13

I am using unsigned long long integer format in order to calculate big factorials. However my code fails at some point can you have a look at it? Actually it is part of a larger code for Taylor expansion of exponential function, but that part is irrelevant at this point. I will appreciate any suggestions.

Thanks

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
//We need to write a factorial function beforehand, since we
//have factorial in the denominators.
//Remembering that factorials are defined for integers; it is
//possible to define factorials of non-integer numbers using
//Gamma Function but we will omit that.
//We first declare the factorial function as follows:
unsigned long long factorial (int);
//Long long integer format only allows numbers in the order of 10^18 so 
//we shall use the sign bit in order to increase our range.
//Now we define it,
unsigned long long
factorial(int n)
{
//Here s is the free parameter which is increased by one in each step and
//pro is the initial product and by setting pro to be 0 we also cover the
//case of zero factorial.
    int s = 1;
    unsigned long long pro = 1;
    if (n < 0)
        printf("Factorial is not defined for a negative number \n");
    else {
    while (n >= s) { 
    printf("%d \n", s);
    pro *= s;
    s++;
    printf("%llu \n", pro);
    }
    return pro;
    }
}

int main ()
{
    int x[12] = { 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 100, -1, -5, -10, -20, -50, -100};
//Here an array named "calc" is defined to store 
//the values of x.
unsigned long long  k = factorial(25);
printf("%llu \n", k);

//int k;
////The upper index controls the accuracy of the Taylor Series, so
////it is suitable to make it an adjustable parameter. 
//int p = 500;
//for ( k = 0; k < p; k++);

}
2

7 Answers 7

15

The limit on an unsigned long long is 18446744073709551615, or about 1.8e+19. 20! is about 2.4e+18, so within range, however 21! is about 5.1e+19, exceeding the maximum size of an unsigned long long.

You may find this helpful: Are there types bigger than long long int in C++?

7

You're overflowing your integer type. It's likely that unsigned long long is 64 bits long for you.

  • 20! is 0x21c3_677c_82b4_0000 which fits.
  • 21! is 0x2_c507_7d36_b8c4_0000 which does not fit.

You can look into libraries like GMP which enable arbitrarily large integers.


To extend the GMP comment. Here's some code that will calculate the factorial using GMP:

void factorial(unsigned long long n, mpz_t result) {
    mpz_set_ui(result, 1);

    while (n > 1) {
        mpz_mul_ui(result, result, n);
        n = n-1;
    }
}

int main() {
    mpz_t fact;
    mpz_init(fact);

    factorial(100, fact);

    char *as_str = mpz_get_str(NULL, 16, fact);
    printf("%s\n", as_str);

    mpz_clear(fact);
    free(as_str);
}

This will calculate factorial(100), and results in:

0x1b30964ec395dc24069528d54bbda40d16e966ef9a70eb21b5b2943a321cdf10391745570cca9420c6ecb3b72ed2ee8b02ea2735c61a000000000000000000000000

And just for fun, here's the C++ version. Constructors, destructors and operator overloading tend to make the C++ version of these things look a bit cleaner. The result is the same as before.

#include <gmpxx.h>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    mpz_class fact = 1;

    for (int i=2; i<=100; ++i)
        fact *= i;

    std::cout << "0x" << fact.get_str(16) << "\n";
}
2
  • 1
    Specifically, 21! would require 66 bits. Oct 7, 2013 at 17:04
  • @Vesnog: Yes. mpz_get_str's second argument is the base of the represented number. You can pass anything from 2 to 16 in there.
    – Bill Lynch
    Oct 7, 2013 at 17:27
5

Range of unsigned long long is usually 0 to 2^64 - 1 (18,446,744,073,709,551,615). 21! goes out of this range.

5
  • Yeah that is the problem I guess so that is the universal limit, kind of?
    – Vesnog
    Oct 7, 2013 at 17:11
  • Yes. It is C99 standard defined.
    – haccks
    Oct 7, 2013 at 17:12
  • @haccks Just note for clarity: 0 to 2^64 - 1 is the minimum range for unsigned long long. Oct 11, 2013 at 4:14
  • @chux; Then what is the maximum range?
    – haccks
    Oct 11, 2013 at 9:58
  • 1
    @haccks There is no C specification for a maximum range. A platform may use a 16-byte unsigned long long and have a range 0 to 2^128 - 1. If one wants with certainty a 64-bit number, C provides the uint64_t type. Oct 11, 2013 at 12:04
4

Indeed:

2^64 = 18446744073709551616
21!  = 51090942171709440000
20!  =  2432902008176640000

By the way, to calculate the result of a series (e.g., Taylor) you should not calculate each term separately; this will definitely bring you problems such as this one. Instead, try to calculate each term by reusing the previous one.

