67

I saw on another question that I could use Counter() to count the number of occurrences in a set of strings. So if I have ['A','B','A','C','A','A'] I get Counter({'A':3,'B':1,'C':1}). But now, how can I use that information to build a histogram for example?

5
  • 2
    If you want to build a histogram I suggest you to use numpy and matplotlib Oct 5, 2013 at 14:38
  • Have a look at matplotlib Oct 5, 2013 at 14:39
  • I was asking more about how to extract the information about each letter. Igonato answered my question.
    – marc
    Oct 5, 2013 at 15:34
  • You can always use the help or dir function on an object in order to find out what methods and attributes are available for it.
    – sjakobi
    Oct 5, 2013 at 15:57
  • this is a good answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/52572094/… Mar 23, 2021 at 18:04

5 Answers 5

83

For your data it is probably better to use a barchart instead of a histogram. Check out this code:

from collections import Counter
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


labels, values = zip(*Counter(['A','B','A','C','A','A']).items())

indexes = np.arange(len(labels))
width = 1

plt.bar(indexes, values, width)
plt.xticks(indexes + width * 0.5, labels)
plt.show()

Result: enter image description here

8
  • 1
    What if OP's data was best suited to a histogram? I know it's late to the game, but I'd like to update your answer to apply to a histogram example (but I'm not sure how to do it yet). That would answer the title to the question. May 16, 2016 at 15:49
  • @ThomasMatthew technically, it is a histogram. "barchart instead of histogram" is more referring to the use of matplotlib.pyplot.bar instead of matplotlib.pyplot.hist. I believe bar goes better with Counter (which is what OP wanted), that's it
    – Igonato
    May 16, 2016 at 22:55
  • Also this is a 3 year old question something might have changed
    – Igonato
    May 16, 2016 at 22:55
  • @ThomasMatthew how did you get there, what were you searching for? Does it score high on google? What query? If it shows on something other than python Counter matplotlib maybe it makes sense to edit the answer
    – Igonato
    May 16, 2016 at 22:57
  • 2
    I searched "build histogram from counter" and it was Google search result #1. It's also almost the same title of OP's question. It's worth an update for all the folks who search that query, which may be a high percentage views on this question. You might get more up votes and favorites you update (add) the histogram example May 17, 2016 at 3:11
17

You can write some really concise code to do this using pandas:

    import numpy as np

    from pandas import Series
    
    sample = np.random.choice(['a', 'b'], size=10)
    
    s = Series(sample)
    
    In [29]: s
    Out[29]:
    0    a
    1    b
    2    b
    3    b
    4    a
    5    b
    6    b
    7    b
    8    b
    9    a
    dtype: object
    
    vc = s.value_counts()
    
    In [31]: vc
    Out[31]:
    b    7
    a    3
    dtype: int64
    
    vc = vc.sort_index()
    
    In [33]: vc
    Out[33]:
    a    3
    b    7
    dtype: int64
    
    c.plot(kind='bar')

Resulting in:

enter image description here

1
  • 3
    But OP specifically asked about Counter. To answer the question, you should show how to go from Counter to Series, unless there's another Pandas type more suited to a dictionary. It's not clear that your solution really applies here--it's just an example of a bar plot. Oct 6, 2020 at 19:24
2

I would like to point an almost one-liner alternative: Convert to Dataframe and plot...

from collections import Counter
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame.from_dict(Counter(['A','B','A','C','A','A']), orient='index', columns=['Some label'])
df.plot.bar()

enter image description here

We can further use plotly the same way:

px.bar(df,title='some title',labels={'value':'count','index':'x_legend','variable':'legend'})

enter image description here

1

Based on Igonato's answer I created a helper module 'plot' with a class 'Plot'.

It has two functions hist() and barchart() two show Igonato's approach as well as using the matplotlib hist functionality directly as might haven been originally intended in the question.

The approach allows adding a title and lables with a given fontsize and displays the y-axis with a tick frequency of 1. You can also change the mode so that it will save the chart with the given title. There are close and debug options for convenience.

python unit test test_Plot.py

'''
Created on 2020-07-05

@author: wf
'''
import unittest


from ptp.plot import Plot

class TestPlot(unittest.TestCase):


    def setUp(self):
        pass


    def tearDown(self):
        pass


    def testPlot(self):
        ''' test a plot based on a Counter '''
        valueList=['A','B','A','C','A','A'];
        plot=Plot(valueList,"barchart example",xlabel="Char",ylabel="frequency")
        plot.barchart(mode='save')
        plot.title="histogram example"
        plot.debug=True
        plot.hist(mode='save')        
        pass


if __name__ == "__main__":
    #import sys;sys.argv = ['', 'Test.testName']
    unittest.main()

Results: barchart example histogram example

debug output:

   value  list:  ['A', 'B', 'A', 'C', 'A', 'A']
counter  items:  dict_items([('A', 4), ('B', 1), ('C', 1)])
counter values:  dict_values([4, 1, 1])
counter   keys:  dict_keys(['A', 'B', 'C'])

plot.py

    '''
Created on 2020-07-05

@author: wf
'''
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from collections import Counter
import numpy as np
import os

class Plot(object):
    '''
    create Plot based on counters
    see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/19198920/using-counter-in-python-to-build-histogram
    '''
    def __init__(self, valueList,title,xlabel=None,ylabel=None,fontsize=12,plotdir=None,debug=False):
        '''
        Constructor
        '''
        self.counter=Counter(valueList)
        self.valueList=valueList
        self.title=title
        self.xlabel=xlabel
        self.ylabel=ylabel
        self.fontsize=fontsize
        self.debug=debug
        path=os.path.dirname(__file__)
        if plotdir is not None:
            self.plotdir=plotdir
        else:
            self.plotdir=path+"/../plots/"
            os.makedirs(self.plotdir,exist_ok=True)
            
    def titleMe(self):        
        plt.title(self.title, fontsize=self.fontsize)
        if self.xlabel is not None:
            plt.xlabel(self.xlabel)
        if self.ylabel is not None:    
            plt.ylabel(self.ylabel)
            
    def showMe(self,mode='show',close=True):
        ''' show me in the given mode '''
        if mode=="show":
            plt.show() 
        else:
            plt.savefig(self.plotdir+self.title+".jpg")
        if close:    
            plt.close()    
            
    def barchart(self,mode='show'):
        ''' barchart based histogram for the given counter '''
        labels, values = zip(*self.counter.items())
        indexes = np.arange(len(labels))
        width = 1
        self.titleMe()
        plt.bar(indexes, values, width)
        plt.xticks(indexes + width * 0.5, labels)
        plt.yticks(np.arange(1,max(values)+1,step=1))
        self.showMe(mode)
        
    def showDebug(self):    
        print("   value  list: ",self.valueList)
        print("counter  items: ",self.counter.items())
        print("counter values: ",self.counter.values())
        print("counter   keys: ",self.counter.keys())
        
    def hist(self,mode="show"):
        ''' create histogram for the given counter '''
        if self.debug:
            self.showDebug()
        self.titleMe()
        # see https://stackoverflow.com/a/2162045/1497139
        plt.hist(self.valueList,bins=len(self.counter.keys()))
        self.showMe(mode)
        pass
        
    
0
0

If it's not convenient to use external packages like numpy, matplotlib, and pandas, you could build a quick-and-dirty ascii bar chart (or really a unit chart) for data in a Counter object with something like the following:

data = ['A','B','A','C','A','A'] 
for category, count in sorted(Counter(data).items()):
    print(f"{category} ┤{''.join(['*'] * count)}")

output:

A ┤****
B ┤*
C ┤*

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