139

I want to use the DateTime.TryParse method to get the datetime value of a string into a Nullable. But when I try this:

DateTime? d;
bool success = DateTime.TryParse("some date text", out (DateTime)d);

the compiler tells me

'out' argument is not classified as a variable

Not sure what I need to do here. I've also tried:

out (DateTime)d.Value 

and that doesn't work either. Any ideas?

9 Answers 9

186

As Jason says, you can create a variable of the right type and pass that. You might want to encapsulate it in your own method:

public static DateTime? TryParse(string text)
{
    DateTime date;
    if (DateTime.TryParse(text, out date))
    {
        return date;
    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}

... or if you like the conditional operator:

public static DateTime? TryParse(string text)
{
    DateTime date;
    return DateTime.TryParse(text, out date) ? date : (DateTime?) null;
}

Or in C# 7:

public static DateTime? TryParse(string text) =>
    DateTime.TryParse(text, out var date) ? date : (DateTime?) null;
6
  • 7
    I probably shouldn't argue with The Skeet, but... you should call your method Parse, since I would expect a method called TryParse to follow the TryParse convention and return a boolean. ;-)
    – Myster
    Apr 12, 2015 at 22:09
  • 1
    @Myster: Well in neither case does it follow the exact existing convention - those used to just Parse would expect it to return DateTime and throw an exception on failure, right? But yes, you can do whatever you want... and in Noda Time, I have named the relevant methods Parse instead.
    – Jon Skeet
    Apr 13, 2015 at 6:01
  • 1
    The else keyword is unnecessary (in your first example) since the end-point of the if block can never be reached. Jan 24, 2017 at 10:25
  • 2
    @JeppeStigNielsen: Yes, it's unnecessary - but it may be stylistically preferable for symmetry. It's just a personal preference (and I'm not consistent, either...)
    – Jon Skeet
    Jan 24, 2017 at 10:31
  • 4
    @Kiquenet: using else makes it clearer that one or the other path will be taken, and both return. I'm against massively nested code, but in this case it's really not a problem IMO.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jun 10, 2017 at 18:12
140
DateTime? d=null;
DateTime d2;
bool success = DateTime.TryParse("some date text", out d2);
if (success) d=d2;

(There might be more elegant solutions, but why don't you simply do something as above?)

5
  • 4
    You're right, I was looking for more of a one-liner to get it done, but I suppose this will do. Don't like creating that temp variable, feels messy. :-/ Seems like this scenario should be better supported. Oct 10, 2008 at 16:39
  • 1
    see Binary Worrier's suggestion to psuedo-inline that into an extension method. Oct 10, 2008 at 16:48
  • 4
    Why are you casting a DateTime to a DateTime? You don't need to recased d2 before passing it into the TryParse. Oct 31, 2008 at 21:48
  • @Slace -- I updated the answer to incorporate your suggestion. May 31, 2010 at 9:27
  • @Jason Kealey I hope this is already introduced in VS2012, otherwise I will have to continue using this good piece of code.
    – Pimenta
    Nov 13, 2012 at 10:50
24

Here is a slightly concised edition of what Jason suggested:

DateTime? d; DateTime dt;
d = DateTime.TryParse(DateTime.Now.ToString(), out dt)? dt : (DateTime?)null;
0
18

You can't because Nullable<DateTime> is a different type to DateTime. You need to write your own function to do it,

public bool TryParse(string text, out Nullable<DateTime> nDate)
{
    DateTime date;
    bool isParsed = DateTime.TryParse(text, out date);
    if (isParsed)
        nDate = new Nullable<DateTime>(date);
    else
        nDate = new Nullable<DateTime>();
    return isParsed;
}

Hope this helps :)

EDIT: Removed the (obviously) improperly tested extension method, because (as Pointed out by some bad hoor) extension methods that attempt to change the "this" parameter will not work with Value Types.