For example, the Taylor series for cos requires the summation of terms like:

(-1)^i * (x^(2*i)) / (2i)!

It is easy to see that each term can be calculated easily from the previous one:

newterm = - oldterm * x^2 / ((2i+1)*(2i+2))

So, I believe that you don't need to calculate large factorials, for what you're trying to do. On the other hand, if you need to, you'll have to use a library for big numbers, such as gmp.

2
  • I think that is the exact barrier how can I surpass it?
    – Vesnog
    Oct 7, 2013 at 17:07
  • On the other hand, one must be careful about the numerical stability of the algorithm when chaining all those FP calculations. Oct 7, 2013 at 17:11
2

factorial(25) should give the result 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 which is larger than the range of unsigned long long Data Type Ranges

2

A long long is only so big, and thus can only represent numbers so big. If you need an exact representation of bigger integers, you'll need to use something else (some 3-rd party library or some datatype you make yourself); if you don't need it to be exact, then you could use double's instead.

2
  • I infer from your comment that since we do not have something called long long long integer calculating 21! is impossible without resorting to external libraries of how to do so I have no idea of. Am I right? By the way how can you make datatypes ??
    – Vesnog
    Oct 7, 2013 at 17:10
  • I don't know of any compiler that supports long long long. As for a library, you could try this: gmplib.org Oct 7, 2013 at 17:29
0

A simple algorithm that i wrote. but it's in Java.. You can calculate factorial of 1000 in about 15 minutes.

This algorithm works with the basic formula that we learnt at primary school.

/* FOR BEST RESULT DON'T CHANGE THE CODE UNTIL YOU KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING */
    public String factorial(int number){
        if(number == 0) return "1";
        String result = "1";
        for(int i = 0; i < number; i++){
            result = *longNumberMultiplyingAlgorithm*(result, "" + (i + 1));
        }
        return result;  
    }

    public String longNumberMultiplyingAlgorithm(String number1, String number2){
            int maxLength = Math.max(number1.length(), number2.length());
            int a = 0;
            String[] numbers = new String[maxLength];

            if(number2.length() > number1.length()){
                String t = number1;
                number1 = number2;
                number2 = t;
            }       

            for(int i = 0; i < number1.length(); i++){
                numbers[i] = "";
                a = 0;
                for(int j = 0; j < number2.length(); j++){
                    int result = Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(number1.charAt(number1.length() - i - 1))) * Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(number2.charAt(number2.length() - j - 1)));
                    if(result + a < 10){
                        numbers[i] = (result + a) + "" + numbers[i];
                        a = 0;
                    }else{
                        result += a;
                        a = (int)((result + 0.0) / 10);
                        result -= a * 10;
                        numbers[i] = result + "" + numbers[i];
                    }
                }
                if(a != 0){
                    numbers[i] = a + "" + numbers[i];
                }
                for(int k = 0; k < i; k++){
                    numbers[i] += "0";
                }
            }
            return longNumberAdditionAlgorithm(numbers);
        }

    private String longNumberAdditionAlgorithm(String[] numbers) {
            String final_number = "0";
            for(int l = 0; l < numbers.length; l++){
                int maxLength = Math.max(final_number.length(), numbers[l].length());
                String number = "";
                int[] n = new int[maxLength];
                int a = 0;
                for(int i = 0; i < n.length; i++){
                    int result = 0;
                    if(i >= final_number.length()){
                        result = Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(numbers[l].charAt(numbers[l].length() - i - 1)));
                    }else
                    if(i >= numbers[l].length()){
                        result = Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(final_number.charAt(final_number.length() - i - 1)));
                    }else{
                        result = Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(final_number.charAt(final_number.length() - i - 1))) + Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(numbers[l].charAt(numbers[l].length() - i - 1)));
                    }
                    if(result + a < 10){
                        number = (result + a) + "" + number;
                        a = 0;
                    }else{
                        result -= 10;
                        number = (result + a) + "" + number;
                        a = 1;
                    }
                }
                if(a == 1){
                    number = a + "" + number;
                }
                final_number = number;
            }
            return final_number;
        }

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