183

I am working on 'how to access elements randomly from an array in javascript'. I found many links regarding this. Like: Get random item from JavaScript array

var item = items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)];

But in this, we can choose only one item from the array. If we want more than one elements then how can we achieve this? How can we get more than one element from an array?

6

25 Answers 25

310

Just two lines :

// Shuffle array
const shuffled = array.sort(() => 0.5 - Math.random());

// Get sub-array of first n elements after shuffled
let selected = shuffled.slice(0, n);

DEMO:

7
  • 41
    Very nice! One liner also of course possible: let random = array.sort(() => .5 - Math.random()).slice(0,n)
    – unitario
    Apr 19, 2017 at 15:30
  • 2
    Genius! Elegant, short and simple, fast, using built-in functionality.
    – Vlad
    Sep 29, 2017 at 20:54
  • 59
    It's nice, but is far from random. The first item has many more chances to get picked than the last one. See here why: stackoverflow.com/a/18650169/1325646
    – pomber
    Mar 25, 2018 at 18:53
  • 7
    Amazing! if you want to keep the array intact you can just alter the first line like this: const shuffled = [...array].sort(() => 0.5 - Math.random());
    – Yair Levy
    Mar 27, 2019 at 8:21
  • 6
    It's nice but CPU intensive for big arrays; why do you need to sort the whole array if you will pick up only few elements? Dec 11, 2021 at 15:16
207

Try this non-destructive (and fast) function:

function getRandom(arr, n) {
    var result = new Array(n),
        len = arr.length,
        taken = new Array(len);
    if (n > len)
        throw new RangeError("getRandom: more elements taken than available");
    while (n--) {
        var x = Math.floor(Math.random() * len);
        result[n] = arr[x in taken ? taken[x] : x];
        taken[x] = --len in taken ? taken[len] : len;
    }
    return result;
}
13
  • 42
    Hey man, I just wanted to say I spent about ten minutes appreciating the beauty of this algorithm. Apr 8, 2017 at 9:57
  • @Derek朕會功夫 Ah, clever, that works much better for small samples from large ranges indeed. Especially with using an ES6 Set (which wasn't available in '13 :-/)
    – Bergi
    Aug 8, 2017 at 0:22
  • @AlexWhite Thanks for the feedback, I can't believe this bug evaded everyone for years. Fixed. You should have posted a comment though, not suggested an edit.
    – Bergi
    Feb 20, 2018 at 17:22
  • 2
    @cbdev420 Yes, it's just a (partial) fisher-yates shuffle
    – Bergi
    Sep 24, 2019 at 12:52
  • 1
    The jsPerf link seems broken at the moment. Jun 22, 2021 at 14:43
31

There is a one-liner unique solution here

 array.sort(() => Math.random() - Math.random()).slice(0, n)
2
22

lodash _.sample and _.sampleSize.

Gets one or n random elements at unique keys from collection up to the size of collection.

_.sample([1, 2, 3, 4]);
// => 2

_.sampleSize([1, 2, 3], 2);
// => [3, 1]
 
_.sampleSize([1, 2, 3], 3);
// => [2, 3, 1]
2
  • What is _? It's not a standard Javascript object.
    – vanowm
    Oct 4, 2020 at 21:32
  • 3
    @vanowm It's lodash which is usually imported with the _ alias. Jan 26, 2021 at 12:04
15

Getting 5 random items without changing the original array:

const n = 5;
const sample = items
  .map(x => ({ x, r: Math.random() }))
  .sort((a, b) => a.r - b.r)
  .map(a => a.x)
  .slice(0, n);

(Don't use this for big lists)

2
  • Could we have a better explanation of how this works?
    – Qasim
    Jan 1, 2020 at 7:28
  • @Qasim, the algorithm takes an array of items (line 2) and makes an array of pairs: the original item and a random number (line 3). It then sorts the array of pairs per the random number (line 4). Then it makes a list of simple items again, only using the original item (thus skipping the random number, line 5). Finally, it picks the first n items of the (randomly ordered) array of items (line 6). For a better understanding, read the documentation of functions like map and sort, like in developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…. Mar 26, 2021 at 17:48
13

create a funcion which does that:

var getMeRandomElements = function(sourceArray, neededElements) {
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < neededElements; i++) {
        result.push(sourceArray[Math.floor(Math.random()*sourceArray.length)]);
    }
    return result;
}

you should also check if the sourceArray has enough elements to be returned. and if you want unique elements returned, you should remove selected element from the sourceArray.

