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I am still not quite fully understanding Abstract Base Classes. This is what I have created for my assignment and it seems to mostly work except that it won't return anything that was added through the derived classes. Whenever I choose hasDMA or lacksDMA I don't get the result returned from color or style.

Main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
#include "DMA.h"

using namespace std;

const int RECORDS = 1;
const int LEN = 40;

int main()
{
    ABC * p_records[RECORDS];

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < RECORDS; i++)
    {
        char temp[LEN];
        int temprate;
        char choice;

        cout << "\nEnter label name: ";
        cin.getline(temp, LEN);
        cout << "Enter Rating: ";
        cin >> temprate;

        cout << "Enter 1 for lacksDMA or 2 for hasDMA: ";
        while (cin >> choice && (choice != '1' && choice != '2'))
            cout << "Enter 1, 2: ";
        if (choice == '1')
        {
            char tempcolor[LEN];
            cout << "Enter the color: ";
            cin.getline(tempcolor, LEN);
            p_records[i] = new lacksDMA(temp, temprate, tempcolor);         
        }
        else
        {
            char tempstyle[LEN];
            cout << "Enter the style: ";
            cin.getline(tempstyle, LEN);
            p_records[i] = new hasDMA(tempstyle, temp, temprate);           
        }
        while (cin.get() != '\n')
            continue;
    }
    cout << endl;
    for (i = 0; i < RECORDS; i++)
    {
        p_records[i]->View();
        cout << endl;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < RECORDS; i++)
    {
        delete p_records[i];
    }

    cout << "\nPress any key to continue...";
    cin.sync();
    _getch();

    return 0;
}

DMA.cpp

#include "DMA.h"

using namespace std;


ABC::ABC(const char * l, int r)
{
    label = new char [strlen(l) + 1];
    strcpy(label, l);
    rating = r;
}

ABC::ABC(const ABC & rs)
{
    label = new char[strlen(rs.label) + 1];
    strcpy(label, rs.label);
    rating = rs.rating;
}

ABC::~ABC()
{   
}

ABC & ABC::operator=(const ABC & rs)
{
    if (this == &rs)
        return *this;
    delete [] label;
    label = new char[strlen(rs.label) + 1];
    strcpy(label, rs.label);
    rating = rs.rating;
    return *this;
}

ostream & operator<<(ostream & os, const ABC & rs)
{
    rs.View();
    return os;
}

void ABC::View() const
{
    cout << "\nLabel: " << label << endl;
    cout << "Rating: " << rating << endl;
}

baseDMA::baseDMA(const char * l, int r) : ABC(l,r)
{
}

lacksDMA::lacksDMA(const char * l, int r, const char * c) : ABC(l,r)
{
    strncpy(color, c, 39);
    color[39] = '\0';
}

lacksDMA::lacksDMA(const ABC &rs, const char * c) : ABC(rs)
{
    strncpy(color, c, 39);
    color[39] = '\0';
}

void lacksDMA::View() const
{
    ABC::View();
    cout << "Color: " << color << endl; 
}

hasDMA::hasDMA(const char * s, const char * l, int r) : ABC(l,r)
{
    style = new char [strlen(s) + 1];
    strcpy(style, s);   
}

hasDMA::hasDMA(const char * s, const ABC & rs) : ABC(rs)
{
    style = new char [strlen(s) + 1];
    strcpy(style, s);
}

hasDMA::hasDMA(const hasDMA & hs) : ABC(hs)
{
    style = new char [strlen(hs.style) + 1];
    strcpy(style, hs.style);
}

hasDMA::~hasDMA()
{
    delete [] style;
}

void hasDMA::View() const
{
    ABC::View();
    cout << "Style: " << style << endl;
}

DMA.h

#ifndef DMA_H_
#define DMA_H_
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

// Abstract Base Class
class ABC
{
private:
    char * label;
    int rating;
public:
    ABC(const char * l = "null", int r = 0);
    ABC(const ABC & rs);
    virtual ~ABC() = 0;
    virtual ABC & operator=(const ABC & rs);
    virtual void View() const;
    friend ostream & operator<<(ostream & os, const ABC & rs);
};

// Former Base Class Using DMA
class baseDMA: public ABC
{
private:

public:
    baseDMA(const char * l = "null", int r = 0);
};

