30

If I have a native C++ windows program (i.e. the entry point is WinMain) how do I view output from console functions like std::cout?

  • 1
    Are you trying to read your output or another applications output? – Mark Ingram Oct 10 '08 at 15:26

11 Answers 11

21

Check out Adding Console I/O to a Win32 GUI App. This may help you do what you want.

If you don't have, or can't modify the code, try the suggestions found here to redirect console output to a file.


Edit: bit of thread necromancy here. I first answered this 9ish years ago, in the early days of SO, before the (good) policy of non-link-only answers came into effect. I'll repost the code from the original article in the hope to atone for my past sins.

guicon.cpp -- A console redirection function

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <io.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#ifndef _USE_OLD_IOSTREAMS
using namespace std;
#endif
// maximum mumber of lines the output console should have
static const WORD MAX_CONSOLE_LINES = 500;
#ifdef _DEBUG
void RedirectIOToConsole()
{
    int hConHandle;
    long lStdHandle;
    CONSOLE_SCREEN_BUFFER_INFO coninfo;
    FILE *fp;

    // allocate a console for this app
    AllocConsole();

    // set the screen buffer to be big enough to let us scroll text
    GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), &coninfo);
    coninfo.dwSize.Y = MAX_CONSOLE_LINES;
    SetConsoleScreenBufferSize(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), coninfo.dwSize);

    // redirect unbuffered STDOUT to the console
    lStdHandle = (long)GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
    hConHandle = _open_osfhandle(lStdHandle, _O_TEXT);
    fp = _fdopen( hConHandle, "w" );
    *stdout = *fp;
    setvbuf( stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0 );

    // redirect unbuffered STDIN to the console
    lStdHandle = (long)GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE);
    hConHandle = _open_osfhandle(lStdHandle, _O_TEXT);
    fp = _fdopen( hConHandle, "r" );
    *stdin = *fp;
    setvbuf( stdin, NULL, _IONBF, 0 );

    // redirect unbuffered STDERR to the console
    lStdHandle = (long)GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE);
    hConHandle = _open_osfhandle(lStdHandle, _O_TEXT);
    fp = _fdopen( hConHandle, "w" );
    *stderr = *fp;
    setvbuf( stderr, NULL, _IONBF, 0 );

    // make cout, wcout, cin, wcin, wcerr, cerr, wclog and clog
    // point to console as well
    ios::sync_with_stdio();
}

#endif
//End of File

guicon.h -- Interface to console redirection function

#ifndef __GUICON_H__
#define __GUICON_H__
#ifdef _DEBUG

void RedirectIOToConsole();

#endif
#endif

// End of File

test.cpp -- Demonstrating console redirection

#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#ifndef _USE_OLD_OSTREAMS
using namespace std;
#endif
#include "guicon.h"


#include <crtdbg.h>

int APIENTRY WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPTSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    #ifdef _DEBUG
    RedirectIOToConsole();
    #endif
    int iVar;

    // test stdio
    fprintf(stdout, "Test output to stdout\n");
    fprintf(stderr, "Test output to stderr\n");
    fprintf(stdout, "Enter an integer to test stdin: ");
    scanf("%d", &iVar);
    printf("You entered %d\n", iVar);

    //test iostreams
    cout << "Test output to cout" << endl;
    cerr << "Test output to cerr" << endl;
    clog << "Test output to clog" << endl;
    cout << "Enter an integer to test cin: ";
    cin >> iVar;
    cout << "You entered " << iVar << endl;
    #ifndef _USE_OLD_IOSTREAMS

    // test wide iostreams
    wcout << L"Test output to wcout" << endl;
    wcerr << L"Test output to wcerr" << endl;
    wclog << L"Test output to wclog" << endl;
    wcout << L"Enter an integer to test wcin: ";
    wcin >> iVar;
    wcout << L"You entered " << iVar << endl;
    #endif

    // test CrtDbg output
    _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_ASSERT, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE );
    _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_ASSERT, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDERR );
    _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_ERROR, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE );
    _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_ERROR, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDERR);
    _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_WARN, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE );
    _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_WARN, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDERR);
    _RPT0(_CRT_WARN, "This is testing _CRT_WARN output\n");
    _RPT0(_CRT_ERROR, "This is testing _CRT_ERROR output\n");
    _ASSERT( 0 && "testing _ASSERT" );
    _ASSERTE( 0 && "testing _ASSERTE" );
    Sleep(2000);
    return 0;
}

