34

Is there a nicer way to do this?

if( $_POST['id'] != (integer)$_POST['id'] )
    echo 'not a integer';

I've tried

if( !is_int($_POST['id']) )

But is_int() doesn't work for some reason.

My form looks like this

<form method="post">
   <input type="text" name="id">
</form>

I've researched is_int(), and it seems that if

is_int('23'); // would return false (not what I want)
is_int(23);   // would return true

I've also tried is_numeric()

is_numeric('23'); // return true
is_numeric(23); // return true
is_numeric('23.3'); // also returns true (not what I want)

it seems that the only way to do this is: [this is a bad way, do not do it, see note below]

if( '23' == (integer)'23' ) // return true
if( 23 == (integer)23 ) // return true
if( 23.3 == (integer)23.3 ) // return false
if( '23.3' == (integer)'23.3') // return false

But is there a function to do the above ?


Just to clarify, I want the following results

23     // return true
'23'   // return true
22.3   // return false
'23.3' // return false

Note: I just figured out my previous solution that I presented will return true for all strings. (thanks redreggae)

$var = 'hello';
if( $var != (integer)$var )
    echo 'not a integer';

// will return true! So this doesn't work either.

This is not a duplicate of Checking if a variable is an integer in PHP, because my requirements/definitions of integer is different than theres.

  • Try RegEXP. preg_match('/^[\d]*$/',$variable)!==FALSE – CP510 Oct 7 '13 at 22:18
  • Why do you need to "validate"? Cannot you just filter values? So: $input = (int)$_POST['id'] . This will give you a 100% safe integer (or 0 in case of issues), and it is much easier to handle... – ItalyPaleAle Oct 7 '13 at 22:19
  • @Qualcuno I was thinking about that, but I want to notify the user that they didn't type in a correct number and not change it for them. – Arian Faurtosh Oct 7 '13 at 22:21
  • how about var_dump($_POST["id"]),this will tell you the datatype; – bhawin Oct 7 '13 at 22:22
  • Why? Suppose he/she types "aaa", it will become 0 and you will refuse it the same way as you'd refuse the input 0. (because it's an id, so I suppose it will be > 0). You will just tell your users "wrong input", no need to detail it further! – ItalyPaleAle Oct 7 '13 at 22:23

11 Answers 11

54

try ctype_digit

if (!ctype_digit($_POST['id'])) {
    // contains non numeric characters
}

Note: It will only work with string types. So you have to cast to string your normal variables:

$var = 42;
$is_digit = ctype_digit((string)$var);

Also note: It doesn't work with negative integers. If you need this you'll have to go with regex. I found this for example:

EDIT: Thanks to LajosVeres, I've added the D modifier. So 123\n is not valid.

if (preg_match("/^-?[1-9][0-9]*$/D", $_POST['id'])) {
    echo 'String is a positive or negative integer.';
}

More: The simple test with casting will not work since "php" == 0 is true and "0" === 0 is false! See types comparisons table for that.

$var = 'php';
var_dump($var != (int)$var); // false

$var = '0';
var_dump($var !== (int)$var); // true
  • 2
    $integer = 42; ctype_digit($integer); will return false – aaron Oct 7 '13 at 22:28
  • 1
    yes..if you check it with "normal" variable and not $_GET or $_POST than first cast to string. $is_digit = ctype_digit((string)42); – bitWorking Oct 7 '13 at 22:30
  • 3
    @aaron That is correct a string would need to be input. Luckily in case of $_POST values, they are always strings. – Mike Brant Oct 7 '13 at 22:31
  • 1
    @GeoffreyHuck Well, they're not unknown once you've used them... I think ctype_digit should be used much more often than is_numeric, which has a more memorable name but is rarely actually the test you want to perform. – IMSoP Oct 7 '13 at 22:59
  • 1
    You need the D modifier to the preg_match. And it doesn't accept the 0 to number. – Lajos Veres Oct 8 '13 at 7:50
15

try filter_var function

filter_var($_POST['id'], FILTER_VALIDATE_INT);

use:

if(filter_var($_POST['id'], FILTER_VALIDATE_INT)) { 
    //Doing somethings...

}
8

In PHP $_POST values are always text (string type).

You can force a variable into the integer type like this:

$int_id = (int)$_POST['id'];

That will work if you are certain that $_POST['id'] should be an integer. But if you want to make absolutely sure that it contains only numbers from 0 to 9 and no other signs or symbols use:

if( ctype_digit( $_POST['id'] ) )
{
  $int_id = (int)$_POST['id'];
}
  • Not true: $_POST can be array. – ntd Dec 7 '16 at 12:04
2

Check it out: http://php.net/manual/en/function.ctype-digit.php - it validates if string contains only digits, so be sure not to pass an int to that function as it will most likely return false; However all values coming from $_POST are always strings so you are safe. Also it will not validate negative number such as -18 since - is not a digit, but you can always do ctype_digit(ltrim($number, '-'))

is_int checks the variable type which in your case is string; it would be the same as (integer)$v === $v as == does some real obscure things in order to compare two variables of a different type; you should always use === unless you want mess like "0af5gbd" == 0 to return true

Also, keep in mind that ctype_digit will not tell you if the string can be actually converted to a valid int since maximum integer value is PHP_INT_MAX; If your value is bigger than that, you will get PHP_INT_MAX anyway.