// derived class without DMA
// no destructor needed
// uses implicit copy constructor
// uses implicit assignment operator
class lacksDMA : public ABC
{
private:
    char color[40];
public:
    lacksDMA(const char * l = "null", int r = 0, const char * c = "blank");     
    lacksDMA(const ABC & rs, const char * c);
    virtual void View() const;
};

// derived class with DMA
class hasDMA : public ABC
{
private:
    char * style;
public:
    hasDMA(const char * s = "none", const char * l = "null", int r = 0);
    hasDMA(const char * s, const ABC & rs);
    hasDMA(const hasDMA & hs);
    ~hasDMA();
    hasDMA & operator = (const hasDMA & rs);
    void View() const;
};

#endif
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  • 3
    This is way too much of code. Please post the section where you seem the problem is.
    – Saksham
    Oct 5, 2013 at 11:00
  • 1
    How about std::string and std::vector??? Your code is full of dynamic allocation... God help those who will have to debug it.
    – LihO
    Oct 5, 2013 at 11:00
  • I don't see any problem with the code (except that you should delete[] label in ABC::~ABC(), or better yet make it std::string). Make sure that your code is identical to the code posted here. Also, describe example input, expected output, and actual output. Oct 5, 2013 at 11:17
  • Make sure that in your code ABC::View is really declared as virtual, and that keyword const is either in all 3 function signatures, or in none of them. That is most important part. Oct 5, 2013 at 11:21
  • When I run it and I put in Test for label, 10 for rating and select 1 for lacks DMA it then asks for color which it should and I enter red. Everything seems to be going good at that point. When the record is displayed however the label and rating are correct but nothing displays for color. It only displays Color: Oct 5, 2013 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

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In the comments you said that the string "Color:" is displayed, but the examaple input "red" is not displayed. Because "Color:" is displayed this is not an issue of something failing in the abstract/virtual part of the code (otherwise even "Color:" would not be displayed).

The fail is in the input. When you read the choice of '1' or '2' you read only that one character, but the user actually entered extra new line as well, and so next cin.getline will consume this extra new line and return an empty string. You should stick with the cin.getline for all the input, even if the input is just one character, and even if the input is a number. It is easier to never use cin >>, and handle the errors in input by yourself than to mix operator>> with getline and then handle all border cases when they don't play nice together.

Altough this is not part of the answer, here are some general advices:

1) In C++ avoid new char[x] whenever possible. Use std::string for strings and std::vector<char> for very rare cases when std::string is not good enough.

1b) You forgot to delete [] label in destructor of ABC. If it was a std::string you wouldn't have to worry about these things.

2) It is okay to use namespace std in source files (.cpp), and only after all the #includes, but never use it in header files (.h). Never! Use full names in header files (like std::string instead of string)

EDIT: So, some code example is required. Like I said, stick with cin.getline, and avoid operator>>, even if the input is just one character, and even if the input is an integer:

Replace line cin >> temprate; with this:

    cin.getline(temp, LEN);
    temprate = strtol(temp, NULL, 10);

Replace two lines of while loop

    while (cin >> choice && (choice != '1' && choice != '2'))
        cout << "Enter 1, 2: ";

with these lines of for with exit in the middle (my preferred way of endless looping):

    for (;;)
    {
        cin.getline(temp, LEN);
        choice = temp[0];

        if (choice == '1' || choice == '2')
            break;

        cout << "Enter 1, 2: ";
    }
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  • So basically when I am asking for input for the hasDMA or lacksDMA it is carrying over a blank line into the next question? Oct 5, 2013 at 13:14
  • Yes, new-line in input is not consumed by cin >> choice part of the code. Oct 5, 2013 at 13:18
  • Even if I change the input for choice to an integer it's still not working. I can't seem to figure out how to get this input without carrying over a blank spot. Oct 5, 2013 at 13:25
  • Thanks a lot. Sorry I do better with examples and this, although direct, helped a lot. I now see what you mean by using getline instead of cin >>. seeing as temp was used as a holding place for other items though I did have to change the input for the label to tempname and have temp just copy it over using strncpy. Thanks again Oct 6, 2013 at 8:10
  • @user2849274 you're welcome. If this is a correct answer then you should mark it as such, by clicking on white check mark to the left. Oct 6, 2013 at 16:32

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