2
  • Good answer! Have a look at my answer, copied your code and added "only unique elements" functionality.
    – evilReiko
    Feb 17, 2019 at 12:29
  • 1
    This function can return the same element of sourceArray multiple times.
    – Sampo
    Jun 19, 2019 at 20:58
13

Porting .sample from the Python standard library:

function sample(population, k){
    /*
        Chooses k unique random elements from a population sequence or set.

        Returns a new list containing elements from the population while
        leaving the original population unchanged.  The resulting list is
        in selection order so that all sub-slices will also be valid random
        samples.  This allows raffle winners (the sample) to be partitioned
        into grand prize and second place winners (the subslices).

        Members of the population need not be hashable or unique.  If the
        population contains repeats, then each occurrence is a possible
        selection in the sample.

        To choose a sample in a range of integers, use range as an argument.
        This is especially fast and space efficient for sampling from a
        large population:   sample(range(10000000), 60)

        Sampling without replacement entails tracking either potential
        selections (the pool) in a list or previous selections in a set.

        When the number of selections is small compared to the
        population, then tracking selections is efficient, requiring
        only a small set and an occasional reselection.  For
        a larger number of selections, the pool tracking method is
        preferred since the list takes less space than the
        set and it doesn't suffer from frequent reselections.
    */

    if(!Array.isArray(population))
        throw new TypeError("Population must be an array.");
    var n = population.length;
    if(k < 0 || k > n)
        throw new RangeError("Sample larger than population or is negative");

    var result = new Array(k);
    var setsize = 21;   // size of a small set minus size of an empty list

    if(k > 5)
        setsize += Math.pow(4, Math.ceil(Math.log(k * 3) / Math.log(4)))

    if(n <= setsize){
        // An n-length list is smaller than a k-length set
        var pool = population.slice();
        for(var i = 0; i < k; i++){          // invariant:  non-selected at [0,n-i)
            var j = Math.random() * (n - i) | 0;
            result[i] = pool[j];
            pool[j] = pool[n - i - 1];       // move non-selected item into vacancy
        }
    }else{
        var selected = new Set();
        for(var i = 0; i < k; i++){
            var j = Math.random() * n | 0;
            while(selected.has(j)){
                j = Math.random() * n | 0;
            }
            selected.add(j);
            result[i] = population[j];
        }
    }

    return result;
}

Implementation ported from Lib/random.py.

Notes:

  • setsize is set based on characteristics in Python for efficiency. Although it has not been adjusted for JavaScript, the algorithm will still function as expected.
  • Some other answers described in this page are not safe according to the ECMAScript specification due to the misuse of Array.prototype.sort. This algorithm however is guaranteed to terminate in finite time.
  • For older browsers that do not have Set implemented, the set can be replaced with an Array and .has(j) replaced with .indexOf(j) > -1.

Performance against the accepted answer:

1
  • I've posted an optimized version of this code below. Also corrected the wrong random parameter in the second algo in your post. I wonder how many people are using the previous biased version in production, hope nothing critical.
    – user
    Apr 7, 2020 at 11:35
10

If you want to randomly get items from the array in a loop without repetitions you can remove the selected item from the array with splice:

var items = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
var newItems = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
  var idx = Math.floor(Math.random() * items.length);
  newItems.push(items[idx]);
  items.splice(idx, 1);
}

console.log(newItems);

2
  • 1
    In statement items.splice(idx,1) why you use this '1'? splice?? Oct 9, 2013 at 10:47
  • 2
    Shyam Dixit, according to the MDN documentation the 1 is the deleteCount indicating the number of old array elements to remove. (Incidentally, I reduced the last two lines to newItems.push(items.splice(idx, 1)[0])).
    – Kurt Peek
    Oct 10, 2017 at 7:14
8

