7

I am trying to create a derived class from a generic class, and I was wondering what the differences are between

public class A<T> : B<T> where T : C
{
}

and

public class A: B<C>
{
}

Inside class A there probably will be no code, since (for now) it will not behave different from class B. I only want to distinguish the two classes.

Thanks in advance.

8

Say you had a class

public class D : C
{
}

Then in your first example the below is valid.

var a = new A<D>

You can use any class for T that is ultimately derived from C.

Whereas your second code is hard coded to have B use C for the genric type parameter and is not generic.

2

It is a Constraints with generics in C#, for sample:

In

public class A<T> : B<T> where T : C
{
}

The generic T must be a C type or a child of it (what is a abstraction).

In

public class A: B<C>
{
}

The generic is C.

2

In your first example, A is a generic class, of type C. It also inherits from class B of type C.

Your second example has the following properties:

A is not a generic class. It inherits from class B of type C.

So, they are actually quite different.

1

In the first example you are making the the A Class as a generic class that that T must be given when instantiating the class.

A<C> instance = new A<C>();

In the second example, The A Class is not a generic class, since when instantiating the A Class there is no need to declare the T since its done automatically behind the scenes based on the A Class declaration.

A instance = new A();

Another difference

If you have the given hierarchical inheritance tree:

enter image description here

At the first example, when you instantiate the A class, every one of the inherited class can be used as the T.

At the second example, you can Instantiate the A class and specify the C2 class, so only classes that inherit from C2 can be used insde the A class.

0

In second option you will end up with a non-generic class A, whereas in the First option you will have generic class A

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