28

I've tried on a few different forums and can't seem to get a straight answer, how can I make this function return the struct? If I try 'return newStudent;' I get the error 'No suitable user-defined conversion from studentType to studentType exists.'

// Input function
studentType newStudent()
{   
    struct studentType
    {
        string studentID;
        string firstName;
        string lastName;
        string subjectName;
        string courseGrade;

        int arrayMarks[4];

        double avgMarks;

    } newStudent;

    cout << "\nPlease enter student information:\n";

    cout << "\nFirst Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.firstName;

    cout << "\nLast Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.lastName;

    cout << "\nStudent ID: ";
    cin >> newStudent.studentID;

    cout << "\nSubject Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.subjectName;

    for (int i = 0; i < NO_OF_TEST; i++)
    {   cout << "\nTest " << i+1 << " mark: ";
        cin >> newStudent.arrayMarks[i];
    }

    newStudent.avgMarks = calculate_avg(newStudent.arrayMarks,NO_OF_TEST );
    newStudent.courseGrade = calculate_grade (newStudent.avgMarks);

}
  • 1
    You seem to have declared two versions of studentType define: one outside the function and one inside the function. You should have only one definition, the one outside the function. – Dietmar Kühl Oct 6 '13 at 3:14
  • Alternatively, you can allocate it on the heap and return a pointer of type studentType. – Mike G Oct 6 '13 at 3:16
36

Here is an edited version of your code which is based on ISO C++ and which works well with G++:

#include <string.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#define NO_OF_TEST 1

struct studentType {
    string studentID;
    string firstName;
    string lastName;
    string subjectName;
    string courseGrade;
    int arrayMarks[4];
    double avgMarks;
};

studentType input() {
    studentType newStudent;
    cout << "\nPlease enter student information:\n";

    cout << "\nFirst Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.firstName;

    cout << "\nLast Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.lastName;

    cout << "\nStudent ID: ";
    cin >> newStudent.studentID;

    cout << "\nSubject Name: ";
    cin >> newStudent.subjectName;

    for (int i = 0; i < NO_OF_TEST; i++) {
        cout << "\nTest " << i+1 << " mark: ";
        cin >> newStudent.arrayMarks[i];
    }

    return newStudent;
}

int main() {
    studentType s;
    s = input();

    cout <<"\n========"<< endl << "Collected the details of "
        << s.firstName << endl;

    return 0;
}
  • Isn't it more efficient to prevent the copy constructor by using a pointer? – Javier Cabero Feb 8 '19 at 10:31
  • @JavierCabero I think there will be a copy-elision automatically... so no copy at all! But if you really want to manage that, you can implement some lvalue move on the struct object. – Sandburg Apr 5 '19 at 14:56
  • Isn't it bad to return a variable that has been allocated on the stack? – Little Helper Mar 17 at 21:22
15

You have a scope problem. Define the struct before the function, not inside it.

7
studentType newStudent() // studentType doesn't exist here
{   
    struct studentType // it only exists within the function
    {
        string studentID;
        string firstName;
        string lastName;
        string subjectName;
        string courseGrade;

        int arrayMarks[4];

        double avgMarks;

    } newStudent;
...

Move it outside the function:

struct studentType
{
    string studentID;
    string firstName;
    string lastName;
    string subjectName;
    string courseGrade;

    int arrayMarks[4];

    double avgMarks;

};

studentType newStudent()
{
    studentType newStudent
    ...
    return newStudent;
}
  • as you are not using new operator to create the structure instance, will it be deleted automatically after you call newStudent() – Ramesh-X Feb 8 '18 at 10:28
0

As pointed out by others, define studentType outside the function. One more thing, even if you do that, do not create a local studentType instance inside the function. The instance is on the function stack and will not be available when you try to return it. One thing you can however do is create studentType dynamically and return the pointer to it outside the function.

  • 3
    If he creates an automatic studentType and returns it by copy, the copy constructor will be called (a default one is created if you don't create one), so he will not have any issues. Declaring the structure inside the function is his primary problem - and there is no need to declare it dynamically at present. – Zac Howland Oct 6 '13 at 4:24
0

You can now (C++14) return a locally-defined (i.e. defined inside the function) as follows:

auto f()
{
    struct S
    {
      int a;
      double b;
    } s;
    s.a = 42;
    s.b = 42.0;
    return s;
}

auto x = f();
a = x.a;
b = x.b;

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