ES6 syntax

const pickRandom = (arr,count) => {
  let _arr = [...arr];
  return[...Array(count)].map( ()=> _arr.splice(Math.floor(Math.random() * _arr.length), 1)[0] ); 
}
1
  • Neat and concise!
    – jeffbRTC
    Feb 3, 2021 at 16:46
5

I can't believe that no one didn't mention this method, pretty clean and straightforward.

const getRnd = (a, n) => new Array(n).fill(null).map(() => a[Math.floor(Math.random() * a.length)]);
3
  • 4
    You are not making sure two items don't get repeated.
    – Valery
    Nov 10, 2020 at 16:11
  • the op wasn't asking for that
    – DedaDev
    Apr 7, 2021 at 0:23
  • Yes he was. Reading the comments and edits clearly states that no duplicates should be in the result.
    – Lumnezia
    Aug 4, 2022 at 8:11
3
Array.prototype.getnkill = function() {
    var a = Math.floor(Math.random()*this.length);
    var dead = this[a];
    this.splice(a,1);
    return dead;
}

//.getnkill() removes element in the array 
//so if you like you can keep a copy of the array first:

//var original= items.slice(0); 


var item = items.getnkill();

var anotheritem = items.getnkill();
0
3

Here's a nicely typed version. It doesn't fail. Returns a shuffled array if sample size is larger than original array's length.

function sampleArr<T>(arr: T[], size: number): T[] {
  const setOfIndexes = new Set<number>();
  while (setOfIndexes.size < size && setOfIndexes.size < arr.length) {
    setOfIndexes.add(randomIntFromInterval(0, arr.length - 1));
  }
  return Array.from(setOfIndexes.values()).map(i => arr[i]);
}

const randomIntFromInterval = (min: number, max: number): number =>
  Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1) + min);
3

In this answer, I want to share with you the test that I have to know the best method that gives equal chances for all elements to have random subarray.

Method 01

array.sort(() => Math.random() - Math.random()).slice(0, n)

using this method, some elements have higher chances comparing with others.

calculateProbability = function(number=0 ,iterations=10000,arraySize=100) { 
let occ = 0 
for (let index = 0; index < iterations; index++) {
   const myArray= Array.from(Array(arraySize).keys()) //=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ... arraySize]
   
  /** Wrong Method */
    const arr = myArray.sort(function() {
     return val= .5 - Math.random();
      });
     
  if(arr[0]===number) {
    occ ++
    }

    
}

console.log("Probability of ",number, " = ",occ*100 /iterations,"%")

}

calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(25)
calculateProbability(25)
calculateProbability(25)

Method 2

Using this method, the elements have the same probability:

 const arr = myArray
      .map((a) => ({sort: Math.random(), value: a}))
      .sort((a, b) => a.sort - b.sort)
      .map((a) => a.value)

calculateProbability = function(number=0 ,iterations=10000,arraySize=100) { 
let occ = 0 
for (let index = 0; index < iterations; index++) {
   const myArray= Array.from(Array(arraySize).keys()) //=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, ... arraySize]
   

  /** Correct Method */
  const arr = myArray
  .map((a) => ({sort: Math.random(), value: a}))
  .sort((a, b) => a.sort - b.sort)
  .map((a) => a.value)
    
  if(arr[0]===number) {
    occ ++
    }

    
}

console.log("Probability of ",number, " = ",occ*100 /iterations,"%")

}

calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(0)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(50)
calculateProbability(25)
calculateProbability(25)
calculateProbability(25)

The correct answer is posted in in the following link: https://stackoverflow.com/a/46545530/3811640

3

2020
non destructive functional programing style, working in a immutable context.

const _randomslice = (ar, size) => {
  let new_ar = [...ar];
  new_ar.splice(Math.floor(Math.random()*ar.length),1);
  return ar.length <= (size+1) ? new_ar : _randomslice(new_ar, size);
}


console.log(_randomslice([1,2,3,4,5],2));

3
  • I realize that the function does not generate all possible random array from a source array. In other world, the result is not as random as it should... any idea of improvement? Oct 4, 2020 at 10:29
  • 1
    where is _shuffle function?
    – vanowm
    Oct 4, 2020 at 17:36
  • 1
    Also, when the size >= ar.length, the result will be size-1
    – idleberg
    Dec 11, 2020 at 23:18
1

EDIT: This solution is slower than others presented here (which splice the source array) if you want to get only a few elements. The speed of this solution depends only on the number of elements in the original array, while the speed of the splicing solution depends on the number of elements required in the output array.

