11

I need a function or a regular expression to validate strings which contain alpha characters (including French ones), minus sign (-), dot (.) and space (excluding everything else)

Thanks

21
/^[a-zàâçéèêëîïôûùüÿñæœ .-]*$/i

Use of /i for case-insensitivity to make things simpler. If you don't want to allow empty strings, change * to +.

  • 3
    Strictly speaking ñ is not french, but the OP did not explicitely exclude non-french characters. – mouviciel Dec 17 '09 at 14:36
  • French doesn't use some of the characters the regular expression is trying to match, and the regular expression is not generic enough if it wants to match all those characters that are used in languages like French. – kiamlaluno Dec 17 '09 at 14:39
  • 1
    @kiamluno, except for ñ french uses all other mentioned characters, some in only few words, like "où" (where) or "L'Haÿ-les-Roses" (a city near Paris) – mouviciel Dec 17 '09 at 15:08
  • 3
    or "Je suis un Piñata" – nickf Dec 17 '09 at 23:57
5

Try:

/^[\p{L}-. ]*$/u

This says:

^         Start of the string
[ ... ]*  Zero or more of the following:
  \p{L}     Unicode letter characters
  -         dashes
  .         periods
            spaces
$         End of the string
/u        Enable Unicode mode in PHP
  • Can u place email regex which accepts unicodes. One upper case, one lower case and one digit. – harshit2811 Mar 21 '14 at 13:20
5

Simplified solution:

/^[a-zA-ZÀ-ÿ-. ]*$/

Explanation:

^ Start of the string [ ... ]* Zero or more of the following: a-z lowercase alphabets A-Z Uppercase alphabets À-ÿ Accepts lowercase and uppercase characters including letters with an umlaut - dashes . periods spaces $ End of the string

  • I think À-ÿ is wrong. Shouldn't it be À-Ÿ (example)? – displayname Aug 29 at 9:53
1

[\w .-] should suffice, but you'll need to have \w consider the locale and/or put it into Unicode mode, so \w matches what Unicode defines as alpha-numeric characters. How to do that in PHP is probably just a Google away.

  • \w is actually better than /[A-Za-z]/u nice..... – Pragati Sureka Dec 17 '09 at 14:48
1

The character class I've been using is the following:

[\wÀ-Üà-øoù-ÿŒœ]. This covers a slightly larger character set than only French, but excludes a large portion of Eastern European and Scandinavian diacriticals and letters that are not relevant to French. I find this a decent compromise between brevity and exclusivity.

To match/validate complete sentences, I use this expression: [\w\s.,!?:;&#%’'"()«»À-Üà-øoù-ÿŒœ], which includes punctuation and French style quotation marks.

0

This line of regex pass throug all of cirano de bergerac french text: (you will need to remove markup language characters http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1256/1256-8.txt

^([0-9A-Za-z\u00C0-\u017F\ ,.\;'\-()\s\:\!\?\"])+
  • You're escaping a bunch of stuff that don't need to be escaped within a character class – Tom Auger Feb 22 at 14:40
-1

This might suit:

/^[ a-zA-Z\xBF-\xFF\.-]+$/

It lets a few extra chars in, like ÷, but it handles quite a few of the accented characters.

  • woo! -1 and accepted! – nickf Dec 17 '09 at 23:56
-1

/[A-Za-z-\.\s]/u should work.. /u switch is for UTF-8 encoding

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