78

I have a data frame, str(data) to show more about my data frame the result is the following:

> str(data)
'data.frame':   153 obs. of  6 variables:
$ Ozone  : int  41 36 12 18 NA 28 23 19 8 NA ...
$ Solar.R: int  190 118 149 313 NA NA 299 99 19 194 ...
$ Wind   : num  7.4 8 12.6 11.5 14.3 14.9 8.6 13.8 20.1 8.6 ...
$ Temp   : int  67 72 74 62 56 66 65 59 61 69 ...
$ Month  : int  5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ...
$ Day    : int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...

However, for example, when I want to subset the amounts of Ozone above 14 I use the following code which gives me an error:

>  data[data$Ozone > 14 ]

Error in [.data.frame(data, data$Ozone > 14) : undefined columns selected

  • 11
    you're missing a comma. The error is telling you that you did not indicate which columns to include in your subset. – Ricardo Saporta Oct 6 '13 at 5:52
  • 1
    In other words, remember data frame references need row and column identifiers. You can select only one column or all columns, but you need to indicate what you want. – Scott C Wilson Feb 14 '15 at 16:14
  • 6
    I'm working on the same assignment, so I know this is homework. Weak sauce. – Brian MacKay Jul 11 '15 at 19:48
148

You want rows where that condition is true so you need a comma:

data[data$Ozone > 14, ]
| improve this answer | |
  • 18
    Why... this syntax makes no sense to me – Reinderien May 11 '15 at 4:56
  • 3
    @Reinderien It's a common way of indexing arrays. Check out the old school R documentation, which is actually really good at teaching data structures. – Ari B. Friedman May 12 '15 at 11:41
  • 2
    I get everything but the comma. – Reinderien May 12 '15 at 14:00
  • 10
    dat[ 1, 2 ] gives you the entry in the first row, second column. dat[ 1, ] gives you every entry in the first row. dat[ 1:5, ] gives you every column of rows 1-5. – Ari B. Friedman May 14 '15 at 1:28
  • 6
    It's 153 x 6, that's two dimensions. – Ari B. Friedman May 15 '15 at 2:47

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