If you want non-repeating random elements, you can shuffle your array then get only as many as you want:

function shuffle(array) {
    var counter = array.length, temp, index;

    // While there are elements in the array
    while (counter--) {
        // Pick a random index
        index = (Math.random() * counter) | 0;

        // And swap the last element with it
        temp = array[counter];
        array[counter] = array[index];
        array[index] = temp;
    }

    return array;
}

var arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9];

var randoms = shuffle(arr.slice(0)); // array is cloned so it won't be destroyed
randoms.length = 4; // get 4 random elements

DEMO: http://jsbin.com/UHUHuqi/1/edit

Shuffle function taken from here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/6274398/1669279

6
  • That depends on the percentage of random items required from the array. If you want 9 random elements from a 10 element array, it will surely be faster to shuffle than to extract 9 random elements one after the other. If the percentage this is useful for is less than 50%, then there are use cases where this solution is the fastest. Otherwise i concede that it is useless :).
    – Tibos
    Oct 9, 2013 at 10:52
  • I meant that shuffling 9 elements is faster than shuffling 10 elements. Btw I'm confident that the OP does not want to destroy his input array…
    – Bergi
    Oct 9, 2013 at 10:59
  • I don't think i understand how shuffling 9 elements helps in this problem. I am aware that if you want more than half the array you can simply slice-out random elements until you remain with how many you want then shuffle to get a random order. Is there anything i missed? PS: Fixed array destruction, thanks.
    – Tibos
    Oct 9, 2013 at 11:12
  • It doesn't have to do anything with "half of". You just need to do as much work as elements you want to get back, you don't need to treat the whole array at any point. Your current code has a complexity of O(n+k) (n elements in the array, you want k of them) while O(k) would be possible (and optimal).
    – Bergi
    Oct 9, 2013 at 11:44
  • 1
    OK, your code has more like O(2n) which could be reduced to O(n+k) if you'd change the loop to while (counter-- > len-k) and take the last (instead of first) k elements out of it. Indeed splice(i, 1) doesn't have O(1), but a O(k) solution is still possible (see my answer). Space complexity however stays at O(n+k) unfortunately, but could become O(2k) depending on the sparse array implementation.
    – Bergi
    Oct 9, 2013 at 12:24
1

I needed a function to solve this kind of issue so I'm sharing it here.

    const getRandomItem = function(arr) {
        return arr[Math.floor(Math.random() * arr.length)];
    }

    // original array
    let arr = [4, 3, 1, 6, 9, 8, 5];

    // number of random elements to get from arr
    let n = 4;

    let count = 0;
    // new array to push random item in
    let randomItems = []
    do {
        let item = getRandomItem(arr);
        randomItems.push(item);
        // update the original array and remove the recently pushed item
        arr.splice(arr.indexOf(item), 1);
        count++;
    } while(count < n);

    console.log(randomItems);
    console.log(arr);

Note: if n = arr.length then basically you're shuffling the array arr and randomItems returns that shuffled array.

Demo

1

Here's an optimized version of the code ported from Python by @Derek, with the added destructive (in-place) option that makes it the fastest algorithm possible if you can go with it. Otherwise it either makes a full copy or, for a small number of items requested from a large array, switches to a selection-based algorithm.