//End of File
  • 6
  • 1
    Good link. The gamedev.net forums have always provided me with a wealth of information. – luke Oct 16 '08 at 16:05
  • The links may be helpful, but this answer doesn't contain any more information than those links. If those become inaccessible, this answer is no longer helpful. – IInspectable Feb 20 '17 at 9:40
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Amedee Van Gasse Feb 20 '17 at 10:23
  • @AmedeeVanGasse please see edits – luke Feb 20 '17 at 13:52
9

You can also reopen the cout and cerr streams to output to a file as well. The following should work for this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main ()
{
    std::ofstream file;
    file.open ("cout.txt");
    std::streambuf* sbuf = std::cout.rdbuf();
    std::cout.rdbuf(file.rdbuf());
    //cout is now pointing to a file
    return 0;
}
5

Using a combination of luke's answer and Roger's answer here worked for me in my Windows Desktop Application project.

void RedirectIOToConsole() {

    //Create a console for this application
    AllocConsole();

    // Get STDOUT handle
    HANDLE ConsoleOutput = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
    int SystemOutput = _open_osfhandle(intptr_t(ConsoleOutput), _O_TEXT);
    FILE *COutputHandle = _fdopen(SystemOutput, "w");

    // Get STDERR handle
    HANDLE ConsoleError = GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE);
    int SystemError = _open_osfhandle(intptr_t(ConsoleError), _O_TEXT);
    FILE *CErrorHandle = _fdopen(SystemError, "w");

    // Get STDIN handle
    HANDLE ConsoleInput = GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE);
    int SystemInput = _open_osfhandle(intptr_t(ConsoleInput), _O_TEXT);
    FILE *CInputHandle = _fdopen(SystemInput, "r");

    //make cout, wcout, cin, wcin, wcerr, cerr, wclog and clog point to console as well
    ios::sync_with_stdio(true);

    // Redirect the CRT standard input, output, and error handles to the console
    freopen_s(&CInputHandle, "CONIN$", "r", stdin);
    freopen_s(&COutputHandle, "CONOUT$", "w", stdout);
    freopen_s(&CErrorHandle, "CONOUT$", "w", stderr);

    //Clear the error state for each of the C++ standard stream objects. We need to do this, as
    //attempts to access the standard streams before they refer to a valid target will cause the
    //iostream objects to enter an error state. In versions of Visual Studio after 2005, this seems
    //to always occur during startup regardless of whether anything has been read from or written to
    //the console or not.
    std::wcout.clear();
    std::cout.clear();
    std::wcerr.clear();
    std::cerr.clear();
    std::wcin.clear();
    std::cin.clear();

}
  • Excellent solution. – Norbert Boros Mar 2 '18 at 21:49
  • Out-of-the-box-working-code. Thank you. – Varaquilex Mar 26 '18 at 0:13
  • The block above ios::sync_with_stdio is not required. Moreover, it causes three FILE instances allocated there with _fdopen calls to be leaked because it's an output argument for freopen_s. – Angstrom Jun 8 at 12:00
3

creating a pipe, execute the program console CreateProcess() and read with ReadFile() or writes in console WriteFile()

    HANDLE hRead ; // ConsoleStdInput
    HANDLE hWrite; // ConsoleStdOutput and ConsoleStdError

    STARTUPINFO           stiConsole;
    SECURITY_ATTRIBUTES   segConsole;
    PROCESS_INFORMATION   priConsole;

    segConsole.nLength = sizeof(segConsole);
    segConsole.lpSecurityDescriptor = NULL;
    segConsole.bInheritHandle = TRUE;

if(CreatePipe(&hRead,&hWrite,&segConsole,0) )
{

    FillMemory(&stiConsole,sizeof(stiConsole),0);
    stiConsole.cb = sizeof(stiConsole);
GetStartupInfo(&stiConsole);
stiConsole.hStdOutput = hWrite;
stiConsole.hStdError  = hWrite;
stiConsole.dwFlags    = STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW | STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
stiConsole.wShowWindow = SW_HIDE; // execute hide 

    if(CreateProcess(NULL, "c:\\teste.exe",NULL,NULL,TRUE,NULL,
      NULL,NULL,&stiConsole,&priConsole) == TRUE)
    {
        //readfile and/or writefile
}    

}

3

If you are sending the output of your program to a file or pipe, e.g.

myprogram.exe > file.txt
myprogram.exe | anotherprogram.exe

or you are invoking your program from another program and capturing its output through a pipe, then you don't need to change anything. It will just work, even if the entry point is WinMain.

