Say, I have a script that gets called with this line:

./myscript -vfd ./foo/bar/someFile -o /fizz/someOtherFile

or this one:

./myscript -v -f -d -o /fizz/someOtherFile ./foo/bar/someFile 

What's the accepted way of parsing this such that in each case (or some combination of the two) $v, $f, and $d will all be set to true and $outFile will be equal to /fizz/someOtherFile ?

  • For zsh-users there's a great builtin called zparseopts which can do: zparseopts -D -E -M -- d=debug -debug=d And have both -d and --debug in the $debug array echo $+debug[1] will return 0 or 1 if one of those are used. Ref: zsh.org/mla/users/2011/msg00350.html – dezza Aug 2 '16 at 2:13

29 Answers 29

up vote 1996 down vote accepted

Method #1: Using bash without getopt[s]

Two common ways to pass key-value-pair arguments are:

Bash Space-Separated (e.g., --option argument) (without getopt[s])

Usage ./myscript.sh -e conf -s /etc -l /usr/lib /etc/hosts

#!/bin/bash

POSITIONAL=()
while [[ $# -gt 0 ]]
do
key="$1"

case $key in
    -e|--extension)
    EXTENSION="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    -s|--searchpath)
    SEARCHPATH="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    -l|--lib)
    LIBPATH="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift # past argument
    ;;
    *)    # unknown option
    POSITIONAL+=("$1") # save it in an array for later
    shift # past argument
    ;;
esac
done
set -- "${POSITIONAL[@]}" # restore positional parameters

echo FILE EXTENSION  = "${EXTENSION}"
echo SEARCH PATH     = "${SEARCHPATH}"
echo LIBRARY PATH    = "${LIBPATH}"
echo DEFAULT         = "${DEFAULT}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 "$1"
fi

Bash Equals-Separated (e.g., --option=argument) (without getopt[s])

Usage ./myscript.sh -e=conf -s=/etc -l=/usr/lib /etc/hosts

#!/bin/bash

for i in "$@"
do
case $i in
    -e=*|--extension=*)
    EXTENSION="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    LIBPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift # past argument with no value
    ;;
    *)
          # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo "FILE EXTENSION  = ${EXTENSION}"
echo "SEARCH PATH     = ${SEARCHPATH}"
echo "LIBRARY PATH    = ${LIBPATH}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 $1
fi

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

Method #2: Using bash with getopt[s]

from: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035#getopts

getopt(1) limitations (older, relatively-recent getopt versions):

  • can't handle arguments that are empty strings
  • can't handle arguments with embedded whitespace

More recent getopt versions don't have these limitations.

Additionally, the POSIX shell (and others) offer getopts which doesn't have these limitations. Here is a simplistic getopts example:

#!/bin/sh

# A POSIX variable
OPTIND=1         # Reset in case getopts has been used previously in the shell.

# Initialize our own variables:
output_file=""
verbose=0

while getopts "h?vf:" opt; do
    case "$opt" in
    h|\?)
        show_help
        exit 0
        ;;
    v)  verbose=1
        ;;
    f)  output_file=$OPTARG
        ;;
    esac
done

shift $((OPTIND-1))

[ "${1:-}" = "--" ] && shift

echo "verbose=$verbose, output_file='$output_file', Leftovers: $@"

# End of file

The advantages of getopts are:

  1. It's more portable, and will work in other shells like dash.
  2. It can handle multiple single options like -vf filename in the typical Unix way, automatically.

The disadvantage of getopts is that it can only handle short options (-h, not --help) without additional code.

There is a getopts tutorial which explains what all of the syntax and variables mean. In bash, there is also help getopts, which might be informative.

  • 31
    Is this really true? According to Wikipedia there's a newer GNU enhanced version of getopt which includes all the functionality of getopts and then some. man getopt on Ubuntu 13.04 outputs getopt - parse command options (enhanced) as the name, so I presume this enhanced version is standard now. – Livven Jun 6 '13 at 21:19
  • 35
    That something is a certain way on your system is a very weak premise to base asumptions of "being standard" on. – szablica Jul 17 '13 at 15:23
  • 6
    @Livven, that getopt is not a GNU utility, it's part of util-linux. – Stephane Chazelas Aug 20 '14 at 19:55
  • 3
    If you use -gt 0, remove your shift after the esac, augment all the shift by 1 and add this case: *) break;; you can handle non optionnal arguments. Ex: pastebin.com/6DJ57HTc – Nicolas Mongrain-Lacombe Jun 19 '16 at 21:22
  • 2
    You do not echo –default. In the first example, I notice that if –default is the last argument, it is not processed (considered as non-opt), unless while [[ $# -gt 1 ]] is set as while [[ $# -gt 0 ]] – kolydart Jul 10 '17 at 8:11

No answer mentions enhanced getopt. And the top-voted answer is misleading: It ignores -⁠vfd style short options (requested by the OP), options after positional arguments (also requested by the OP) and it ignores parsing-errors. Instead:

  • Use enhanced getopt from util-linux or formerly GNU glibc.1
  • It works with getopt_long() the C function of GNU glibc.
  • Has all useful distinguishing features (the others don’t have them):
    • handles spaces, quoting characters and even binary in arguments2
    • it can handle options at the end: script.sh -o outFile file1 file2 -v
    • allows =-style long options: script.sh --outfile=fileOut --infile fileIn
  • Is so old already3 that no GNU system is missing this (e.g. any Linux has it).
  • You can test for its existence with: getopt --test → return value 4.
  • Other getopt or shell-builtin getopts are of limited use.

The following calls

myscript -vfd ./foo/bar/someFile -o /fizz/someOtherFile
myscript -v -f -d -o/fizz/someOtherFile -- ./foo/bar/someFile
myscript --verbose --force --debug ./foo/bar/someFile -o/fizz/someOtherFile
myscript --output=/fizz/someOtherFile ./foo/bar/someFile -vfd
myscript ./foo/bar/someFile -df -v --output /fizz/someOtherFile

all return

verbose: y, force: y, debug: y, in: ./foo/bar/someFile, out: /fizz/someOtherFile

with the following myscript

#!/bin/bash
# saner programming env: these switches turn some bugs into errors
set -o errexit -o pipefail -o noclobber -o nounset

! getopt --test > /dev/null 
if [[ ${PIPESTATUS[0]} -ne 4 ]]; then
    echo "I’m sorry, `getopt --test` failed in this environment."
    exit 1
fi

