46

I have the following functions :

void *foo(void *i) {
    int a = (int) i;
}

int main() {
    pthread_t thread;
    int i;
    pthread_create(&thread, 0, foo, (void *) i);
}

At compilation, there are some errors about casting ((void *) i and int a = (int) i). How can I pass an integer as the last argument of pthread_create properly?

5 Answers 5

55

Building on szx's answer (so give him the credit), here's how it would work in your for loop:

void *foo(void *i) {
    int a = *((int *) i);
    free(i);
}

int main() {
    pthread_t thread;
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++1 ) {
        int *arg = malloc(sizeof(*arg));
        if ( arg == NULL ) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Couldn't allocate memory for thread arg.\n");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }

        *arg = i;
        pthread_create(&thread, 0, foo, arg);
    }

    /*  Wait for threads, etc  */

    return 0;
}

On each iteration of the loop, you're allocating new memory, each with a different address, so the thing that gets passed to pthread_create() on each iteration is different, so none of your threads ends up trying to access the same memory and you don't get any thread safety issues in the way that you would if you just passed the address of i. In this case, you could also set up an array and pass the addresses of the elements.

16
  • 1
    I get this when I compile : error: invalid conversion from ‘void*’ to ‘int*’ at this line : int *arg = malloc(sizeof(*arg));. You should put (int *) before malloc.
    – Gradient
    Oct 8, 2013 at 0:35
  • 2
    @Gradient: You must be compiling this as C++. The cast is not necessary in C and, to my mind, should not be included.
    – Crowman
    Oct 8, 2013 at 0:38
  • I believe the statement int *arg = malloc(sizeof(*arg)); should instead be int *arg = malloc(sizeof(arg));. Here it works because a pointer on most machines is the size of int. However it may fail for other data types or even custom types. Correct me if I am wrong here
    – AjB
    Feb 11, 2015 at 15:36
  • 2
    @Pegasus: you are incorrect. Here you want to be allocating the correct amount of space for an int, not for a pointer to int. Your alternative would do the latter, so it's actually your suggestion that would only work if pointers and ints are the same size.
    – Crowman
    Feb 11, 2015 at 17:48
  • 1
    @Pegasus: No, it allocates space for an int. int * arg = malloc(sizeof(&arg)); would allocate space for a pointer to pointer to int. If you're "not convinced", then you're just confused about basic C syntax.
    – Crowman
    Feb 12, 2015 at 11:57
26

You can allocate an int on the heap and pass it to pthread_create(). You can then deallocate it in your thread function:

void *foo(void *i) {
    int a = *((int *) i);
    free(i);
}

int main() {
    pthread_t thread;
    int *i = malloc(sizeof(*i));
    pthread_create(&thread, 0, foo, (void *) i);
}
2
  • Like I said in another answer : I am not sure this solution work. By the time the first thread reaches int a = *((int *) i), the for loop could have changed the value of i. Thus, when the first thread tries to initialize a, it would not read the right value. Or maybe I am confused with the concept of threads?
    – Gradient
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:46
  • 1
    @Gradient: Your other comment was correct, but that's not what's happening here. This solution allocates new memory for the argument to each thread (or, at least, if you put it in a loop, you would allocate new memory in each loop) so each thread gets a different object, and no two threads try to access the same memory. You're getting the concept of threads right, this solution just doesn't exhibit the problem you mentioned. I think this solution would be improved by actually showing how it would work in a loop.
    – Crowman
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:48
11

You should cast the address of i (rather than the value of i as you do now) in the last argument of pthread_create().

pthread_create(&thread, 0, foo, (void *) &i);
                                         ^  is missing

And the casting is wrong in your function too. It should be:

int a = *((int*) i);
  1. If you intend to read the value, you should also initialize i to some value in main() as it's uninitialized now.

2 Use proper definition for main():

 int main(void) 

or int main(int argc, char *argv[]) or its equivalent.

7
  • Does that work if i is declared in a for loop? For example for (int i=0;...;...) Or should I declared it before the for loop?
    – Gradient
    Oct 7, 2013 at 21:13
  • Declaring in a for loop is no different & it would work the same way. But declaring variable in for loop is allowed only in C99 (or later) mode. You would need to compile with -std=c99 for example, along with other compiler options.
    – P.P
    Oct 7, 2013 at 21:22
  • Also, if I do &i, then I give the thread the address of variable i. If I create other threads, wouldn't i be shared between all threads? That would not be the desired behavior.
    – Gradient
    Oct 7, 2013 at 21:26
  • 3
    I am not sure the second solution would work. By the time, the first thread reaches int a = *((int *) i), the for loop could have changed the value of i. Thus, when the first thread tries to initialize a, it would not read the right value.
    – Gradient
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:06
  • 1
    @Gradient: You are correct, passing the address of the loop variable is not guaranteed to be safe. The results of casting an int to a pointer and back are implementation-defined, so this is not a great solution, either. Using malloc() is the best way.
    – Crowman
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:47
8

Old question, but I faced the same problem today, and I decided not to follow this path. My application was really about performance, so I chose to have this array of ints declared statically.

Since I don't know a lot of applications where your pthread_join / pthread_cancel is in another scope than your pthread_create, I chose this way :

#define NB_THREADS 4

void *job(void *_i) {
  unsigned int i = *((unsigned int *) _i);
}

int main () {
  unsigned int ints[NB_THREADS];
  pthread_t    threads[NB_THREADS];
  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < NB_THREADS; ++i) {
    ints[i] = i;
    pthread_create(&threads[i], NULL, job, &ints[i]);
  }
}

I find it more elegant, more efficient, and you don't have to worry about freeing since it only lives in this scope.

3

While this is an old question there is one option missing when all you need is to pass a positive integer like a descriptor: you can pass it directly as the address, while it it a hack it works well and avoid allocating anything :)

NOTE: the size of the integer must match the size of a pointer on your OS but nowadays most systems are native 64bits.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void *_thread_loop(void *p)
{
  uint64_t n = (uint64_t)p;

  printf("received %llu\n", n);

  return NULL;
}



int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
  pthread_t read_thread_id;
  uint64_t n = 42;
  pthread_create(&read_thread_id, NULL, _thread_loop, (void *)n);

  pthread_join(read_thread_id, NULL);
  return 0;
}
3
  • According to this answer, the result of this hack is implementation-defined and (generally speaking) not portable.
    – tonysdg
    Jan 16, 2018 at 13:54
  • I am not entirely sure the answer you link really means that, he says the result may not point to any valid data and that is obvious (the pointer will never be dereferenced) but so far I never had issues doing that, I have no tested exotic architectures though but worked for me on linux on x86 and am64 as well as arm (on a raspberrypi).
    – Schmurfy
    Jan 28, 2018 at 19:13
  • Oh, I highly doubt you'll ever have issues with it unless you're running on a really exotic architecture :-) And this hack has worked for me on more than a few occasions. I'm just posting for completeness!
    – tonysdg
    Jan 30, 2018 at 0:08

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