20

TL;DR How do I find out whether a function was defined using @classmethod or something with the same effect?


My problem

For implementing a class decorator I would like to check if a method takes the class as its first argument, for example as achieved via

@classmethod
def function(cls, ...):

I found a solution to check for @staticmethod via the types module (isinstance(foo, types.UnboundMethodType) is False if the foo is static, see here), but did not find anything on how to do so for @classmethod


Context

What I am trying to do is something along the lines of

def class_decorator(cls):
    for member in cls.__dict__:
        if (isclassmethod(getattr(cls, member))):
            # do something with the method
            setattr(cls, member, modified_method)
    return cls

and I do not know how to implement what I called isclassmethod in this example

5 Answers 5

37

If the object is a method object, and so has a method.__self__ attribute, and that attribute is the class you got the attribute from, then it'll take the class as the first argument. It has been bound to the class.

Note that you already have a bound object at this point, so you don't need to pass in the class again, unless you first extract the original function from method.__func__.

Here is an illustration, the class Foo has a class method bar and a regular method baz, which is not bound when you access it directly on the class:

>>> class Foo:
...     @classmethod
...     def bar(cls):
...         pass
...     def baz(self):
...         pass
... 
>>> Foo.baz
<function Foo.baz at 0x1097d1e18>
>>> Foo.bar
<bound method Foo.bar of <class '__main__.Foo'>>
>>> Foo.bar.__self__
<class '__main__.Foo'>
>>> Foo.bar.__self__ is Foo
True

Calling Foo.bar() automatically passes in Foo.bar.__self__ as the first argument.

If you need to test such methods, use inspect.ismethod(), and if that returns True test the __self__ attribute:

import inspect

if inspect.ismethod(cls.method) and cls.method.__self__ is cls:
    # method bound to the class, e.g. a classmethod

This should work for any custom descriptors that work like classmethod does, as well.

If you need to know with certainty that the method was produced by a classmethod object, you'll need to look up the attributes directly in the class namespace (cls.__dict__ or vars(cls)), and do so in each class in the class hierarchy in method resolution order:

def isclassmethod(method):
    bound_to = getattr(method, '__self__', None)
    if not isinstance(bound_to, type):
        # must be bound to a class
        return False
    name = method.__name__
    for cls in bound_to.__mro__:
        descriptor = vars(cls).get(name)
        if descriptor is not None:
            return isinstance(descriptor, classmethod)
    return False

and a full test of the above two approaches using a base class and a derived class, with a custom descriptor that binds a function the same way a classmethod would, but is not, itself, a classmethod:

>>> class notclassmethod:
...     def __init__(self, f):
...         self.f = f
...     def __get__(self, _, typ=None):
...         return self.f.__get__(typ, typ)
...
>>> class Base:
...     @classmethod
...     def base_cm(cls): pass
...     @notclassmethod
...     def base_ncm(cls): pass
...     def base_m(self): pass
...
>>> class Derived(Base):
...     @classmethod
...     def derived_cm(cls): pass
...     @notclassmethod
...     def derived_ncm(cls): pass
...     def derived_m(self): pass
...
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.base_cm) and Derived.base_cm.__self__ is Derived
True
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.base_ncm) and Derived.base_ncm.__self__ is Derived
True
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.base_m) and Derived.base_m.__self__ is Derived
False
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.derived_cm) and Derived.derived_cm.__self__ is Derived
True
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.derived_ncm) and Derived.derived_ncm.__self__ is Derived
True
>>> inspect.ismethod(Derived.derived_m) and Derived.derived_m.__self__ is Derived
False
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.base_cm)
True
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.base_ncm)
False
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.base_m)
False
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.derived_cm)
True
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.derived_ncm)
False
>>> isclassmethod(Derived.derived_m)
False

The isclassmethod() function correctly distinguishes between the classmethod and notclassmethod descriptors.


Historical note: this answer included references to Python 2, but with Python 2 having reached EOL were removed as no longer relevant.