OPTIONS=dfo:v
LONGOPTS=debug,force,output:,verbose

# -use ! and PIPESTATUS to get exit code with errexit set
# -temporarily store output to be able to check for errors
# -activate quoting/enhanced mode (e.g. by writing out “--options”)
# -pass arguments only via   -- "$@"   to separate them correctly
! PARSED=$(getopt --options=$OPTIONS --longoptions=$LONGOPTS --name "$0" -- "$@")
if [[ ${PIPESTATUS[0]} -ne 0 ]]; then
    # e.g. return value is 1
    #  then getopt has complained about wrong arguments to stdout
    exit 2
fi
# read getopt’s output this way to handle the quoting right:
eval set -- "$PARSED"

d=n f=n v=n outFile=-
# now enjoy the options in order and nicely split until we see --
while true; do
    case "$1" in
        -d|--debug)
            d=y
            shift
            ;;
        -f|--force)
            f=y
            shift
            ;;
        -v|--verbose)
            v=y
            shift
            ;;
        -o|--output)
            outFile="$2"
            shift 2
            ;;
        --)
            shift
            break
            ;;
        *)
            echo "Programming error"
            exit 3
            ;;
    esac
done

# handle non-option arguments
if [[ $# -ne 1 ]]; then
    echo "$0: A single input file is required."
    exit 4
fi

echo "verbose: $v, force: $f, debug: $d, in: $1, out: $outFile"

1 enhanced getopt is available on most “bash-systems”, including Cygwin; on OS X try brew install gnu-getopt or sudo port install getopt
2 the POSIX exec() conventions have no reliable way to pass binary NULL in command line arguments; those bytes prematurely end the argument
3 first version released in 1997 or before (I only tracked it back to 1997)

  • 3
    Thanks for this. Just confirmed from the feature table at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Getopts, if you need support for long options, and you're not on Solaris, getopt is the way to go. – johncip Jan 12 '17 at 2:00
  • 2
    I believe that the only caveat with getopt is that it cannot be used conveniently in wrapper scripts where one might have few options specific to the wrapper script, and then pass the non-wrapper-script options to the wrapped executable, intact. Let's say I have a grep wrapper called mygrep and I have an option --foo specific to mygrep, then I cannot do mygrep --foo -A 2, and have the -A 2 passed automatically to grep; I need to do mygrep --foo -- -A 2. Here is my implementation on top of your solution. – Kaushal Modi Apr 27 '17 at 14:02
  • 1
    @bobpaul Your statement about util-linux is wrong and misleading as well: the package is marked “essential” on Ubuntu/Debian. As such, it is always installed. – Which distros are you talking about (where you say it needs to be installed on purpose)? – Robert Siemer Mar 21 at 9:16
  • 1
    @Jason, getopt will fail 'for you'. No need to check that yourself. – Robert Siemer May 4 at 8:22
  • 1
    @AlexYursha @Marcos @bobpaul The improved script uses errexit aka set -e rather elegant now. – Robert Siemer Jul 10 at 22:08

from : digitalpeer.com with minor modifications

Usage myscript.sh -p=my_prefix -s=dirname -l=libname

#!/bin/bash
for i in "$@"
do
case $i in
    -p=*|--prefix=*)
    PREFIX="${i#*=}"

    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    DIR="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    ;;
    *)
            # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo PREFIX = ${PREFIX}
echo SEARCH PATH = ${SEARCHPATH}
echo DIRS = ${DIR}
echo DEFAULT = ${DEFAULT}

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

  • 3
    Neat! Though this won't work for space-separated arguments à la mount -t tempfs .... One can probably fix this via something like while [ $# -ge 1 ]; do param=$1; shift; case $param in; -p) prefix=$1; shift;; etc – Tobias Kienzler Nov 12 '13 at 12:48
  • 3
    This can’t handle -vfd style combined short options. – Robert Siemer Mar 19 '16 at 15:23
  • 1
    link is broken! – bekur Dec 19 '17 at 23:27

getopt()/getopts() is a good option. Stolen from here:

The simple use of "getopt" is shown in this mini-script:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Before getopt"
for i
do
  echo $i
done
args=`getopt abc:d $*`
set -- $args
echo "After getopt"
for i
do
  echo "-->$i"
done

What we have said is that any of -a, -b, -c or -d will be allowed, but that -c is followed by an argument (the "c:" says that).

If we call this "g" and try it out:

bash-2.05a$ ./g -abc foo
Before getopt
-abc
foo
After getopt
-->-a
-->-b
-->-c
-->foo
-->--

We start with two arguments, and "getopt" breaks apart the options and puts each in its own argument. It also added "--".

  • 3
    Using $* is broken usage of getopt. (It hoses arguments with spaces.) See my answer for proper usage. – Robert Siemer Apr 16 '16 at 14:37
  • Why would you want to make it more complicated? – SDsolar Aug 10 '17 at 14:07
  • @Matt J, the first part of the script (for i) would be able to handle arguments with spaces in them if you use "$i" instead of $i. The getopts does not seem to be able to handle arguments with spaces. What would be the advantage of using getopt over the for i loop? – thebunnyrules Jun 1 at 1:57

At the risk of adding another example to ignore, here's my scheme.

  • handles -n arg and --name=arg
  • allows arguments at the end
  • shows sane errors if anything is misspelled
  • compatible, doesn't use bashisms
  • readable, doesn't require maintaining state in a loop

Hope it's useful to someone.

while [ "$#" -gt 0 ]; do
  case "$1" in
    -n) name="$2"; shift 2;;
    -p) pidfile="$2"; shift 2;;
    -l) logfile="$2"; shift 2;;

    --name=*) name="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --pidfile=*) pidfile="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --logfile=*) logfile="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --name|--pidfile|--logfile) echo "$1 requires an argument" >&2; exit 1;;

    -*) echo "unknown option: $1" >&2; exit 1;;
    *) handle_argument "$1"; shift 1;;
  esac
done
  • 1
    What is the "handle_argument" function? – rhombidodecahedron Sep 11 '15 at 8:40
  • 4
    Sorry for the delay. In my script, the handle_argument function receives all the non-option arguments. You can replace that line with whatever you'd like, maybe *) die "unrecognized argument: $1" or collect the args into a variable *) args+="$1"; shift 1;;. – bronson Oct 8 '15 at 20:41
  • Amazing! I've tested a couple of answers, but this is the only one that worked for all cases, including many positional parameters (both before and after flags) – Guilherme Garnier Apr 13 at 16:10

More succinct way

script.sh

#!/bin/bash

while [[ "$#" > 0 ]]; do case $1 in
  -d|--deploy) deploy="$2"; shift;;
  -u|--uglify) uglify=1;;
  *) echo "Unknown parameter passed: $1"; exit 1;;
esac; shift; done

echo "Should deploy? $deploy"
echo "Should uglify? $uglify"

Usage:

./script.sh -d dev -u

# OR:

./script.sh --deploy dev --uglify

I'm about 4 years late to this question, but want to give back. I used the earlier answers as a starting point to tidy up my old adhoc param parsing. I then refactored out the following template code. It handles both long and short params, using = or space separated arguments, as well as multiple short params grouped together. Finally it re-inserts any non-param arguments back into the $1,$2.. variables. I hope it's useful.