However, if you are running your program in a console or in Visual Studio, then the output will not appear in the console or in the Output window of Visual Studio. If you want to see the output "live", then try one of the other answers.

Basically, this means that standard output works just like with console applications, but it isn't connected to a console in which you are running your application, and there seems to be no easy way to do that (all the other solutions presented here connect the output to a new console window that will pop up when you run your application, even from another console).

2

Don't quote me on this, but the Win32 console API might be what you're looking for. If you're just doing this for debugging purposes, however, you might be more interested in running DebugView and calling the DbgPrint function.

This of course assumes its your application you want sending console output, not reading it from another application. In that case, pipes might be your friend.

  • According to link to DbgPrint it holds that Only kernel-mode drivers can call the DbgPrint routine.. So probably not what most people wants – graywolf May 23 '16 at 7:26
  • Huh. Well, I know there's a user-mode function for logging messages that'll appear in DebugView. I thought that DbgPrint was it, but obviously not. – Chris Charabaruk May 24 '16 at 14:11
  • The user-mode function to dump text that shows up in DebugView is OutputDebugString. – IInspectable Feb 20 '17 at 9:43
2

Go to Project>Project Properties>Linker>System and in the right pane, set SubSystems option to Console(/SUBSYSTEM:CONSOLE)

Then compile your program and run it from console to see whether you command prompt shows your outputs or not.

1

Actually there is a much simpler solution than any proposed so far. Your Windows program will have a WinMain function so just add this "dummy" main function as well

int main()
{
   return WinMain(GetModuleHandle(NULL), NULL, GetCommandLineA(), SW_SHOWNORMAL);
}

You can now compile using MSVC like this

cl /nologo /c /EHsc myprog.c
link /nologo /out:myprog.exe /subsystem:console myprog.obj user32.lib gdi32.lib

(you may need to add more library links)

When you run the program any printf will be written to the command prompt.

If you are using gcc (mingw) to compile for Windows you don't need a dummy main function, just do

gcc -o myprog.exe myprog.c -luser32 -lgdi32

(ie avoid using the -mwindows flag which will prevent writing to a console. That flag will be useful when you create the final GUI release) Again you may need to specify more libraries if using more windows features)

1

Spent all day today trying to get this working correctly. Found answers all over the web that look like luke's and Sev's.

The method does work, but the problem comes when I exit the console, either by calling FreeConsole or just terminating the application normally. In debug mode I see debug assertions about invalid file handles in the CRT clean-up code.

I think the problem is caused partly by the overly complicated redirect process that everyone is using, and partly because the standard IO streams aren't being redirected before exiting.

I do not understand at all the need to use _open_osfhandle and _fdopen in this process.

This is the complete solution that's working for me:

Redirecting Console Standard IO:

bool RedirectConsoleIO()
{
    bool result = true;
    FILE* fp;

    // Redirect STDIN if the console has an input handle
    if (GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        if (freopen_s(&fp, "CONIN$", "r", stdin) != 0)
            result = false;
        else
            setvbuf(stdin, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Redirect STDOUT if the console has an output handle
    if (GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        if (freopen_s(&fp, "CONOUT$", "w", stdout) != 0)
            result = false;
        else
            setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Redirect STDERR if the console has an error handle
    if (GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        if (freopen_s(&fp, "CONOUT$", "w", stderr) != 0)
            result = false;
        else
            setvbuf(stderr, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Make C++ standard streams point to console as well.
    ios::sync_with_stdio(true);

    // Clear the error state for each of the C++ standard streams.
    std::wcout.clear();
    std::cout.clear();
    std::wcerr.clear();
    std::cerr.clear();
    std::wcin.clear();
    std::cin.clear();

    return result;
}

Releasing a Console:

bool ReleaseConsole()
{
    bool result = true;
    FILE* fp;

    // Just to be safe, redirect standard IO to NUL before releasing.