// Chooses k unique random elements from pool.
function sample(pool, k, destructive) {
    var n = pool.length;
    
    if (k < 0 || k > n)
        throw new RangeError("Sample larger than population or is negative");
    
    if (destructive || n <= (k <= 5 ? 21 : 21 + Math.pow(4, Math.ceil(Math.log(k*3) / Math.log(4))))) {
        if (!destructive)
            pool = Array.prototype.slice.call(pool);
        for (var i = 0; i < k; i++) { // invariant: non-selected at [i,n)
            var j = i + Math.random() * (n - i) | 0;
            var x = pool[i];
            pool[i] = pool[j];
            pool[j] = x;
        }
        pool.length = k; // truncate
        return pool;
    } else {
        var selected = new Set();
        while (selected.add(Math.random() * n | 0).size < k) {}
        return Array.prototype.map.call(selected, i => pool[i]);
    }
}

In comparison to Derek's implementation, the first algorithm is much faster in Firefox while being a bit slower in Chrome, although now it has the destructive option - the most performant one. The second algorithm is simply 5-15% faster. I try not to give any concrete numbers since they vary depending on k and n and probably won't mean anything in the future with the new browser versions.

The heuristic that makes the choice between algorithms originates from Python code. I've left it as is, although it sometimes selects the slower one. It should be optimized for JS, but it's a complex task since the performance of corner cases is browser- and their version-dependent. For example, when you try to select 20 out of 1000 or 1050, it will switch to the first or the second algorithm accordingly. In this case the first one runs 2x faster than the second one in Chrome 80 but 3x slower in Firefox 74.

3
  • There's an error in log(k*3, 4) since JS doesn't have the base argument. Should be log(k*3)/log(4)
    – disfated
    Sep 28, 2020 at 14:49
  • Also, I see a downside in the part where you reuse pool as a result. Since you truncate pool it cannot be used as a source for sampling any longer and next time you use sample you will have to recreate pool from some source again. Derek's implementation only shuffles the pool, so it can be perfectly reused for sampling without recreating. And I believe this is the most frequent use case.
    – disfated
    Sep 28, 2020 at 15:44
  • @disfated, thanks, fixed log in my and Derek's code. As for reusing the pool, just don't enable the destructive option, then the pool argument is shadowed with a copy.
    – user
    Nov 28, 2020 at 8:58
1

Sampling with possible duplicates:

const sample_with_duplicates = Array(sample_size).fill().map(() => items[~~(Math.random() * items.length)])

Sampling without duplicates:

const sample_without_duplicates = [...Array(items.length).keys()].sort(() => 0.5 - Math.random()).slice(0, sample_size).map(index => items[index]);

Since without duplicates requires sorting the whole index array first, it is considerably slow than with possible duplicates for big items input arrays.

Obviously, the max size of without duplicates is <= items.length

Check this fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/doleron/5zw2vequ/30/

1
  • This is a simple solution for simple cases, but for large arrays, it's not truly random. I suggest using Fisher-Yates (aka Knuth) Shuffle and then you should cut first N results with the slice. Apr 15, 2022 at 14:32
0

It extracts random elements from srcArray one by one while it get's enough or there is no more elements in srcArray left for extracting. Fast and reliable.

function getNRandomValuesFromArray(srcArr, n) {
    // making copy to do not affect original srcArray
    srcArr = srcArr.slice();
    resultArr = [];
    // while srcArray isn't empty AND we didn't enough random elements
    while (srcArr.length && resultArr.length < n) {
        // remove one element from random position and add this element to the result array
        resultArr = resultArr.concat( // merge arrays
            srcArr.splice( // extract one random element
                Math.floor(Math.random() * srcArr.length),
                1
            )
        );
    }

    return resultArr;
}

1
  • Welcome to SO! When posting answers, it is important to mention how your code works and/or how it solves OP's problem :)
    – Joel
    Aug 30, 2018 at 18:05
0

Here's a function I use that allows you to easily sample an array with or without replacement:

  // Returns a random sample (either with or without replacement) from an array
  const randomSample = (arr, k, withReplacement = false) => {
    let sample;
    if (withReplacement === true) {  // sample with replacement
      sample = Array.from({length: k}, () => arr[Math.floor(Math.random() *  arr.length)]);
    } else { // sample without replacement
      if (k > arr.length) {
        throw new RangeError('Sample size must be less than or equal to array length         when sampling without replacement.')
      }
      sample = arr.map(a => [a, Math.random()]).sort((a, b) => {
        return a[1] < b[1] ? -1 : 1;}).slice(0, k).map(a => a[0]); 
      };
    return sample;
  };