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# NOTICE: Uncomment if your script depends on bashisms.
#if [ -z "$BASH_VERSION" ]; then bash $0 $@ ; exit $? ; fi

echo "Before"
for i ; do echo - $i ; done


# Code template for parsing command line parameters using only portable shell
# code, while handling both long and short params, handling '-f file' and
# '-f=file' style param data and also capturing non-parameters to be inserted
# back into the shell positional parameters.

while [ -n "$1" ]; do
        # Copy so we can modify it (can't modify $1)
        OPT="$1"
        # Detect argument termination
        if [ x"$OPT" = x"--" ]; then
                shift
                for OPT ; do
                        REMAINS="$REMAINS \"$OPT\""
                done
                break
        fi
        # Parse current opt
        while [ x"$OPT" != x"-" ] ; do
                case "$OPT" in
                        # Handle --flag=value opts like this
                        -c=* | --config=* )
                                CONFIGFILE="${OPT#*=}"
                                shift
                                ;;
                        # and --flag value opts like this
                        -c* | --config )
                                CONFIGFILE="$2"
                                shift
                                ;;
                        -f* | --force )
                                FORCE=true
                                ;;
                        -r* | --retry )
                                RETRY=true
                                ;;
                        # Anything unknown is recorded for later
                        * )
                                REMAINS="$REMAINS \"$OPT\""
                                break
                                ;;
                esac
                # Check for multiple short options
                # NOTICE: be sure to update this pattern to match valid options
                NEXTOPT="${OPT#-[cfr]}" # try removing single short opt
                if [ x"$OPT" != x"$NEXTOPT" ] ; then
                        OPT="-$NEXTOPT"  # multiple short opts, keep going
                else
                        break  # long form, exit inner loop
                fi
        done
        # Done with that param. move to next
        shift
done
# Set the non-parameters back into the positional parameters ($1 $2 ..)
eval set -- $REMAINS


echo -e "After: \n configfile='$CONFIGFILE' \n force='$FORCE' \n retry='$RETRY' \n remains='$REMAINS'"
for i ; do echo - $i ; done
  • This code can’t handle options with arguments like this: -c1. And the use of = to separate short options from their arguments is unusual... – Robert Siemer Dec 6 '15 at 13:47
  • 2
    I ran into two problems with this useful chunk of code: 1) the "shift" in the case of "-c=foo" ends up eating the next parameter; and 2) 'c' should not be included in the "[cfr]" pattern for combinable short options. – sfnd Jun 6 '16 at 19:28

My answer is largely based on the answer by Bruno Bronosky, but I sort of mashed his two pure bash implementations into one that I use pretty frequently.

# As long as there is at least one more argument, keep looping
while [[ $# -gt 0 ]]; do
    key="$1"
    case "$key" in
        # This is a flag type option. Will catch either -f or --foo
        -f|--foo)
        FOO=1
        ;;
        # Also a flag type option. Will catch either -b or --bar
        -b|--bar)
        BAR=1
        ;;
        # This is an arg value type option. Will catch -o value or --output-file value
        -o|--output-file)
        shift # past the key and to the value
        OUTPUTFILE="$1"
        ;;
        # This is an arg=value type option. Will catch -o=value or --output-file=value
        -o=*|--output-file=*)
        # No need to shift here since the value is part of the same string
        OUTPUTFILE="${key#*=}"
        ;;
        *)
        # Do whatever you want with extra options
        echo "Unknown option '$key'"
        ;;
    esac
    # Shift after checking all the cases to get the next option
    shift
done

This allows you to have both space separated options/values, as well as equal defined values.

So you could run your script using:

./myscript --foo -b -o /fizz/file.txt

as well as:

./myscript -f --bar -o=/fizz/file.txt

and both should have the same end result.

PROS:

  • Allows for both -arg=value and -arg value

  • Works with any arg name that you can use in bash

    • Meaning -a or -arg or --arg or -a-r-g or whatever
  • Pure bash. No need to learn/use getopt or getopts

CONS:

  • Can't combine args

    • Meaning no -abc. You must do -a -b -c

These are the only pros/cons I can think of off the top of my head

I have found the matter to write portable parsing in scripts so frustrating that I have written Argbash - a FOSS code generator that can generate the arguments-parsing code for your script plus it has some nice features:

https://argbash.io

  • Thanks for writing argbash, I just used it and found it works well. I mostly went for argbash because it's a code generator supporting the older bash 3.x found on OS X 10.11 El Capitan. The only downside is that the code-generator approach means quite a lot of code in your main script, compared to calling a module. – RichVel Aug 18 '16 at 5:34
  • You can actually use Argbash in a way that it produces tailor-made parsing library just for you that you can have included in your script or you can have it in a separate file and just source it. I have added an example to demonstrate that and I have made it more explicit in the documentation, too. – bubla Aug 23 '16 at 20:40
  • Good to know. That example is interesting but still not really clear - maybe you can change name of the generated script to 'parse_lib.sh' or similar and show where the main script calls it (like in the wrapping script section which is more complex use case). – RichVel Aug 24 '16 at 5:47
  • The issues were addressed in recent version of argbash: Documentation has been improved, a quickstart argbash-init script has been introduced and you can even use argbash online at argbash.io/generate – bubla Dec 2 '16 at 20:12

I think this one is simple enough to use:

#!/bin/bash
#

readopt='getopts $opts opt;rc=$?;[ $rc$opt == 0? ]&&exit 1;[ $rc == 0 ]||{ shift $[OPTIND-1];false; }'

opts=vfdo:

# Enumerating options
while eval $readopt
do
    echo OPT:$opt ${OPTARG+OPTARG:$OPTARG}
done

# Enumerating arguments
for arg
do
    echo ARG:$arg
done

Invocation example:

./myscript -v -do /fizz/someOtherFile -f ./foo/bar/someFile
OPT:v 
OPT:d 
OPT:o OPTARG:/fizz/someOtherFile
OPT:f 
ARG:./foo/bar/someFile
  • 1
    I read all and this one is my preferred one. I don't like to use -a=1 as argc style. I prefer to put first the main option -options and later the special ones with single spacing -o option. Im looking for the simplest-vs-better way to read argvs. – erm3nda May 20 '15 at 22:50
  • It's working really well but if you pass an argument to a non a: option all the following options would be taken as arguments. You can check this line ./myscript -v -d fail -o /fizz/someOtherFile -f ./foo/bar/someFile with your own script. -d option is not set as d: – erm3nda May 20 '15 at 23:25

Expanding on the excellent answer by @guneysus, here is a tweak that lets user use whichever syntax they prefer, eg

command -x=myfilename.ext --another_switch 

vs

command -x myfilename.ext --another_switch

That is to say the equals can be replaced with whitespace.

