55

Consider the following program:

int main ()
{
    const int e = 10;

    for (decltype(e) i{0}; i < e; ++i) {
        // do something
    }
}

This fails to compile with clang (as well as gcc):

decltype.cpp:5:35: error: read-only variable is not assignable
    for (decltype(e) i{0}; i < e; ++i) {
                                  ^ ~

Basically, the compiler is assuming that i must be const, since e is.

Is there a way I can use decltype to get the type of e, but removing the const specifier?

6
  • @KerrekSB auto doesn't work here either. It will give me an int, regardless of whether e is an int. Oct 7, 2013 at 22:20
  • 2
    for (auto end = e, i = 0; i != end; ++i)...
    – Kerrek SB
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:21
  • @KerrekSB With that I get inconsistent deduction for ‘auto’ if e is anything other than int. Oct 7, 2013 at 22:22
  • 3
    @KerrekSB That won't neccessarily work, since all types deduced in a "comma separated auto declaration" have to be the same. Oct 8, 2013 at 8:10
  • 1
    @ChristianRau: What about auto end = e, i {}?
    – Kerrek SB
    Oct 8, 2013 at 8:12

5 Answers 5

57

I prefer auto i = decltype(e){0}; for this. It's a bit simpler than using type_traits, and I feel it more explicitly specifies the intent that you want a variable initialized to a 0 of e's type.

I've been using Herb's "AAA Style" a lot lately, so it could just be bias on my part.

3
  • 2
    This is excellent. It answers the real question I was after with a concise syntax. Oct 7, 2013 at 23:01
  • Would this make an extra call to any constructor of delctype(e)? Or is that the kind of thing that C++11 fixed? Apr 22, 2020 at 9:04
  • decltype(e){} would be more general. May 24, 2020 at 8:22
53

Use std::remove_const:

#include<type_traits>
...
for (std::remove_const<decltype(e)>::type i{0}; i < e; ++i)
1
  • 30
    Or std::remove_const_t<decltype(e)> i{0} with C++14
    – Praetorian
    Oct 7, 2013 at 22:17
14

You can also use std::decay:

#include<type_traits>
...
for (std::decay<decltype(e)>::type i{}; i < e; ++i) {
  // do something
}
1
  • 2
    Should be typename std::decay<decltype(e)>::type. C++14 added an alias to shorten this, std::decay_t<decltype(e)>
    – M.M
    Feb 1, 2018 at 10:50
9

A solution not mentioned yet:

for (decltype(+e) i{0}; i < e; ++i)

Prvalues of primitive type have const stripped; so +e is a prvalue of type int and therefore decltype(+e) is int.

2
  • This forces the type to be int instead of removing the const from a generic type. Still, cool trick! Apr 22, 2020 at 7:49
  • @CameronTacklind I guess you refer to integer promotions being applied -- smaller types than int are promoted to int but other types are unchanged. If e is long then i is long (not int).
    – M.M
    Jan 8, 2021 at 2:09
0

I prefer range-for. Simulate it is very easy.

#include <iostream>

template< typename T >
struct range_t
{
    struct iter
    {
        T operator * ()const noexcept { return n;}
        iter& operator ++()noexcept{ ++n; return *this;}
        friend
        bool operator != (iter const& lhs, iter const& rhs)noexcept
        { return lhs.n != rhs.n;}

        T n;
    };

    iter begin()const noexcept {return {b};}
    iter end() const noexcept{ return {e};}
    T b, e;
};
template< typename T > range_t<T>  range(T b, T e){ return {b,e}; }

int main()
{
    const int e = 10;

    for( auto i : range(0,e) )
    {
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    }
    return 0;
}
3
  • 1
    What I don't like with this approach is the boiler-plate code for such a simple application. Now, it can be useful in other contexts.
    – green diod
    Dec 4, 2016 at 1:37
  • I cannot see a compiler creating just as efficient code for this as for a normal for-loop. @greendiod you only have to declare the boilerplate once.
    – Luc Bloom
    Jan 5, 2018 at 13:21
  • @LucBloom With optimizations enabled, g++ outputs the same assembly for both range-based for and normal for: godbolt Mar 20, 2021 at 12:58

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