33

I have an app that connects to a MYSQL database through the entity framework. It works 100% perfectly, but I would like to add a small piece of code that will test the connection to the database upon app startup.

I had the idea of simply running a tiny command to the database and catching any exceptions, however if there is a problem (eg App.Config missing or Database server down) the app takes a huge amount of time to run this code and then throw the exception (~1 min). I imagine this is due to connection timeouts etc but I have fiddled with such properties to no avail.

Would anyone be able to assist with any ideas as to where to go?

43

Are you just wanting to see if the DB connection is valid. If so take a look at the

using (DatabaseContext dbContext = new DatabaseContext())
{
     dbContext.Database.Exists();
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg696617(v=vs.103).aspx EF5 https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg696617(v=vs.113).aspx for EF6

and for checking if a server machine is up, DB server or web services server , try this:

public PingReply Send( string hostNameOrAddress )

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7hzczzed.aspx

  • 9
    I tested this by taking a db 'offline' in SQL Server and Database.Exists() still returned true. Something to watch out for... – Eric Tarasoff Jun 17 '14 at 23:24
  • 1
    The best way is to use the mysql dll conector and do it manually. If you use migrations it will return false, but the connection is OK! – Danilo Breda Oct 7 '14 at 18:54
  • 1
    This is not working for MS SQL, Exists return true and DBSet.Load give exception at the same time. – Sandor Mar 7 '15 at 15:31
  • 1
    What is the Exception? – Tauseef Mar 24 '15 at 15:03
  • 1
    'I believe the above solution is for an EF version earlier than EF6' Indeed, EF6 was not around when the answer was posted. Thanks for posting details, I shall review and update the answer if required. – Tauseef Jun 27 '16 at 17:29
33

The solution as @Danilo Breda pointed out is to call the DbContext.Database.Connection.Open()

It is tested with EF6.

My implementaion:

    public static bool CheckConnection()
    {
        try
        {
            MyContext.Database.Connection.Open();
            MyContext.Database.Connection.Close();
        }
        catch(SqlException)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
  • I like this solution the most, and yes, you should not use exceptions for flow logic (usually ;-) ) – Xan-Kun Clark-Davis Dec 3 '15 at 22:34
  • I would add this to the Unit Tests. – Bimal Poudel Dec 7 '16 at 15:39
  • I understand that if I want to ensure that the MySQL server is up on each interaction witht the DB, I need to do if (CheckConnection()) {..} for every single action (In order to avoid application errors in case the MySQL server is down). Any idea how to implement this check on more global level? So there would be no need to call and re-call CheckConnection() ? – W.M. Mar 25 '17 at 19:33
  • 1
    @W.M. The best choice for would be to implement connection resiliency, see the following article. codeproject.com/Tips/758469/… – Geovani Martinez Mar 7 '18 at 2:51
10

I use this code for my project:

private bool TestConnectionEF()
        {
            using (var db = new SistemaContext())
            {
                try
                {
                    db.Database.Connection.Open();
                    if (db.Database.Connection.State == ConnectionState.Open)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(@"INFO: ConnectionString: " + db.Database.Connection.ConnectionString 
                            + "\n DataBase: " + db.Database.Connection.Database 
                            + "\n DataSource: " + db.Database.Connection.DataSource 
                            + "\n ServerVersion: " + db.Database.Connection.ServerVersion 
                            + "\n TimeOut: " + db.Database.Connection.ConnectionTimeout);
                        db.Database.Connection.Close();
                        return true;
                    }
                    return false;
                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {
                    throw ex;
                }
            }
        }
  • 1
    Given your use of using block, is the connection.close() necessary? – ComeIn Feb 15 at 12:16
  • @ComeIn If your Context class have a databaseconnectionclose on the dispose method, you can take it off.. i dont know if the ORM do it. For me when i open a connection, i need to closeit.If i dont open, i dont need to close. – Danilo Breda Feb 19 at 21:02
  • EF will close the underlying DBContext. Best not to do this manually unless necessary. see: stackoverflow.com/questions/28067150/… – ComeIn Mar 26 at 1:04
  • @ComeIn EF will close if it opens for me, on my code i open it manually so i need to close it ("If you open a connection manually, EF will NOT close it for you after a database operation is completed.") – Danilo Breda Mar 26 at 21:50
  • Then I guess we circle back to my original question. Do you really need to call Connection.Open() explicitly, and if not then just remove that call. It is the recommended usage, but of course if you want the extra headache of managing DB connections manually then carry on as you are. – ComeIn Mar 27 at 23:43
5

In EntityFramework Core you can simply call: Database.CanConnect();.

(using EF Core 2.2.1)

1

I used the answer from @Sandor and did an extension method to use with EntityFramework Core.

Here's the code:

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using System.Data.Common;

namespace TerminalInventory
{
    public static class ExtensionMethods
    {
        public static bool TestConnection(this DbContext context)
        {
            DbConnection conn = context.Database.GetDbConnection();

            try
            {
                conn.Open();   // Check the database connection

                return true;
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
}

Now you just have to call:

if (!context.TestConnection())
{
    logger.LogInformation("No database connection. Check the connection string in settings.json. {0}", configuration["connectionString"]);

    return;
}
  • 1
    Since you are not inside a using block, shouldn't you close the connection after calling open() to avoid needlessly leaving the connection open? – B12Toaster Sep 1 '18 at 21:49
  • do you need to close the connection? or is it ok to leave it open? – user441365 Jan 8 at 11:31

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