This "fuzzy interpretation" might not be to your liking, but if you are making scripts that are interchangeable with other utilities (as is the case with mine, which must work with ffmpeg), the flexibility is useful.

STD_IN=0

prefix=""
key=""
value=""
for keyValue in "$@"
do
  case "${prefix}${keyValue}" in
    -i=*|--input_filename=*)  key="-i";     value="${keyValue#*=}";; 
    -ss=*|--seek_from=*)      key="-ss";    value="${keyValue#*=}";;
    -t=*|--play_seconds=*)    key="-t";     value="${keyValue#*=}";;
    -|--stdin)                key="-";      value=1;;
    *)                                      value=$keyValue;;
  esac
  case $key in
    -i) MOVIE=$(resolveMovie "${value}");  prefix=""; key="";;
    -ss) SEEK_FROM="${value}";          prefix=""; key="";;
    -t)  PLAY_SECONDS="${value}";           prefix=""; key="";;
    -)   STD_IN=${value};                   prefix=""; key="";; 
    *)   prefix="${keyValue}=";;
  esac
done

getopts works great if #1 you have it installed and #2 you intend to run it on the same platform. OSX and Linux (for example) behave differently in this respect.

Here is a (non getopts) solution that supports equals, non-equals, and boolean flags. For example you could run your script in this way:

./script --arg1=value1 --arg2 value2 --shouldClean

# parse the arguments.
COUNTER=0
ARGS=("$@")
while [ $COUNTER -lt $# ]
do
    arg=${ARGS[$COUNTER]}
    let COUNTER=COUNTER+1
    nextArg=${ARGS[$COUNTER]}

    if [[ $skipNext -eq 1 ]]; then
        echo "Skipping"
        skipNext=0
        continue
    fi

    argKey=""
    argVal=""
    if [[ "$arg" =~ ^\- ]]; then
        # if the format is: -key=value
        if [[ "$arg" =~ \= ]]; then
            argVal=$(echo "$arg" | cut -d'=' -f2)
            argKey=$(echo "$arg" | cut -d'=' -f1)
            skipNext=0

        # if the format is: -key value
        elif [[ ! "$nextArg" =~ ^\- ]]; then
            argKey="$arg"
            argVal="$nextArg"
            skipNext=1

        # if the format is: -key (a boolean flag)
        elif [[ "$nextArg" =~ ^\- ]] || [[ -z "$nextArg" ]]; then
            argKey="$arg"
            argVal=""
            skipNext=0
        fi
    # if the format has not flag, just a value.
    else
        argKey=""
        argVal="$arg"
        skipNext=0
    fi

    case "$argKey" in 
        --source-scmurl)
            SOURCE_URL="$argVal"
        ;;
        --dest-scmurl)
            DEST_URL="$argVal"
        ;;
        --version-num)
            VERSION_NUM="$argVal"
        ;;
        -c|--clean)
            CLEAN_BEFORE_START="1"
        ;;
        -h|--help|-help|--h)
            showUsage
            exit
        ;;
    esac
done

I give you The Function parse_params that will parse params from the command line.

  1. It is a pure Bash solution, no additional utilities.
  2. Does not pollute global scope.
  3. Effortlessly returns you simple to use variables, that you could build further logic on.
  4. Amount of dashes before params does not matter (--all equals -all equals all=all)

The script below is a copy-paste working demonstration. See show_use function to understand how to use parse_params.

Limitations:

  1. Does not support space delimited params (-d 1)
  2. Param names will lose dashes so --any-param and -anyparam are equivalent
  3. eval $(parse_params "$@") must be used inside bash function (it will not work in the global scope)

#!/bin/bash

# Universal Bash parameter parsing
# Parses equal sign separated params into local variables (--name=bob creates variable $name=="bob")
# Standalone named parameter value will equal its param name (--force creates variable $force=="force")
# Parses multi-valued named params into an array (--path=path1 --path=path2 creates ${path[*]} array)
# Parses un-named params into ${ARGV[*]} array
# Additionally puts all named params raw into ${ARGN[*]} array
# Additionally puts all standalone "option" params raw into ${ARGO[*]} array
# @author Oleksii Chekulaiev
# @version v1.4 (Jun-26-2018)
parse_params ()
{
    local existing_named
    local ARGV=() # un-named params
    local ARGN=() # named params
    local ARGO=() # options (--params)
    echo "local ARGV=(); local ARGN=(); local ARGO=();"
    while [[ "$1" != "" ]]; do
        # Escape asterisk to prevent bash asterisk expansion
        _escaped=${1/\*/\'\"*\"\'}
        # If equals delimited named parameter
        if [[ "$1" =~ ^..*=..* ]]; then
            # Add to named parameters array
            echo "ARGN+=('$_escaped');"
            # key is part before first =
            local _key=$(echo "$1" | cut -d = -f 1)
            # val is everything after key and = (protect from param==value error)
            local _val="${1/$_key=}"
            # remove dashes from key name
            _key=${_key//\-}
            # skip when key is empty
            if [[ "$_key" == "" ]]; then
                shift
                continue
            fi
            # search for existing parameter name
            if (echo "$existing_named" | grep "\b$_key\b" >/dev/null); then
                # if name already exists then it's a multi-value named parameter
                # re-declare it as an array if needed
                if ! (declare -p _key 2> /dev/null | grep -q 'declare \-a'); then
                    echo "$_key=(\"\$$_key\");"
                fi
                # append new value
                echo "$_key+=('$_val');"
            else
                # single-value named parameter
                echo "local $_key=\"$_val\";"
                existing_named=" $_key"
            fi
        # If standalone named parameter
        elif [[ "$1" =~ ^\-. ]]; then
            # remove dashes
            local _key=${1//\-}
            # skip when key is empty
            if [[ "$_key" == "" ]]; then
                shift
                continue
            fi
            # Add to options array
            echo "ARGO+=('$_escaped');"
            echo "local $_key=\"$_key\";"
        # non-named parameter
        else
            # Escape asterisk to prevent bash asterisk expansion
            _escaped=${1/\*/\'\"*\"\'}
            echo "ARGV+=('$_escaped');"
        fi
        shift
    done
}

#--------------------------- DEMO OF THE USAGE -------------------------------

show_use ()
{
    eval $(parse_params "$@")
    # --
    echo "${ARGV[0]}" # print first unnamed param
    echo "${ARGV[1]}" # print second unnamed param
    echo "${ARGN[0]}" # print first named param
    echo "${ARG0[0]}" # print first option param (--force)
    echo "$anyparam"  # print --anyparam value
    echo "$k"         # print k=5 value
    echo "${multivalue[0]}" # print first value of multi-value
    echo "${multivalue[1]}" # print second value of multi-value
    [[ "$force" == "force" ]] && echo "\$force is set so let the force be with you"
}

show_use "param 1" --anyparam="my value" param2 k=5 --force --multi-value=test1 --multi-value=test2