Using it is simple:

Without Replacement (default behavior)

randomSample([1, 2, 3], 2) may return [2, 1]

With Replacement

randomSample([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], 4) may return [2, 3, 3, 2]

0
var getRandomElements = function(sourceArray, requiredLength) {
    var result = [];
    while(result.length<requiredLength){
        random = Math.floor(Math.random()*sourceArray.length);
        if(result.indexOf(sourceArray[random])==-1){
            result.push(sourceArray[random]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}
0
const items = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'I', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', 1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

const fetchRandomArray = ({pool=[], limit=1})=>{
let query = []
let selectedIndices = {}

while(query.length < limit){
    const index = Math.floor(Math.random()*pool.length)
    if(typeof(selectedIndices[index])==='undefined'){
        query.push(items[index])
        selectedIndices[index] = index
    }
}

console.log(fetchRandomArray({pool:items, limit:10})
1
  • This is a memory efficient method of doing it Aug 13, 2022 at 10:38
-2

Here is the most correct answer and it will give you Random + Unique elements.

function randomize(array, n)
{
    var final = [];
    array = array.filter(function(elem, index, self) {
        return index == self.indexOf(elem);
    }).sort(function() { return 0.5 - Math.random() });

    var len = array.length,
    n = n > len ? len : n;

    for(var i = 0; i < n; i ++)
    {
        final[i] = array[i];
    }

    return final;
}

// randomize([1,2,3,4,5,3,2], 4);
// Result: [1, 2, 3, 5] // Something like this
2
  • There's something strange going on with the randomization in this one - I had the same result show up 6 out of 9 tries (with an n of 8 and an array size of 148). You might think about switching to a Fisher-Yates method; it's what I did and now works much better.
    – asetniop
    Jun 14, 2017 at 23:20
  • This takes quadratic time because it does a bad uniqueness check and doesn’t have an equal chance of selecting every item because it sorts with a random comparison.
    – Ry-
    Aug 7, 2017 at 22:43
-2

items.sort(() => (Math.random() > 0.5 ? 1 : -1)).slice(0, count);

1
  • Results in slightly uneven distribution.
    – Patrolin
    Nov 22, 2020 at 19:00
-2

2019

This is same as Laurynas Mališauskas answer, just that the elements are unique (no duplicates).

var getMeRandomElements = function(sourceArray, neededElements) {
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < neededElements; i++) {
    var index = Math.floor(Math.random() * sourceArray.length);
        result.push(sourceArray[index]);
        sourceArray.splice(index, 1);
    }
    return result;
}

Now to answer original question "How to get multiple random elements by jQuery", here you go:

var getMeRandomElements = function(sourceArray, neededElements) {
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < neededElements; i++) {
    var index = Math.floor(Math.random() * sourceArray.length);
        result.push(sourceArray[index]);
        sourceArray.splice(index, 1);
    }
    return result;
}

var $set = $('.someClass');// <<<<< change this please

var allIndexes = [];
for(var i = 0; i < $set.length; ++i) {
    allIndexes.push(i);
}

var totalRandom = 4;// <<<<< change this please
var randomIndexes = getMeRandomElements(allIndexes, totalRandom);

var $randomElements = null;
for(var i = 0; i < randomIndexes.length; ++i) {
    var randomIndex = randomIndexes[i];
    if($randomElements === null) {
        $randomElements = $set.eq(randomIndex);
    } else {
        $randomElements.add($set.eq(randomIndex));
    }
}

// $randomElements is ready
$randomElements.css('backgroundColor', 'red');
2
  • 1
    please don't use jQuery for this type of code Apr 15, 2021 at 13:10
  • @MartijnScheffer the original question was asking for a solution using jQuery
    – evilReiko
    Apr 16, 2021 at 11:52

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