I am completely new to writing a Java Servlet, and am struggling to get a simple HelloWorld example to work properly.

The HelloWorld.java class is:

package crunch;

import java.io.*;
import javax.servlet.*;
import javax.servlet.http.*;

public class HelloWorld extends HttpServlet {
  public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request,
                    HttpServletResponse response)
      throws ServletException, IOException {
    PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();
    out.println("Hello World");
  }
}

I am running Tomcat v7.0, and have already read similar questions, with responses referring to changing the invoker servlet-mapping section in web.xml, this section actually doesn't exist in mine, and when I added it the same problem still occurred.

  • 1
    This must be a configuration problem. Please provide your web.xml and url you're trying to access. – Bart Oct 6 '13 at 11:12
  • can you please show your web.xml and where you are calling ? – ꜱᴜʀᴇꜱʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Oct 6 '13 at 11:12
  • what version of Java EE you are using?! – user2511414 Oct 6 '13 at 11:13
  • Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/11731377 – BalusC Apr 24 '16 at 12:53
up vote 21 down vote accepted

try this (if the Java EE V6)

package crunch;
import java.io.*;
import javax.servlet.*;
import javax.servlet.http.*;
@WebServlet(name="hello",urlPatterns={"/hello"})
public class HelloWorld extends HttpServlet {
  public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request,
                    HttpServletResponse response)
      throws ServletException, IOException {
    PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();
    out.println("Hello World");
  }
}

now reach the servlet by http://127.0.0.1:8080/yourapp/hello

where 8080 is default tomcat port, and yourapp is the context name of your applciation

You definitely need to map your servlet onto some URL. If you use Java EE 6 (that means at least Servlet API 3.0) then you can annotate your servlet like

@WebServlet(name="helloServlet", urlPatterns={"/hello"})
public class HelloWorld extends HttpServlet {
     //rest of the class

Then you can just go to the localhost:8080/yourApp/hello and the value should be displayed. In case you can't use Servlet 3.0 API than you need to register this servlet into web.xml file like

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>helloServlet</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>crunch.HelloWorld</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>helloServlet</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/hello</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

Writing Java servlets is easy if you use Java EE 7

@WebServlet("/hello-world")
public class HelloWorld extends HttpServlet {
  @Override
  public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, 
                  HttpServletResponse response) {
   response.setContentType("text/html");
   PrintWriter out = response.getWriter();
   out.println("Hello World");
   out.flush();
  }
}

Since servlet 3.0

The good news is the deployment descriptor is no longer required!

Read the tutorial for Java Servlets.

  • Hi. I'm using JRE7 and Eclipse is not recognizing @WebServlet. How can I solve this? I'm with this same issue! – Totalys May 13 '14 at 3:00
  • @Totalys are you sure the compiler is set to JDK7, and also the JRE? (I mean, in the settings of Eclipse) – Yair Zaslavsky Mar 11 '15 at 5:37
  • The link to the Servlet tutorial changes to http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/7/tutorial/servlets.htm#BNAFD – Campfire Apr 13 '17 at 12:26
  • @Campfire Thanks, updated. – Roman C Apr 13 '17 at 12:36

this is may be due to the thing that you have created your .jsp or the .html file in the WEB-INF instead of the WebContent folder.

Solution: Just replace the files that are there in the WEB-INF folder to the Webcontent folder and try executing the same - You will get the appropriate output

For those stuck with "The requested resource is not available" in Java EE 7 and dynamic web module 3.x, maybe this could help: the "Create Servlet" wizard in Eclipse (tested in Mars) doesn't create the @Path annotation for the servlet class, but I had to include it to access successfuly to the public methods exposed.

You have to user ../../projectName/Filename.jsp in your action attr. or href

../ = contains current folder simple(demo.project.filename.jsp)

Servlet can only be called with 1 slash forward to your project name..

My problem was in web.xml file. In one <servlet-mapping> there was an error inside <url-pattern>: I forgot to add / before url.

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