This is how I do in a function to avoid breaking getopts run at the same time somewhere higher in stack:

function waitForWeb () {
   local OPTIND=1 OPTARG OPTION
   local host=localhost port=8080 proto=http
   while getopts "h:p:r:" OPTION; do
      case "$OPTION" in
      h)
         host="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      p)
         port="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      r)
         proto="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      esac
   done
...
}

EasyOptions does not require any parsing:

## Options:
##   --verbose, -v  Verbose mode
##   --output=FILE  Output filename

source easyoptions || exit

if test -n "${verbose}"; then
    echo "output file is ${output}"
    echo "${arguments[@]}"
fi
  • It took me a minute to realize that the comments at the top of your example script are being parsed to provide a default usage help string, as well as argument specifications. This is a brilliant solution and I'm sorry that it only got 6 votes in 2 years. Perhaps this question is too swamped for people to notice. – Metamorphic Sep 9 at 7:44
  • In one sense your solution is by far the best (aside from @OleksiiChekulaiev's which doesn't support "standard" option syntax). This is because your solution only requires the script writer to specify the name of each option once. The fact that other solutions require it to be specified 3 times - in the usage, in the 'case' pattern, and in the setting of the variable - has continually annoyed me. Even getopt has this problem. However, your code is slow on my machine - 0.11s for the Bash implementation, 0.28s for the Ruby. Versus 0.02s for explicit "while-case" parsing. – Metamorphic Sep 9 at 7:51
  • I want a faster version, maybe written in C. Also, a version which is compatible with zsh. Maybe this deserves a separate question ("Is there a way to parse command-line arguments in Bash-like shells which accepts standard long-option syntax and doesn't require option names to be typed more than once?"). – Metamorphic Sep 9 at 8:04

I'd like to offer my version of option parsing, that allows for the following:

-s p1
--stage p1
-w somefolder
--workfolder somefolder
-sw p1 somefolder
-e=hello

Also allows for this (could be unwanted):

-s--workfolder p1 somefolder
-se=hello p1
-swe=hello p1 somefolder

You have to decide before use if = is to be used on an option or not. This is to keep the code clean(ish).

while [[ $# > 0 ]]
do
    key="$1"
    while [[ ${key+x} ]]
    do
        case $key in
            -s*|--stage)
                STAGE="$2"
                shift # option has parameter
                ;;
            -w*|--workfolder)
                workfolder="$2"
                shift # option has parameter
                ;;
            -e=*)
                EXAMPLE="${key#*=}"
                break # option has been fully handled
                ;;
            *)
                # unknown option
                echo Unknown option: $key #1>&2
                exit 10 # either this: my preferred way to handle unknown options
                break # or this: do this to signal the option has been handled (if exit isn't used)
                ;;
        esac
        # prepare for next option in this key, if any
        [[ "$key" = -? || "$key" == --* ]] && unset key || key="${key/#-?/-}"
    done
    shift # option(s) fully processed, proceed to next input argument
done
  • 1
    what's the meaning for "+x" on ${key+x} ? – Luca Davanzo Nov 14 '16 at 17:56
  • 1
    It is a test to see if 'key' is present or not. Further down I unset key and this breaks the inner while loop. – galmok Nov 15 '16 at 9:10

Note that getopt(1) was a short living mistake from AT&T.

getopt was created in 1984 but already buried in 1986 because it was not really usable.

A proof for the fact that getopt is very outdated is that the getopt(1) man page still mentions "$*" instead of "$@", that was added to the Bourne Shell in 1986 together with the getopts(1) shell builtin in order to deal with arguments with spaces inside.

BTW: if you are interested in parsing long options in shell scripts, it may be of interest to know that the getopt(3) implementation from libc (Solaris) and ksh93 both added a uniform long option implementation that supports long options as aliases for short options. This causes ksh93 and the Bourne Shell to implement a uniform interface for long options via getopts.

An example for long options taken from the Bourne Shell man page:

getopts "f:(file)(input-file)o:(output-file)" OPTX "$@"

shows how long option aliases may be used in both Bourne Shell and ksh93.

See the man page of a recent Bourne Shell:

http://schillix.sourceforge.net/man/man1/bosh.1.html

and the man page for getopt(3) from OpenSolaris:

http://schillix.sourceforge.net/man/man3c/getopt.3c.html

and last, the getopt(1) man page to verify the outdated $*:

http://schillix.sourceforge.net/man/man1/getopt.1.html

Mixing positional and flag-based arguments

--param=arg (equals delimited)

Freely mixing flags between positional arguments:

./script.sh dumbo 127.0.0.1 --environment=production -q -d
./script.sh dumbo --environment=production 127.0.0.1 --quiet -d

can be accomplished with a fairly concise approach:

# process flags
pointer=1
while [[ $pointer -le $# ]]; do
   param=${!pointer}
   if [[ $param != "-"* ]]; then ((pointer++)) # not a parameter flag so advance pointer
   else
      case $param in
         # paramter-flags with arguments
         -e=*|--environment=*) environment="${param#*=}";;
                  --another=*) another="${param#*=}";;

         # binary flags
         -q|--quiet) quiet=true;;
                 -d) debug=true;;
      esac

      # splice out pointer frame from positional list
      [[ $pointer -gt 1 ]] \
         && set -- ${@:1:((pointer - 1))} ${@:((pointer + 1)):$#} \
         || set -- ${@:((pointer + 1)):$#};
   fi
done

# positional remain
node_name=$1
ip_address=$2

--param arg (space delimited)

It's usualy clearer to not mix --flag=value and --flag value styles.

./script.sh dumbo 127.0.0.1 --environment production -q -d

This is a little dicey to read, but is still valid

./script.sh dumbo --environment production 127.0.0.1 --quiet -d

Source

# process flags
pointer=1
while [[ $pointer -le $# ]]; do
   if [[ ${!pointer} != "-"* ]]; then ((pointer++)) # not a parameter flag so advance pointer
   else
      param=${!pointer}
      ((pointer_plus = pointer + 1))
      slice_len=1

      case $param in
         # paramter-flags with arguments
         -e|--environment) environment=${!pointer_plus}; ((slice_len++));;
                --another) another=${!pointer_plus}; ((slice_len++));;

         # binary flags
         -q|--quiet) quiet=true;;
                 -d) debug=true;;
      esac

      # splice out pointer frame from positional list
      [[ $pointer -gt 1 ]] \
         && set -- ${@:1:((pointer - 1))} ${@:((pointer + $slice_len)):$#} \
         || set -- ${@:((pointer + $slice_len)):$#};
   fi
done