5
  • inspect.ismethod(cls.method) is False with Python 3.5+.
    – kirin
    Oct 15, 2020 at 8:51
  • @fx-kirin: no, it is True for classmethod objects. You are using it with a regular function, and then you'll see False in any Python 3 release, not just 3.5+. This is covered in my answer here.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 15, 2020 at 11:59
  • 1
    @fx-kirin: I've updated the answer to be clearer about the goal here, to detect the result of a function having been decorated with @classmethod, then looked up on the class.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 15, 2020 at 12:24
  • But the example remains wrong, consider: inspect.ismethod(Derived.derived_m) is False inspect.ismethod(Derived().derived_m) is True
    – Ali Afshar
    Jan 2, 2022 at 11:46
  • @AliAfshar: you misunderstood the answer then. Derived.derived_m is not a classmethod, so ismethod() indeed will return False.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Jan 19, 2022 at 22:11
12

You should use inspect.ismethod. It works because classmethod binds the function to the class object. See the following code:

>>> class Foo:
...     @classmethod
...     def bar():
...             pass
...     def baz():
...             pass
...
>>> Foo.bar
<bound method type.bar of <class '__main__.Foo'>>
>>> Foo.baz
<function Foo.baz at 0x0000000002CCC1E0>
>>> type(Foo.bar)
<class 'method'>
>>> type(Foo.baz)
<class 'function'>
>>> import inspect
>>> inspect.ismethod(Foo.bar)
True
>>> inspect.ismethod(Foo.baz)
False
3
  • 5
    This is only true for Python 3
    – Martijn Pieters
    Oct 7, 2013 at 15:02
  • 1
    Is there anything working for both Python 2 and Python 3 (personally, I use 2.7)
    – hlt
    Oct 7, 2013 at 15:03
  • @hlt you can check my answer below.
    – Saim Raza
    Aug 1, 2018 at 8:15
5
class Foo(object):
    @classmethod
    def baaz(cls):
        print "baaz"

isinstance(Foo.__dict__["baaz"], classmethod)
4
  • 1
    A better approach would be to use __name__ attribute instead of string for name. We avoid loose strings as much as possible in python. isinstance(Foo.__dict__[Foo.baaz.__name__], classmethod)
    – Saim Raza
    Aug 1, 2018 at 8:13
  • 1
    @SaimRaza while I globally agree with your comment, you have to be aware that the method's __name__ might not necessarily match the attribute name. Since we can get the attribute name from dir(cls) (or, in the OP example, directly from cls.__dict__), using the attribute name is safer than using the method's canonical name. Aug 1, 2018 at 10:49
  • could you please elaborate with an example? I am assuming we are limiting our scope to methods only. Are you referring to distinction between __name__ and __qualname__ in Python3?
    – Saim Raza
    Aug 1, 2018 at 13:42
  • examples could be either a misbehaving decorator that doesn't properly rename the wrapper function (in which case the __name__ will be the wrapper's one, not the decorated method name), or a function set as class attribute under a distinct name, ie Foo.bar = baaz (where Foo is a class and baaz a function). And no, I'm not talking about __qualname__ but about the attribute name (bar in the above example) vs the function's __name__ attribute's value (baaz in the above example). Aug 1, 2018 at 14:02
2

None of the answers address the problem of identifying whether a method is decorated with class method from an instance of the class. Following code explores the class dict of an instance to distinguish between classmethod from other methods.

class MyClass(object):
    @classmethod
    def class_method(cls):
        pass

    def instance_method(self):
        pass

    @staticmethod
    def static_method(): 
        pass

    def blas(): pass

t = MyClass()
isinstance(t.__class__.__dict__[t.class_method.__name__], classmethod)    # True
isinstance(t.__class__.__dict__[t.static_method.__name__], classmethod)   # False
isinstance(t.__class__.__dict__[t.instance_method.__name__], classmethod) # False
isinstance(t.__class__.__dict__[t.blas.__name__], classmethod)            # False

This will work for both Python 2 and 3.

1

This works for me:

def is_classmethod(method):
    """
    Is method a classmethod?
    """
    return isinstance(getattr(method, '__self__', None), type)

It basically tests if method.__self__ exists and is a class, as in Martijn's answer, but does not require access to the class itself.

1
  • 1
    This seems to be a generic type. We can't guarantee that the type would be classmethod in all cases.
    – Saim Raza
    Aug 1, 2018 at 8:11

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