  • nice idea with ltrim($number, '-')..but remember that ---123 will work in this way. – bitWorking Oct 9 '13 at 14:18
2
preg_match('/^\d+$/D',$variable) //edit 
2

Using is_numeric() for checking if a variable is an integer is a bad idea. This function will send TRUE for 3.14 for example. It's not the expected behavior

To do this correctly, you can use one of these options :

Considering this variables array :

$variables = [
    "TEST 0" => 0,
    "TEST 1" => 42,
    "TEST 2" => 4.2,
    "TEST 3" => .42,
    "TEST 4" => 42.,
    "TEST 5" => "42",
    "TEST 6" => "a42",
    "TEST 7" => "42a",
    "TEST 8" => 0x24,
    "TEST 9" => 1337e0
];

The first option (FILTER_VALIDATE_INT Way) :

# Check if your variable is an integer
if( ! filter_var($variable, FILTER_VALIDATE_INT) ){
  echo "Your variable is not an integer";
}

Output :

TEST 0 : 0 (type:integer) is not an integer ✘
TEST 1 : 42 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 2 : 4.2 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 3 : 0.42 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 4 : 42 (type:double) is an integer ✔
TEST 5 : 42 (type:string) is an integer ✔
TEST 6 : a42 (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 7 : 42a (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 8 : 36 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 9 : 1337 (type:double) is an integer ✔

The second option (CASTING COMPARISON Way) :

# Check if your variable is an integer
if ( strval($variable) != strval(intval($variable)) ) {
  echo "Your variable is not an integer";
}

Output :

TEST 0 : 0 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 1 : 42 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 2 : 4.2 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 3 : 0.42 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 4 : 42 (type:double) is an integer ✔
TEST 5 : 42 (type:string) is an integer ✔
TEST 6 : a42 (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 7 : 42a (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 8 : 36 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 9 : 1337 (type:double) is an integer ✔

The third option (CTYPE_DIGIT Way) :

# Check if your variable is an integer
if( ! ctype_digit(strval($variable)) ){
  echo "Your variable is not an integer";
}

Output :

TEST 0 : 0 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 1 : 42 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 2 : 4.2 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 3 : 0.42 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 4 : 42 (type:double) is an integer ✔
TEST 5 : 42 (type:string) is an integer ✔
TEST 6 : a42 (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 7 : 42a (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 8 : 36 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 9 : 1337 (type:double) is an integer ✔

The fourth option (REGEX Way) :

# Check if your variable is an integer
if( ! preg_match('/^\d+$/', $variable) ){
  echo "Your variable is not an integer";
}

Output :

TEST 0 : 0 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 1 : 42 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 2 : 4.2 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 3 : 0.42 (type:double) is not an integer ✘
TEST 4 : 42 (type:double) is an integer ✔
TEST 5 : 42 (type:string) is an integer ✔
TEST 6 : a42 (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 7 : 42a (type:string) is not an integer ✘
TEST 8 : 36 (type:integer) is an integer ✔
TEST 9 : 1337 (type:double) is an integer ✔
1

if you know it is a string variable (like post o get values), you can use:

function is_really_integer($var) {
  return $var == (string)(integer)$var;
}
1

The accepted answer using ctype_digit is correct, however you can make life easier using a function. This will covert the variable to a string, so you don't have to:

function is_num($x){
    if(!is_string($x)){
        $x=(string)$x;
    }
    if(ctype_digit($x)){
      return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Usage:

if (is_num(56)) {
    // its a number
}

if (is_num('56')) {
    // its a number
}

If you want to accept decimals too, use this:

function is_num($x){
    if(!is_string($x)){
        $x=(string)$x;
    }    
    if (strpos($x,'.')!==false) {      
        if(substr_count($x,'.')>1||strpos($x,'.')<1||strpos($x,'.')>=strlen($x)){
            return false;    
        }
        $x=str_replace('.','',$x);    
    }
    if(ctype_digit($x)){
        return true;
    }  
    return false;
}
0

Use the following, universal function to check all types:

function is_digit($mixed) {
    if(is_int($mixed)) {
        return true;
    } elseif(is_string($mixed)) {
        return ctype_digit($mixed);
    }

    return false;
}
0

I use:

is_int($val)||ctype_digit($val)

Note than this catch only positive integer strings

0

is_int is perfectly working there is not need of extra code

or you can check using is_numeric

  • If you read my question, you'd see why is_int and is_numeric don't give me the right values. – Arian Faurtosh Mar 22 '17 at 20:21

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