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After a lot of tinkering at a random number generator, I have come to the conclusion that my understanding of the Haskell type system is incomplete, if not missing altogether.

Here's an example. I'm trying to generate a stream of Poisson event times:

import System.Random
import Numeric

bround :: (RealFloat r, Integral b) => b -> r -> r
bround places x = (fromIntegral (round ( x * exp))) / exp
       where exp = 10.0 ^ places

rndp = (bround 4)

myGen = (mkStdGen 1278267)

infinitePoissonStream :: (RandomGen g, Random r, RealFloat r) => r -> r -> g -> [r]
infinitePoissonStream rate start gen = next:(infinitePoissonStream rate next newGen)
        where  (rvalue, newGen) = random gen
               next = (start - log(rvalue) / rate)

printAll :: (RealFloat r) => [r] -> IO ()
printAll []     = return ()
printAll (x:xs) = do putStrLn (showFFloat (Just 8) x "")
                     printAll xs

main = do
       printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen ) )

which chides me thus:

mwe3.hs:23:8:
    No instance for (RealFloat r0) arising from a use of `printAll'
    The type variable `r0' is ambiguous
    Possible fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    Note: there are several potential instances:
      instance RealFloat Double -- Defined in `GHC.Float'
      instance RealFloat Float -- Defined in `GHC.Float'
      instance RealFloat Foreign.C.Types.CDouble
        -- Defined in `Foreign.C.Types'
      ...plus one other
    In a stmt of a 'do' block:
      printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen))
    In the expression:
      do { printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen)) }
    In an equation for `main':
        main
          = do { printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen)) }

mwe3.hs:23:27:
    No instance for (Random r0)
      arising from a use of `infinitePoissonStream'
    The type variable `r0' is ambiguous
    Possible fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    Note: there are several potential instances:
      instance Random Bool -- Defined in `System.Random'
      instance Random Foreign.C.Types.CChar -- Defined in `System.Random'
      instance Random Foreign.C.Types.CDouble
        -- Defined in `System.Random'
      ...plus 33 others
    In the second argument of `take', namely
      `(infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen)'
    In the first argument of `printAll', namely
      `(take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen))'
    In a stmt of a 'do' block:
      printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen))

mwe3.hs:23:49:
    No instance for (Fractional r0) arising from the literal `1.0'
    The type variable `r0' is ambiguous
    Possible fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)
    Note: there are several potential instances:
      instance Fractional Double -- Defined in `GHC.Float'
      instance Fractional Float -- Defined in `GHC.Float'
      instance Integral a => Fractional (GHC.Real.Ratio a)
        -- Defined in `GHC.Real'
      ...plus two others
    In the first argument of `infinitePoissonStream', namely `1.0'
    In the second argument of `take', namely
      `(infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen)'
    In the first argument of `printAll', namely
      `(take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen))'

After poking around, I "fixed" it by changing the last line:

   printAll (take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen ) :: [Double])

Now, I wanted to use limited-precision arithmetic, so I changed the "next" line to this:

           next = rndp (start - log(rvalue) / rate)

and now it fails thus:

mwe3.hs:15:29:
    Could not deduce (r ~ Double)
    from the context (RandomGen g, Random r, RealFloat r)
      bound by the type signature for
                 infinitePoissonStream :: (RandomGen g, Random r, RealFloat r) =>
                                          r -> r -> g -> [r]
      at mwe3.hs:12:26-83
      `r' is a rigid type variable bound by
          the type signature for
            infinitePoissonStream :: (RandomGen g, Random r, RealFloat r) =>
                                     r -> r -> g -> [r]
          at mwe3.hs:12:26
    In the first argument of `(-)', namely `start'
    In the first argument of `rndp', namely
      `(start - log (rvalue) / rate)'
    In the expression: rndp (start - log (rvalue) / rate)

So I'm beginning to come to the conclusion that I really don't know what I'm doing. So:

  1. Can someone explain what I'm missing here?
  2. Any pointers to chapter and verse where I might stand a chance of understanding the underlying principles?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The problem here is that GHC can not automatically figure out which RealFloat you want to use. You coded everything in terms of RealFloat, and in main you haven't provided a concrete type for it to use, so it stops and says "couldn't figure it out". You can fix this by either changing at least one of your type signatures to use Float or Double specifically, but the better solution is to just specify which type it's supposed to be in main, like so:

main = printAll $ take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen :: [Double])

When you add the [Double] to this line, you are explicitly telling GHC which type to use during runtime. Without that, it only knows to use RealFloat r and Random r, and there are multiple types to choose from, namely Float and Double. Either will work for this case, but the compiler doesn't know that.