# positional remain
node_name=$1
ip_address=$2

Assume we create a shell script named test_args.sh as follow

#!/bin/sh
until [ $# -eq 0 ]
do
  name=${1:1}; shift;
  if [[ -z "$1" || $1 == -* ]] ; then eval "export $name=true"; else eval "export $name=$1"; shift; fi  
done
echo "year=$year month=$month day=$day flag=$flag"

After we run the following command:

sh test_args.sh  -year 2017 -flag  -month 12 -day 22 

The output would be:

year=2017 month=12 day=22 flag=true
  • 1
    This takes the same approach as Noah's answer, but has less safety checks / safeguards. This allows us to write arbitrary arguments into the script's environment and I'm pretty sure your use of eval here may allow command injection. – Will Barnwell Oct 10 '17 at 23:57

Use module "arguments" from bash-modules

Example:

#!/bin/bash
. import.sh log arguments

NAME="world"

parse_arguments "-n|--name)NAME;S" -- "$@" || {
  error "Cannot parse command line."
  exit 1
}

info "Hello, $NAME!"

This also might be useful to know, you can set a value and if someone provides input, override the default with that value..

myscript.sh -f ./serverlist.txt or just ./myscript.sh (and it takes defaults)

    #!/bin/bash
    # --- set the value, if there is inputs, override the defaults.

    HOME_FOLDER="${HOME}/owned_id_checker"
    SERVER_FILE_LIST="${HOME_FOLDER}/server_list.txt"

    while [[ $# > 1 ]]
    do
    key="$1"
    shift

    case $key in
        -i|--inputlist)
        SERVER_FILE_LIST="$1"
        shift
        ;;
    esac
    done


    echo "SERVER LIST   = ${SERVER_FILE_LIST}"

Another solution without getopt[s], POSIX, old Unix style

Similar to the solution Bruno Bronosky posted this here is one without the usage of getopt(s).

Main differentiating feature of my solution is that it allows to have options concatenated together just like tar -xzf foo.tar.gz is equal to tar -x -z -f foo.tar.gz. And just like in tar, ps etc. the leading hyphen is optional for a block of short options (but this can be changed easily). Long options are supported as well (but when a block starts with one then two leading hyphens are required).

Code with example options

#!/bin/sh

echo
echo "POSIX-compliant getopt(s)-free old-style-supporting option parser from phk@[se.unix]"
echo

print_usage() {
  echo "Usage:

  $0 {a|b|c} [ARG...]

Options:

  --aaa-0-args
  -a
    Option without arguments.

  --bbb-1-args ARG
  -b ARG
    Option with one argument.

  --ccc-2-args ARG1 ARG2
  -c ARG1 ARG2
    Option with two arguments.

" >&2
}

if [ $# -le 0 ]; then
  print_usage
  exit 1
fi

opt=
while :; do

  if [ $# -le 0 ]; then

    # no parameters remaining -> end option parsing
    break

  elif [ ! "$opt" ]; then

    # we are at the beginning of a fresh block
    # remove optional leading hyphen and strip trailing whitespaces
    opt=$(echo "$1" | sed 's/^-\?\([a-zA-Z0-9\?-]*\)/\1/')

  fi

  # get the first character -> check whether long option
  first_chr=$(echo "$opt" | awk '{print substr($1, 1, 1)}')
  [ "$first_chr" = - ] && long_option=T || long_option=F

  # note to write the options here with a leading hyphen less
  # also do not forget to end short options with a star
  case $opt in

    -)

      # end of options
      shift
      break
      ;;

    a*|-aaa-0-args)

      echo "Option AAA activated!"
      ;;

    b*|-bbb-1-args)

      if [ "$2" ]; then
        echo "Option BBB with argument '$2' activated!"
        shift
      else
        echo "BBB parameters incomplete!" >&2
        print_usage
        exit 1
      fi
      ;;

    c*|-ccc-2-args)

      if [ "$2" ] && [ "$3" ]; then
        echo "Option CCC with arguments '$2' and '$3' activated!"
        shift 2
      else
        echo "CCC parameters incomplete!" >&2
        print_usage
        exit 1
      fi
      ;;

    h*|\?*|-help)

      print_usage
      exit 0
      ;;

    *)

      if [ "$long_option" = T ]; then
        opt=$(echo "$opt" | awk '{print substr($1, 2)}')
      else
        opt=$first_chr
      fi
      printf 'Error: Unknown option: "%s"\n' "$opt" >&2
      print_usage
      exit 1
      ;;

  esac

  if [ "$long_option" = T ]; then

    # if we had a long option then we are going to get a new block next
    shift
    opt=

  else

    # if we had a short option then just move to the next character
    opt=$(echo "$opt" | awk '{print substr($1, 2)}')

    # if block is now empty then shift to the next one
    [ "$opt" ] || shift

  fi

done

echo "Doing something..."

exit 0

For the example usage please see the examples further below.

Position of options with arguments

For what its worth there the options with arguments don't be the last (only long options need to be). So while e.g. in tar (at least in some implementations) the f options needs to be last because the file name follows (tar xzf bar.tar.gz works but tar xfz bar.tar.gz does not) this is not the case here (see the later examples).

Multiple options with arguments

As another bonus the option parameters are consumed in the order of the options by the parameters with required options. Just look at the output of my script here with the command line abc X Y Z (or -abc X Y Z):

Option AAA activated!
Option BBB with argument 'X' activated!
Option CCC with arguments 'Y' and 'Z' activated!

Long options concatenated as well

Also you can also have long options in option block given that they occur last in the block. So the following command lines are all equivalent (including the order in which the options and its arguments are being processed):

  • -cba Z Y X
  • cba Z Y X
  • -cb-aaa-0-args Z Y X
  • -c-bbb-1-args Z Y X -a
  • --ccc-2-args Z Y -ba X
  • c Z Y b X a
  • -c Z Y -b X -a
  • --ccc-2-args Z Y --bbb-1-args X --aaa-0-args

All of these lead to:

Option CCC with arguments 'Z' and 'Y' activated!
Option BBB with argument 'X' activated!
Option AAA activated!
Doing something...

Not in this solution

Optional arguments

Options with optional arguments should be possible with a bit of work, e.g. by looking forward whether there is a block without a hyphen; the user would then need to put a hyphen in front of every block following a block with a parameter having an optional parameter. Maybe this is too complicated to communicate to the user so better just require a leading hyphen altogether in this case.

Things get even more complicated with multiple possible parameters. I would advise against making the options trying to be smart by determining whether the an argument might be for it or not (e.g. with an option just takes a number as an optional argument) because this might break in the future.

I personally favor additional options instead of optional arguments.