P.S. The Bad Hoor in question is an old friend :)

8
  • Ya dont wanna init the date [as you're using it as an out param] OK, I'll stop being picky! Jan 16, 2009 at 12:55
  • Dont have compiler on me, but as DateTime is a value type, does the extension method def compile? Jan 16, 2009 at 12:59
  • Result doesnt come back unless you make it out -- [TestFixture] public class WhenExtending { [Test] public void TryParseShouldWork() { DateTime? x = null; var res = Externders.TryParse( x, "1/1/1990" ); Assert.IsTrue( res ) Jan 16, 2009 at 14:22
  • ;Assert.That( x != null ); } } fails on the Assert.That, i.e., the result doesnt get modified as DateTime is a value type (which is always a nice weed-out question on phone screens :D) Jan 16, 2009 at 14:23
  • (obv the first (non-extension) one will work, but it should be out, not ref - and you should be nulling the result if it fails to fit in with TryXXX APIs in general - Pretty sure FDG mentions that. Man, am I picky! Jan 16, 2009 at 14:25
8

This is the one liner you're looking for:

DateTime? d = DateTime.TryParse("some date text", out DateTime dt) ? dt : null;

If you want to make it a proper TryParse pseudo-extension method, you can do this:

public static bool TryParse(string text, out DateTime? dt)
{
    if (DateTime.TryParse(text, out DateTime date))
    {
        dt = date;
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        dt = null;
        return false;
    }
}
4
  • @robnick How is that different than what i said?
    – cpcolella
    Dec 13, 2019 at 3:00
  • 2
    Ignore my previous comment (I have upvoted your solution!), for latest C# I needed to cast the null: DateTime? d = DateTime.TryParse(blah, out DateTime dt) ? dt : (DateTime?)null;
    – robnick
    Dec 14, 2019 at 4:09
  • Ran into the same issue; I believe the null has to be cast as a DateTime? in the one-liner, yes? Jul 12, 2022 at 17:43
  • Heads up: this (and pretty much all other answers) will overwrite any existing values in d with null if it fails, which may be an unintended side effect (in my case b/c parsing a bunch of possible date fields in FHIR). Using Cpcolella's one liner above, but in if statement form, would prevent this. if (DateTime.TryParse("some date text", out DateTime dt) { d = dt }
    – mochsner
    Aug 4, 2022 at 11:13
4

What about creating an extension method?

public static class NullableExtensions
{
    public static bool TryParse(this DateTime? dateTime, string dateString, out DateTime? result)
    {
        DateTime tempDate;
        if(! DateTime.TryParse(dateString,out tempDate))
        {
            result = null;
            return false;
        }

        result = tempDate;
        return true;

    }
}
8
  • 2
    What is that first parameter, dateTime, for? It is never used. Oct 21, 2012 at 6:07
  • 1
    @mikez - that's how how extension methods work, it's used by the compiler to know that it should be an extension method. Feb 11, 2013 at 19:56
  • 3
    @MystereMan I know what an extension method is. A more appropriate signature for an extension method would be DateTime? TryParse(this string dateString). This implementation is just bizarre. Feb 11, 2013 at 20:07
  • 3
    @mikez - then why did you ask what it was for? Why pollute the string namespace when you only need it for datetime? The purpose is to provide an analog to DateTime.TryParse that is DateTime?.TryParse Feb 11, 2013 at 20:18
  • 1
    @ErikFunkenbusch This extension method will not allow a call syntax like (DateTime?).TryParse( ... ) or Nullable<DateTime>.TryParse( ... ). So mike z is right, this is a silly signature for the method. Jan 24, 2017 at 10:30
1

I don't see why Microsoft didn't handle this. A smart little utility method to deal with this (I had the issue with int, but replacing int with DateTime will be the same effect, could be.....

    public static bool NullableValueTryParse(string text, out int? nInt)
    {
        int value;
        if (int.TryParse(text, out value))
        {
            nInt = value;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            nInt = null;
            return false;
        }
    }
0
1

Here's a single line solution:

DateTime? d = DateTime.TryParse("text", out DateTime parseDate) ? parseDate : (DateTime?)null;
1
  • 5
    so...you just copied my answer 4 months later?
    – cpcolella
    Apr 14, 2021 at 22:09
-3

Alternatively, if you are not concerned with the possible exception raised, you could change TryParse for Parse:

DateTime? d = DateTime.Parse("some valid text");

Although there won't be a boolean indicating success either, it could be practical in some situations where you know that the input text will always be valid.

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