        ...
    }
}
2
  • IS it always advised to use a using statement when dealing with repos? I have created custom Repositories that I am using and sometimes it doesn't seem a good idea to wrap all my code up in using statements
    – James
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:07
  • 1
    You mean you have some custom written code that only you work on and you can guarantee that it does not hold onto any resources longer than necessary if you omit the Dispose call, and never will do in the future? Then in your situation, I guess it's OK to not call using. But in general it's good practice to call using on any object that implements IDisposable. You won't leak anything if you don't: the garbage collector will clean up undisposed objects that go out of scope. But you don't know when the garbage collector will run, if ever.
    – Mark Byers
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:36
3

You don't need to dispose of the DataContext as it's a lightweight object and all internal db connections are cached. If you do dispose of it you won't be able to access the related entities.

7
  • So L2S also uses delayed execution when accessing related entities aswell?
    – James
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:04
  • Yes, it uses delayed execution unless you use the DataContext.LoadWith method
    – user226722
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:06
  • Thanks for the tip! Never realised this option was available
    – James
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:09
  • No worries! Using the LoadWith option will improve performance in most circumstances as the sql query loads all the data it needs in one go rather than running another query for each related entity as it's accessed (N+1 issue).
    – user226722
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:11
  • Say you have a scenario where you need to open 2 datacontexts at once? Is this normally a good idea or is there a better way?
    – James
    Dec 16, 2009 at 21:24

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