Option arguments introduced with an equal sign

Just like with optional arguments I am not a fan of this (BTW, is there a thread for discussing the pros/cons of different parameter styles?) but if you want this you could probably implement it yourself just like done at http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035#Manual_loop with a --long-with-arg=?* case statement and then stripping the equal sign (this is BTW the site that says that making parameter concatenation is possible with some effort but "left [it] as an exercise for the reader" which made me take them at their word but I started from scratch).

Other notes

POSIX-compliant, works even on ancient Busybox setups I had to deal with (with e.g. cut, head and getopts missing).

Solution that preserves unhandled arguments. Demos Included.

Here is my solution. It is VERY flexible and unlike others, shouldn't require external packages and handles leftover arguments cleanly.

Usage is: ./myscript -flag flagvariable -otherflag flagvar2

All you have to do is edit the validflags line. It prepends a hyphen and searches all arguments. It then defines the next argument as the flag name e.g.

./myscript -flag flagvariable -otherflag flagvar2
echo $flag $otherflag
flagvariable flagvar2

The main code (short version, verbose with examples further down, also a version with erroring out):

#!/usr/bin/env bash
#shebang.io
validflags="rate time number"
count=1
for arg in $@
do
    match=0
    argval=$1
    for flag in $validflags
    do
        sflag="-"$flag
        if [ "$argval" == "$sflag" ]
        then
            declare $flag=$2
            match=1
        fi
    done
        if [ "$match" == "1" ]
    then
        shift 2
    else
        leftovers=$(echo $leftovers $argval)
        shift
    fi
    count=$(($count+1))
done
#Cleanup then restore the leftovers
shift $#
set -- $leftovers

The verbose version with built in echo demos:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
#shebang.io
rate=30
time=30
number=30
echo "all args
$@"
validflags="rate time number"
count=1
for arg in $@
do
    match=0
    argval=$1
#   argval=$(echo $@ | cut -d ' ' -f$count)
    for flag in $validflags
    do
            sflag="-"$flag
        if [ "$argval" == "$sflag" ]
        then
            declare $flag=$2
            match=1
        fi
    done
        if [ "$match" == "1" ]
    then
        shift 2
    else
        leftovers=$(echo $leftovers $argval)
        shift
    fi
    count=$(($count+1))
done

#Cleanup then restore the leftovers
echo "pre final clear args:
$@"
shift $#
echo "post final clear args:
$@"
set -- $leftovers
echo "all post set args:
$@"
echo arg1: $1 arg2: $2

echo leftovers: $leftovers
echo rate $rate time $time number $number

Final one, this one errors out if an invalid -argument is passed through.

#!/usr/bin/env bash
#shebang.io
rate=30
time=30
number=30
validflags="rate time number"
count=1
for arg in $@
do
    argval=$1
    match=0
        if [ "${argval:0:1}" == "-" ]
    then
        for flag in $validflags
        do
                sflag="-"$flag
            if [ "$argval" == "$sflag" ]
            then
                declare $flag=$2
                match=1
            fi
        done
        if [ "$match" == "0" ]
        then
            echo "Bad argument: $argval"
            exit 1
        fi
        shift 2
    else
        leftovers=$(echo $leftovers $argval)
        shift
    fi
    count=$(($count+1))
done
#Cleanup then restore the leftovers
shift $#
set -- $leftovers
echo rate $rate time $time number $number
echo leftovers: $leftovers

Pros: What it does, it handles very well. It preserves unused arguments which a lot of the other solutions here don't. It also allows for variables to be called without being defined by hand in the script. It also allows prepopulation of variables if no corresponding argument is given. (See verbose example).

Cons: Can't parse a single complex arg string e.g. -xcvf would process as a single argument. You could somewhat easily write additional code into mine that adds this functionality though.

The top answer to this question seemed a bit buggy when I tried it -- here's my solution which I've found to be more robust:

boolean_arg=""
arg_with_value=""

while [[ $# -gt 0 ]]
do
key="$1"
case $key in
    -b|--boolean-arg)
    boolean_arg=true
    shift
    ;;
    -a|--arg-with-value)
    arg_with_value="$2"
    shift
    shift
    ;;
    -*)
    echo "Unknown option: $1"
    exit 1
    ;;
    *)
    arg_num=$(( $arg_num + 1 ))
    case $arg_num in
        1)
        first_normal_arg="$1"
        shift
        ;;
        2)
        second_normal_arg="$1"
        shift
        ;;
        *)
        bad_args=TRUE
    esac
    ;;
esac
done

# Handy to have this here when adding arguments to
# see if they're working. Just edit the '0' to be '1'.
if [[ 0 == 1 ]]; then
    echo "first_normal_arg: $first_normal_arg"
    echo "second_normal_arg: $second_normal_arg"
    echo "boolean_arg: $boolean_arg"
    echo "arg_with_value: $arg_with_value"
    exit 0
fi

if [[ $bad_args == TRUE || $arg_num < 2 ]]; then
    echo "Usage: $(basename "$0") <first-normal-arg> <second-normal-arg> [--boolean-arg] [--arg-with-value VALUE]"
    exit 1
fi

This example shows how to use getopt and eval and HEREDOC and shift to handle short and long parameters with and without a required value that follows. Also the switch/case statement is concise and easy to follow.

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# usage function
function usage()
{
   cat << HEREDOC

   Usage: $progname [--num NUM] [--time TIME_STR] [--verbose] [--dry-run]

   optional arguments:
     -h, --help           show this help message and exit
     -n, --num NUM        pass in a number
     -t, --time TIME_STR  pass in a time string
     -v, --verbose        increase the verbosity of the bash script
     --dry-run            do a dry run, don't change any files

HEREDOC
}  

# initialize variables
progname=$(basename $0)
verbose=0
dryrun=0
num_str=
time_str=

# use getopt and store the output into $OPTS
# note the use of -o for the short options, --long for the long name options
# and a : for any option that takes a parameter
OPTS=$(getopt -o "hn:t:v" --long "help,num:,time:,verbose,dry-run" -n "$progname" -- "$@")
if [ $? != 0 ] ; then echo "Error in command line arguments." >&2 ; usage; exit 1 ; fi
eval set -- "$OPTS"

while true; do
  # uncomment the next line to see how shift is working
  # echo "\$1:\"$1\" \$2:\"$2\""
  case "$1" in
    -h | --help ) usage; exit; ;;
    -n | --num ) num_str="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    -t | --time ) time_str="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    --dry-run ) dryrun=1; shift ;;
    -v | --verbose ) verbose=$((verbose + 1)); shift ;;
    -- ) shift; break ;;
    * ) break ;;
  esac
done

if (( $verbose > 0 )); then

   # print out all the parameters we read in
   cat <<-EOM
   num=$num_str
   time=$time_str
   verbose=$verbose
   dryrun=$dryrun
EOM
fi

# The rest of your script below

The most significant lines of the script above are these:

OPTS=$(getopt -o "hn:t:v" --long "help,num:,time:,verbose,dry-run" -n "$progname" -- "$@")
if [ $? != 0 ] ; then echo "Error in command line arguments." >&2 ; exit 1 ; fi
eval set -- "$OPTS"

while true; do
  case "$1" in
    -h | --help ) usage; exit; ;;
    -n | --num ) num_str="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    -t | --time ) time_str="$2"; shift 2 ;;
    --dry-run ) dryrun=1; shift ;;
    -v | --verbose ) verbose=$((verbose + 1)); shift ;;
    -- ) shift; break ;;
    * ) break ;;
  esac
done

Short, to the point, readable, and handles just about everything (IMHO).

