3

I am testing out functions of the Queue structure in module multiprocessing. I fail to see why this simple piece of code is unable to terminate for a hardly large data set

Code:

from multiprocessing import Process,Queue

if __name__ == "__main__":

    tobeQueue = Queue()

    for i in range(1,10000):
        tobeQueue.put(i)

This code which should be terminating, is working for range less than equal to 3 orders of 10... But not for higher orders of 10 than 3...

1
  • Queues have an init argument maxsize, that when left to zero or None, results in an infinite length Queue. I just tried adding 100000 elements to a queue on my computer using Python 2.7.5 and it completed successfully. Put a if i%1000==0: print i` statement in your loop to see if its really the loop's fault. Whatever the problem is, it isn't obvious. – gregb212 Oct 8 '13 at 20:18
7

Ah I know now what the problem is.

from Queue import Queue

and

from multiprocessing import Queue 

are not the same queue. The multiprocessing (mp) queue has some special code in it to allow it to pass values back and forth between processes. It is a consequence of python GIL and threading handicap.

What is happening, is the queue will not allow the process it is in to die until it is empty. Pay special attention to the second red-highlighted warning. The loop is finishing normally, the queue is not allowing your python process to terminate because the queue is not in shared memory, like you would expect with threads. I am not entirely familiar with the process behind the mp.Queue, but it involves pickling the items on the queue between the put and get processes. Thus, eliminating one process abnormally may result in deadlock.

So you need to unload the queue completely, with queue.get(), and your process will terminate as expected.

This code will terminate as you would expect:

from multiprocessing import Process,Queue

if __name__ == "__main__":

    tobeQueue = Queue()

    for i in range(1,10000):
        tobeQueue.put(i)

    for i in range(1,10000):
        tobeQueue.get() #remove all 9999 items, allow it to die.
4
  • 1
    Thank you for a lot of clarification on this. But there is still a query. How does the program then terminate normally for numbers like 10 or 100, ie, for x in range(1,10) etc. The code works for small values of the range function.... ie, small data set – Arko Oct 9 '13 at 16:17
  • Hmm... that is interesting behavior isn't it? I suspect it has something to do with a Queue not knowing its exact size (it has no len attrib), but I am not certain. The answer may lie in the source, unfortunately. – gregb212 Oct 9 '13 at 17:45
  • 1
    Yes, really unpredictable behaviour... I hope some others also contribute to this. The data might get garbage collected. Collected huge data takes a lot of time i guess. – Arko Oct 9 '13 at 19:07
  • No its not garbage collection. It's definitely the queue locking up the python process. I think whats happening is the Queue, once it hits a certain threshold, starts a thread to push the data to the receiving process, using a pipe. All threads run on the same python instance that spawned the thread. Since nobody ever collects it, we deadlock until it is emptied, or kill -9 it. – gregb212 Oct 9 '13 at 20:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.