4

I want to write a simple c program in turbo c++ 4.5 editor such that in only wait 5 seconds for user input. As an example,

#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
  int value = 0;
  printf("Enter a non-zero number: ");

  // wait only 5 seconds for user input
  scanf("%d",&value);
  if(value != 0) {
    printf("User input a number");
  } else {
    printf("User dont give input");
  }
}

So, what will be the code for 5 seconds wait for 'scanf' functionality and otherwise execute if-else part.

  • 2
    man select. Use a timeout for select. You will not be able to use scanf, but will have to read. This will be a good exercise. – William Pursell Oct 4 '13 at 16:16
  • 3
    turbo c++ 4.5 ? ahh, come on its 2K13 – P0W Oct 4 '13 at 16:18
  • 2
    @P0W; I bet you he is an Engineering student. – haccks Oct 4 '13 at 16:38
  • 1
    @haccks: +1, Funny – mirabilos Oct 5 '13 at 14:52
9

Try a select(2) loop: https://www.mirbsd.org/man2/select on stdin (fd#0) with a timeout of 5 seconds; run the scanf(3) only if select returns indicating there is data. (See the c_read() function in the mksh source code for an example.)

Other functions, like poll(2), are also possible. Nonblocking I/O is a bit overkill.

OK, here’s a working (on MirBSD) example using select:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <err.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int
main(void)
{
    int value = 0;
    struct timeval tmo;
    fd_set readfds;

    printf("Enter a non-zero number: ");
    fflush(stdout);

    /* wait only 5 seconds for user input */
    FD_ZERO(&readfds);
    FD_SET(0, &readfds);
    tmo.tv_sec = 5;
    tmo.tv_usec = 0;

    switch (select(1, &readfds, NULL, NULL, &tmo)) {
    case -1:
        err(1, "select");
        break;
    case 0:
        printf("User dont give input");
        return (1);
    }

    scanf("%d", &value);
    if (value != 0) {
        printf("User input a number");
    } else {
        printf("User dont give input");
    }
    return (0);
}

You might want to play with the exit codes a bit and sprinkle a few \n throughout the code. The fflush(stdout); is important so that the prompt is shown in the first place…

  • Nice solution. Tested on Linux, no async-io overhead occurred. strace – hek2mgl Dec 9 '13 at 19:49
  • Linux is using inotify under the hood. wouldn't have expected that! :) – hek2mgl Dec 9 '13 at 19:50
  • Me neither. kdump without input and kdump with input on MirBSD (with -static). – mirabilos Dec 9 '13 at 19:56
  • I don't know what inotify is, but yes, this means that, other than the select() syscall, there is no overhead for this solution. Feel free to browse the manual pages of the various BSDs for this. – mirabilos Dec 9 '13 at 20:07
  • let us continue this discussion in chat – hek2mgl Dec 9 '13 at 20:21
2
#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>

void handler(int signo)
{
  return;
}

int main()
{
  int x;
  struct sigaction sa;

  sa.sa_handler = handler;
  sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
  sa.sa_flags = 0;
  sigaction(SIGALRM, &sa, NULL);

  alarm(5);

  if (scanf("%d", &x) == 1)
  {
    printf("%d\n", x);
    alarm(0); // cancel the alarm
  }
  else
  {
    printf("timedout\n");
  }
  return 0;
}
  • That has race conditions… you really must disable the alarm ASAP. (Also, what if it triggers inside of scanf?) – mirabilos Oct 5 '13 at 14:42
0

well you can use the halfdelay() function from the curses library

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