    // Redirect STDIN to NUL
    if (freopen_s(&fp, "NUL:", "r", stdin) != 0)
        result = false;
    else
        setvbuf(stdin, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Redirect STDOUT to NUL
    if (freopen_s(&fp, "NUL:", "w", stdout) != 0)
        result = false;
    else
        setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Redirect STDERR to NUL
    if (freopen_s(&fp, "NUL:", "w", stderr) != 0)
        result = false;
    else
        setvbuf(stderr, NULL, _IONBF, 0);

    // Detach from console
    if (!FreeConsole() || !result)
        return false;

    return true;
}

Resizing Console Buffer:

void AdjustConsoleBuffer(int16_t minLength)
{
    // Set the screen buffer to be big enough to scroll some text
    CONSOLE_SCREEN_BUFFER_INFO conInfo;
    GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), &conInfo);
    if (conInfo.dwSize.Y < minLength)
        conInfo.dwSize.Y = minLength;
    SetConsoleScreenBufferSize(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), conInfo.dwSize);
}

Allocating a New Console:

bool CreateNewConsole(int16_t minLength)
{
    bool result = false;

    // Release any current console and redirect IO to NUL
    ReleaseConsole();

    // Attempt to create new console
    if (AllocConsole())
    {
        AdjustConsoleBuffer(minLength);
        result = RedirectConsoleIO();
    }

    return result;
}

Attaching to Parent's Console:

bool AttachParentConsole(int16_t minLength)
{
    bool result = false;

    // Release any current console and redirect IO to NUL
    ReleaseConsole();

    // Attempt to attach to parent process's console
    if (AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS))
    {
        AdjustConsoleBuffer(minLength);
        result = RedirectConsoleIO();
    }

    return result;
}

Calling from WinMain:

Link with /SUBSYSTEM:Windows

int APIENTRY WinMain(
    HINSTANCE /*hInstance*/,
    HINSTANCE /*hPrevInstance*/,
    LPTSTR    /*lpCmdLine*/,
    int       /*cmdShow*/)
{
    if (CreateNewConsole(1024))
    {
        int i;

        // test stdio
        fprintf(stdout, "Test output to stdout\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "Test output to stderr\n");
        fprintf(stdout, "Enter an integer to test stdin: ");
        scanf("%d", &i);
        printf("You entered %d\n", i);

        // test iostreams
        cout << "Test output to cout" << endl;
        cerr << "Test output to cerr" << endl;
        clog << "Test output to clog" << endl;
        cout << "Enter an integer to test cin: ";
        cin >> i;
        cout << "You entered " << i << endl;

        std::cout << endl << "Press any key to continue..." << endl;
        _getch();

        ReleaseConsole();
    }

    return 0;
};
0

Since there's no console window, this is impossible difficult. (Learn something new every day - I never knew about the console functions!)

Is it possible for you to replace your output calls? I will often use TRACE or OutputDebugString to send information to the Visual Studio output window.

  • 2
    Actually, it is possible, but tricky, to get a console window for programs using the WinMain() entry point instead of main(). – Chris Charabaruk Oct 10 '08 at 15:30
  • @ChrisCharabaruk: It's not really tricky to call AllocConsole. This is explained under creation of a console. Besides, the name of the user-provided entry point does not control creation of a console. It's the PE header entry for the subsystem that does (WINDOWS vs. CONSOLE). Visual Studio uses that linker setting to control, which user-provided entry point the CRT's startup code calls into. – IInspectable Feb 20 '17 at 9:50
0

As mentioned there and there the easiest solution is to use your Project Property Pages to switch back and forth between CONSOLE and WINDOWS SubSytems to enable or disable console output at will.

Project Properties

Your program will just need main and WinMain entry points to make sure both configuration are compiling. The main function simply calling WinMain as shown below for instance:

int main()
{
cout << "Output standard\n";
cerr << "Output error\n";

return WinMain(GetModuleHandle(NULL), NULL, GetCommandLineA(), SW_SHOWNORMAL);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.