Additionally, I would suggest a few stylistic changes to get rid of some of those parens:

import System.Random
import Numeric

bround :: (RealFloat r, Integral b) => b -> r -> r
bround places x = fromIntegral (round $ x * e) / e
       where e = 10.0 ^ places
       -- exp is a pre-defined function, shouldn't name a variable with it

-- Even if it's trivial, you should add type signatures, it really helps others read your code faster
rndp = bround 4
myGen = mkStdGen 1278267

-- function application before operator application means you can remove some parens
infinitePoissonStream :: (RandomGen g, Random r, RealFloat r) => r -> r -> g -> [r]
infinitePoissonStream rate start gen = next : infinitePoissonStream rate next newGen
        where  (rvalue, newGen) = random gen
               next = start - log rvalue / rate

-- Start a new line at the beginning of a do block, the indentations are nicer
printAll :: (RealFloat r) => [r] -> IO ()
printAll []     = return ()
printAll (x:xs) = do
    putStrLn $ showFFloat (Just 8) x ""
    printAll xs

-- No need for a do block with only one statement
main = printAll $ take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen :: [Double])

These changes mostly from hlint.

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1  
Thank you (+1). Another, virtual, +1 for the stylistic advice, and my apologies to anyone whose eyes were hurt by my coding style. I deduce from your answer, perhaps incorrectly, that it might be better to abandon the use of the RealFloat class altogether, and just go straight to Double in place of r. Is that right? –  Brent.Longborough Oct 8 '13 at 13:07
3  
@Brent.Longborough It's mostly just that I pasted your code in my editor and it highlighted where you could get rid of parenthesis that weren't doing anything. The newline-at-do-block is also just one of my pet peeves, but your style was not particularly offensive. As for the types, I would say that only you can know if you need the flexibility of RealFloat. If you expect to use it for types other than Double, then keep it the way it is. If you are only going to use it with Double, then just change the signature to use Double explicitly. –  bheklilr Oct 8 '13 at 13:13

As for how you can learn more about how to debug this sort of problem, here's a trick that has helped me immensely. Whenever I am completely baffled by a message like this, I do the following:

  • If there's a type signature on the function in question, remove it and see if anything changes. If it compiles, ask ghci what the type is (using :t). If it doesn't compile, at least the error message may differ enough to give you another clue.
  • If there's no type signature, add one. Even if it doesn't compile, the error message may give you another clue.
  • If that doesn't help, then temporarily add type declarations on each of the expressions in the function. (Often you'll need to break up some of the expressions to see what's really going on. You may also need to temporarily enable the ScopedTypeVariables pragma.) Compile again and check the error messages.

That last one is more work, but I've learned a lot from that exercise. It usually pinpoints the exact place where there's a mismatch between what I think the type is and what GHC thinks the type is.

If I were doing that last one on your code, the changes might look something like this. Notice that the error is now pointing to the main function instead of the printAll function, which helps us figure out where to fix it.

printAll :: (RealFloat r) => [r] -> IO ()
printAll []     = return ()
printAll (x:xs) = do
  let temp1=showFFloat (Just 8) x "" :: String
  putStrLn temp1 :: IO ()
  printAll xs :: IO ()

main = do
  let temp2 = take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen ) :: (RealFloat r) => [r]
  -- but if you make this change, it compiles:
  -- let temp2 = take 10 (infinitePoissonStream 1.0 0.0 myGen ) :: [Double]
  printAll temp2

And of course, once I fix the compilation error, then I take another look at the original error message to see if I can understand it now.

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