Hope that helps someone.

I have write a bash helper to write a nice bash tool

project home: https://gitlab.mbedsys.org/mbedsys/bashopts

example:

#!/bin/bash -ei

# load the library
. bashopts.sh

# Enable backtrace dusplay on error
trap 'bashopts_exit_handle' ERR

# Initialize the library
bashopts_setup -n "$0" -d "This is myapp tool description displayed on help message" -s "$HOME/.config/myapprc"

# Declare the options
bashopts_declare -n first_name -l first -o f -d "First name" -t string -i -s -r
bashopts_declare -n last_name -l last -o l -d "Last name" -t string -i -s -r
bashopts_declare -n display_name -l display-name -t string -d "Display name" -e "\$first_name \$last_name"
bashopts_declare -n age -l number -d "Age" -t number
bashopts_declare -n email_list -t string -m add -l email -d "Email adress"

# Parse arguments
bashopts_parse_args "$@"

# Process argument
bashopts_process_args

will give help:

NAME:
    ./example.sh - This is myapp tool description displayed on help message

USAGE:
    [options and commands] [-- [extra args]]

OPTIONS:
    -h,--help                          Display this help
    -n,--non-interactive true          Non interactive mode - [$bashopts_non_interactive] (type:boolean, default:false)
    -f,--first "John"                  First name - [$first_name] (type:string, default:"")
    -l,--last "Smith"                  Last name - [$last_name] (type:string, default:"")
    --display-name "John Smith"        Display name - [$display_name] (type:string, default:"$first_name $last_name")
    --number 0                         Age - [$age] (type:number, default:0)
    --email                            Email adress - [$email_list] (type:string, default:"")

enjoy :)

  • I get this on Mac OS X: ``` lib/bashopts.sh: line 138: declare: -A: invalid option declare: usage: declare [-afFirtx] [-p] [name[=value] ...] Error in lib/bashopts.sh:138. 'declare -x -A bashopts_optprop_name' exited with status 2 Call tree: 1: lib/controller.sh:4 source(...) Exiting with status 1 ``` – Josh Wulf Jun 24 '17 at 18:07
  • You need Bash version 4 to use this. On Mac, the default version is 3. You can use home brew to install bash 4. – Josh Wulf Jun 24 '17 at 18:17

Here is my approach - using regexp.

  • no getopts
  • it handles block of short parameters -qwerty
  • it handles short parameters -q -w -e
  • it handles long options --qwerty
  • you can pass attribute to short or long option (if you are using block of short options, attribute is attached to the last option)
  • you can use spaces or = to provide attributes, but attribute matches until encountering hyphen+space "delimiter", so in --q=qwe ty qwe ty is one attribute
  • it handles mix of all above so -o a -op attr ibute --option=att ribu te --op-tion attribute --option att-ribute is valid

script:

#!/usr/bin/env sh

help_menu() {
  echo "Usage:

  ${0##*/} [-h][-l FILENAME][-d]

Options:

  -h, --help
    display this help and exit

  -l, --logfile=FILENAME
    filename

  -d, --debug
    enable debug
  "
}

parse_options() {
  case $opt in
    h|help)
      help_menu
      exit
     ;;
    l|logfile)
      logfile=${attr}
      ;;
    d|debug)
      debug=true
      ;;
    *)
      echo "Unknown option: ${opt}\nRun ${0##*/} -h for help.">&2
      exit 1
  esac
}
options=$@

until [ "$options" = "" ]; do
  if [[ $options =~ (^ *(--([a-zA-Z0-9-]+)|-([a-zA-Z0-9-]+))(( |=)(([\_\.\?\/\\a-zA-Z0-9]?[ -]?[\_\.\?a-zA-Z0-9]+)+))?(.*)|(.+)) ]]; then
    if [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[3]} ]]; then # for --option[=][attribute] or --option[=][attribute]
      opt=${BASH_REMATCH[3]}
      attr=${BASH_REMATCH[7]}
      options=${BASH_REMATCH[9]}
    elif [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[4]} ]]; then # for block options -qwert[=][attribute] or single short option -a[=][attribute]
      pile=${BASH_REMATCH[4]}
      while (( ${#pile} > 1 )); do
        opt=${pile:0:1}
        attr=""
        pile=${pile/${pile:0:1}/}
        parse_options
      done
      opt=$pile
      attr=${BASH_REMATCH[7]}
      options=${BASH_REMATCH[9]}
    else # leftovers that don't match
      opt=${BASH_REMATCH[10]}
      options=""
    fi
    parse_options
  fi
done
  • Like this one. Maybe just add -e param to echo with new line. – mauron85 Jun 21 '17 at 6:03

Here is my improved solution of Bruno Bronosky's answer using variable arrays.

it lets you mix parameters position and give you a parameter array preserving the order without the options

#!/bin/bash

echo $@

PARAMS=()
SOFT=0
SKIP=()
for i in "$@"
do
case $i in
    -n=*|--skip=*)
    SKIP+=("${i#*=}")
    ;;
    -s|--soft)
    SOFT=1
    ;;
    *)
        # unknown option
        PARAMS+=("$i")
    ;;
esac
done
echo "SKIP            = ${SKIP[@]}"
echo "SOFT            = $SOFT"
    echo "Parameters:"
    echo ${PARAMS[@]}

Will output for example:

$ ./test.sh parameter -s somefile --skip=.c --skip=.obj
parameter -s somefile --skip=.c --skip=.obj
SKIP            = .c .obj
SOFT            = 1
Parameters:
parameter somefile
  • You use shift on the known arguments and not on the unknown ones so your remaining $@ will be all but the first two arguments (in the order they are passed in), which could lead to some mistakes if you try to use $@ later. You don't need the shift for the = parameters, since you're not handling spaces and you're getting the value with the substring removal #*= – Jason S Dec 3 '17 at 1:01
  • You're right, in fact, since I build a PARAMS variable, I don't need to use shift at all – Masadow Dec 5 '17 at 9:17

I wanna submit my project : https://github.com/flyingangel/argparser

source argparser.sh
parse_args "$@"

Simple as that. The environment will be populated with variables with the same name as the arguments

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