5
class Something
  @b = [4432]
  def screen
    puts @b.class
  end
end
s = Something.new
s.screen

outputs 'Nilclass'. Was wondering, why does an instance variable which is defined inside a class always part of NilClass?

6 Answers 6

11

Instance variables belong to an object (aka an instance), that's why they are called instance variables. Every instance has its own instance variables.

In your case, there are two objects: Something (which is an instance of Class) and s (which is an instance of Something). Each of those two objects has its own set of instance variables. Something has an instance variable called @b which points to [4432]. s has no instance variable named @b because you never assign to it, and uninitialized instance variables evaluate to nil.

6
  • Beautifully explained;
    – Bala
    Oct 9, 2013 at 10:33
  • but why if I put @b in the initialize method, then it's available and @b.class => Array? Or, in other words, taking your last sentence: s has no instance variable named @b because you never assign to it>> how do I assign @b to s? Can you let me know if there are more than 1 approach to this?
    – daremkd
    Oct 10, 2013 at 9:42
  • You assign to @b by calling a method on s which contains an assignment to @b. Like initialize, for example. Oct 10, 2013 at 9:44
  • Thanks a lot. With all this I wonder why putting an instance variable in a class is even remotely useful..
    – daremkd
    Oct 10, 2013 at 10:45
  • A class is an object just like any other object. It has instance variables for the same reason every other object has: to keep state private to that particular object. Oct 10, 2013 at 10:47
4

You need to set it like this:

class Something
  def initialize
    @b = [4432]
  end

  def screen
    puts @b.class
  end
end

The way you did it, the variable belongs to Something class itself, not its instance. Observe:

class Something
  @b = [4432]
end


s = Something.new
s.instance_variable_get(:@b) # => nil # !> instance variable @b not initialized

Something.instance_variable_get(:@b) # => [4432]
1
  • I see, so basically making instance variables in the class declaration directly like I did is only useful if you're also having class methods, right? Since you obviously can't use them in instance methods.
    – daremkd
    Oct 10, 2013 at 11:29
3

Generally the instance variable must be defined inside the constructor whereas in ruby the default constructor is initialize the syntax is

def initialize

end #these is the default constructor in ruby so when we define the insatnce variable inside the constructor and when we create the instance of a class then that instance/object will contain the copy of instance variables

most important thing is that though the instance/object contains the instance variable the instance/object cannot access it why because by default the instance data is private so in order to access it we need to define the getters and setter for those instance variable

class Something    
attr_accessor:b
def initialize
@b = [4432]
end
s=Something.new
puts"#{s.b}"
1

Because the variable @b does not exist!. For e.g. the following would produce the same results you see.

class Something
  @b = [4432]
  def screen
    puts @a.class  #=> note @a which is non-existent
  end
end
s = Something.new
s.screen

Whereas

class Something
  @b = [4432]
  def screen
    puts @a.class
  end
  def self.screen
    puts @b.class
  end
end
s = Something.new

s.screen #=> NilClass    
Something.screen #=> Array
0

if you initialize @b outside the initializer, you want @b scope to be a class variable, so you have to call it @@b : @@b has the same value for all Instance of your Something Class

like :

class Somthing
  @@b = [4432] 
  def initialize
    #[...]
  end

  def screen
    puts @@b.class 
  end 
end
0

@Jörg W Mittag answer is correct. I just wont to add, that defining an instance variable in class != defining instance variable in an instance of that class. To create an instance variable, in your case in s instance you need to add an initialize method witch gets triggered when new method is called on a class.

def initialize(b_value = default_value)
  @b = b_value
end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.