83

I have a data frame, str(data) to show more about my data frame the result is the following:

> str(data)
'data.frame':   153 obs. of  6 variables:
$ Ozone  : int  41 36 12 18 NA 28 23 19 8 NA ...
$ Solar.R: int  190 118 149 313 NA NA 299 99 19 194 ...
$ Wind   : num  7.4 8 12.6 11.5 14.3 14.9 8.6 13.8 20.1 8.6 ...
$ Temp   : int  67 72 74 62 56 66 65 59 61 69 ...
$ Month  : int  5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ...
$ Day    : int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...

However, for example, when I want to subset the amounts of Ozone above 14 I use the following code which gives me an error:

>  data[data$Ozone > 14 ]

Error in [.data.frame(data, data$Ozone > 14) : undefined columns selected

3
  • 13
    you're missing a comma. The error is telling you that you did not indicate which columns to include in your subset. Oct 6, 2013 at 5:52
  • 1
    In other words, remember data frame references need row and column identifiers. You can select only one column or all columns, but you need to indicate what you want. Feb 14, 2015 at 16:14
  • 6
    I'm working on the same assignment, so I know this is homework. Weak sauce. Jul 11, 2015 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

162

You want rows where that condition is true so you need a comma:

data[data$Ozone > 14, ]
5
  • 19
    Why... this syntax makes no sense to me
    – Reinderien
    May 11, 2015 at 4:56
  • 3
    @Reinderien It's a common way of indexing arrays. Check out the old school R documentation, which is actually really good at teaching data structures. May 12, 2015 at 11:41
  • 2
    I get everything but the comma.
    – Reinderien
    May 12, 2015 at 14:00
  • 12
    dat[ 1, 2 ] gives you the entry in the first row, second column. dat[ 1, ] gives you every entry in the first row. dat[ 1:5, ] gives you every column of rows 1-5. May 14, 2015 at 1:28
  • 6
    It's 153 x 6, that's two dimensions. May 15, 2015 at 2:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.